How do you remove the rear trim panels?
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Thread: How do you remove the rear trim panels?

  1. #1
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    How do you remove the rear trim panels?

    Does anyone know how to remove the rear trim panels (Third row)? I would like to route some new speaker wires but having trouble with the panels. Does anyone have any diagrams they could share? Thanks.

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  3. #2
    alexmish
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    I tried that this past weekend, and eventially gave up. First of all, you need to have a special trim kit by Honda. Secondly, the process is very complicated and I thought I am going to break a thing or two along the way, so I just gave up. The Service Manual has only very high-level info on how this to be done, and very convoluted one, too !

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    Thanks Alexmish.

    Anyone else tried this before?

    My last resort will be to drill a hole on the side wall of the trim panel, where the spare tire sits, that way it's still hidden when the spare tire cover is capped on. Hopefully I can reach in to get the wires snake through.

  5. #4
    Registered User 05-tour-a-matic's Avatar
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    New speaker wire?????

    Even the pros use the factory speaker wire when at all possible! It's usually run/hidden well, and typically is well shielded from interferance. Plus, wiring is easier the next time around (especially if it's being done by someone else).

    One trick is to mount the amp in the trunk, use the rear OEM speaker wires to take the amp signal to the back of the head unit. Then cut the front speaker wires and attach them to the rear wires (from the amp). Very effective and simple. KISS is the best motto for car audio.

    So, why again were you planning to run new wires?

  6. #5
    Registered User 6spdtl's Avatar
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    The trim panel "tool" is a small pry bar. You should be able to find one at Home depot for 5 bucks, as to removel try to find a service manual and follow the instructions, as alex has stated even with the manual, it might not be the easiest task and along the way you may break a trim clip or two which you will have to replace to avoid bad rattles. What do you want to remove it for??? To acces the speaker all you have to remove is the grill. Visit HandA for a service manual, they run around 70 bucks.

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    Registered User 05-tour-a-matic's Avatar
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    6spd... he said route new wires... not install new speakers. i was perplexed about the new wire comment. Can't figure out why he'd wanna do that... But I'm eager to find out

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    I'm installing a new amp, woofer and equalizer enclosure in the cargo well area made from fibre glass and MDF. I need to run some RCA wires from the head unit to my amp and run new speaker wires from my amp to the speakers. I'll post some pictures when I'm done.

    With regards to 05-tour-a matic's reply... I know that same trick. But you only use that trick if the aftermarket system you are using is running less than or equal to the same load as the factory system. However, there is no way those factory speaker wires can handle big loads, like 100-125 Watts RMS in my case. If I were to use the factory wires I will burn them out fairly quickly. And the factory speaker wires are not well shielded, they are just placed properly so that they do not pick up interference. Notice how thin the shielding are on those factory wires; they do not compare to the aftermarket speaker wires whose shielding can be as think as coaxial wires at times. Hence, there are different guage wires for different applications and varying budgets. Whoever is the Pro you mentioned that uses factory speaker wires for their aftermarket setups, he or she is not a Pro. A Pro would not even be caught dead using factory speaker wires, unless it's for flossing their teeth. I've been installing aftermarket sound systems for 12 years. No offense, but in our field, the trick you mentioned is called the Mickey Mouse trick.

    I'm installing a premium sound sytem on my Odyssey and I want to do it properly and cleanly. Hence, I need to remove the rear panels to route and tie the wires properly. I'm actually amazed with the Odyssey...in 12 years, this is the first time I've seen a Honda have interior trim panels that are nicely and tightly knit together. It makes me even wonder where to even start prying panels.:>

  9. #8
    Registered User arvinthsiva's Avatar
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    bptan,

    Could you post pictures when your install is complete? Thanks!
    =========================================
    2005 - Honda Odyssey EX (Desert Rock Metallic) with Billet Grille
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  10. #9
    Registered User 05-tour-a-matic's Avatar
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    Never have done it professionally, but I've installed many systems. Including several best in show winners. I agree with what you say (for the most part), but still hold for the avg joe, the "mickey mouse" method works well.

    I guess I'll have to defer to your expert opnion on the high load wires... I've never felt the need to use a ton of power. My best system, involved a mere 80w amp. The judges at one show made me remove body panels to check for hidden amps. I didn't mind. And I was rewarded with best in class/show for my efforts. As you already know, it's not how much power you have, just what you do with it.

    Is it possible to fish the wires thru without removing the entire panel?

    I've always run power down one side of the vehicle and signal down the other. The location of existing wires and installed components dictated which sides I'd use. However, on some vehicles, I've seen channels down the middle of the passenger compartment. I once used such a channel for my RCAs (amp input).

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    05-tour-a-matic : You're right, power isn't everything...quality IS. But with more power, you get more punch. I don't listen to music loud (volume level at 12) but I'd like to FEEL the music playing with high definition. Furthermore, I thought about creating a channel for the wires but I'll leave it as a last resort. The ceiling is another option I'm thinking about, but I don't know how hard is it to remove. Anyone knows?

    In addition to the aftermarket sound system in the back cargo well, I'm also going to put a playstation 2 slim, between the two front seats, under the flip tray upfront. In a carpeted box of course.

    I just got started and last night I just drilled a hole on the inner side panel of the spare tire well. The hole is hidden when the spare tire cover is on. I fished the lead power wire for my amp and the AC power wire for my playstation 2 thorugh it (from the rear aux inputs to the front) Right now I'm deciding if I want to use the the same side for the AUX audio/video feed for my playstation. I'm hoping that the RCA wires I'm using (for pro home audio systems) are shielded enough, since they are quite thick, to handle the interference from the 12V lead wire.

    Also, I'm currently worried as to how to route the speaker wires on the passenger side trim panels. There's no way of hiding a hole if I have to drill one, like what I did on the driver side. I may have to cut into the carpet and fish the wires under the carpet to the 2nd row passenger side door sill. I'll make my decision tonight.

  12. #11
    Registered User 05-tour-a-matic's Avatar
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    I completely agree with the punch-factor.. Tho, with my 80watt system I mentioned before, I think I was getting 138-142 db in spl competitions. Granted it was a smaller car. Sound quality is everything to me, thats why I had $4,000 into an 80w system.

    I used nothing but the best cables and connectors (4 ga power cable for expl.), but I used the factory speaker wires and it sounded awesome! Granted at 20w rms per speaker, it wasn't too much load on the factory wires. I used a larger cable for my 12" subwoofer, which was only running 80watts rms. Granted, I was running 4 Oz 6.5" mid basses, 2 Oz tweeters, one Oz 12" sub all from an 80 orion amp. Buy that amp rocked! Ahh, those were the days.

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    I had seen this thread earlier and was disappointed no one answered the original question.

    I just finished replacing the passenger 3rd row seatbelt in my 2006 Odyssey, which required removal and replacement of the trim panel. Instructions were enclosed with the new seatbelt ordered from Honda, but I had to scan thru the whole document because the needed info was not in the section about 3rd row seatbelt replacement.

    Trim panel removal is not terribly difficult, but is rather fussy and slow work. Basically the panels are held in place by little plastic pins that snap into holes in the underlying metal bodywork. In addition, the rear panel is held at the bottom by the sliding door threshold panel and the rear hatch threshold panel, and at the top by the pillar trim panels flanking the rear window. (These are called Pillars C and D, repectively).

    You may as well start by unbolting the 2nd row seatbelt at the floor and on Pillar C. Down at the floor, pull back the rubbery cover and unscrew the bolt using a 14mm wrench. Up above, on the pillar, remove the plastic cover at the sealbelt shoulder height adjustment mechanism. This cover has hooks molded into either side, so gently use a screwdriver to pry them loose and pop off the cover, then unscrew the bolt with your 14mm wrench.

    Next, remove the sliding door threshold panel by prying it up with a screwdriver or prybar and getting your fingers under it until you hear and feel the pins pop loose one by one. You will develop a feel for how much force to apply. Use your fingers as much as possible, because you risk marring the plastic edges with steel tools. The threshold panel is hooked into the other trim panels at either end, so work it to disengage.

    Fold the rear seat down flat and remove the plastic cover over the seat pivot. Pry the forward side up first and then rotate it rearwards over the pivot, and then disengage and remove it fully.

    At the rear hatch, unscrew the two cargo net knobs on the passenger side. The plastic knobs will probably come off like nuts, leaving a steel stud behind, or the stud may remain attached to the knob; either way is okay.

    Pry loose and remove the little plate on the rear trim panel "window sill" where the seat belt enters. BTW, keep all these little loose parts together as you go.

    On Pillar D (rearmost pillar) there is a small square cover that says something about air bags. Pry this loose at the top, as it is hinged at the bottom. You may need something thinner than a screwdriver (try a pocket knife). Once this is open, remove the Phillips head screw inside.

    Pillar C (forward) also has a square "air bag" cover plate, but it works differently. Just pry it straight out, but not all the way out. Just let it dangle.

    At this point all the major hindrances to removing the passenger side rear trim panel have been dealt with. Starting back at the rear hatch, pry the panel loose and pull it away from the wall, using fingers as much as possible. Listen for the plastic pins to pop loose as you go. There are two at the rear, four across the "window sill" and two toward the front. There is another pin in the center of the panel, but it will pop loose eventually as you pull the panel away from the wall.

    NOTE: The lower trim panel and the pillar trim panels are hooked together, so you have to work those joints to separate them. NOTE: DO NOT TRY TO PULL THE PILLAR TRIM PANELS LOOSE AT THE TOP. First loosen them at the bottom, and then rotate and work them gently free of the headliner. Similarly, the main trim panel should be loosened at either end and along the top before rotating the panel in, sort of pivoting at its base. It is hooked under the rear hatch threshold, so you'll have to work it free by pushing down and rotating.

    Long before this point, I was wondering if I could get at the seatbelt retractor spool behind the trim panel without completely removing the trim panel. However, there was a hard plastic a/c duct in the way, so I had to completely remove the trim panel to get at the duct. It turned out there wasn't much holding the duct in place and I was able to loosen it enough to get the old seat belt spool out and the new one bolted in.

    Reinstall everything in reverse order. One tip I can offer concerns the little square plate on the Pillar C trim panel, the one I said to leave dangling. This gizmo is actually a long plastic stud. When I finally managed to pull the Pillar C trim panel loose from the main trim panel, this stud fell out. It is molded in tan plastic (my van has tan interior) but it had a separate black piece on the end. I thought I would never get this stud/plate back in place during reinstallation. Here's the trick: take the little black piece loose from the stud, and install it first by itself by pushing it into the hole, making sure the cross-shaped hole is aligned correctly to match the tan stud. The small black piece is analogous to a nut, and the tan stud is like a bolt. Put the "nut" in first, then poke the "bolt" in on top of it. Otherwise, the stud forces the "nut" to expand BEFORE IT CAN ENTER THE HOLE in the metal bodywork, and no amount of pushing or pounding will force it in.

    Best Regards,
    John

  14. #13
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    Does anyone know the best way to reinstall the metal clips used on the front of these panels?

    They slip onto tabs on the panel and slip behind the door seal on the car at a right angles to the panel. It looks like the panel won't bend enough to get the clips to slip sideways to go in behind the seal.
    Thanks
    Last edited by anguscls; 11-02-2012 at 12:55 PM.
    2006 Odyssey EX-L (RES), J35A7 i-VTEC engine, Redrock Pearl Metallic, Gray Interior 130k

  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH56 View Post
    I had seen this thread earlier and was disappointed no one answered the original question.

    I just finished replacing the passenger 3rd row seatbelt in my 2006 Odyssey, which required removal and replacement of the trim panel. Instructions were enclosed with the new seatbelt ordered from Honda, but I had to scan thru the whole document because the needed info was not in the section about 3rd row seatbelt replacement.

    Trim panel removal is not terribly difficult, but is rather fussy and slow work. Basically the panels are held in place by little plastic pins that snap into holes in the underlying metal bodywork. In addition, the rear panel is held at the bottom by the sliding door threshold panel and the rear hatch threshold panel, and at the top by the pillar trim panels flanking the rear window. (These are called Pillars C and D, repectively).

    You may as well start by unbolting the 2nd row seatbelt at the floor and on Pillar C. Down at the floor, pull back the rubbery cover and unscrew the bolt using a 14mm wrench. Up above, on the pillar, remove the plastic cover at the sealbelt shoulder height adjustment mechanism. This cover has hooks molded into either side, so gently use a screwdriver to pry them loose and pop off the cover, then unscrew the bolt with your 14mm wrench.

    Next, remove the sliding door threshold panel by prying it up with a screwdriver or prybar and getting your fingers under it until you hear and feel the pins pop loose one by one. You will develop a feel for how much force to apply. Use your fingers as much as possible, because you risk marring the plastic edges with steel tools. The threshold panel is hooked into the other trim panels at either end, so work it to disengage.

    Fold the rear seat down flat and remove the plastic cover over the seat pivot. Pry the forward side up first and then rotate it rearwards over the pivot, and then disengage and remove it fully.

    At the rear hatch, unscrew the two cargo net knobs on the passenger side. The plastic knobs will probably come off like nuts, leaving a steel stud behind, or the stud may remain attached to the knob; either way is okay.

    Pry loose and remove the little plate on the rear trim panel "window sill" where the seat belt enters. BTW, keep all these little loose parts together as you go.

    On Pillar D (rearmost pillar) there is a small square cover that says something about air bags. Pry this loose at the top, as it is hinged at the bottom. You may need something thinner than a screwdriver (try a pocket knife). Once this is open, remove the Phillips head screw inside.

    Pillar C (forward) also has a square "air bag" cover plate, but it works differently. Just pry it straight out, but not all the way out. Just let it dangle.

    At this point all the major hindrances to removing the passenger side rear trim panel have been dealt with. Starting back at the rear hatch, pry the panel loose and pull it away from the wall, using fingers as much as possible. Listen for the plastic pins to pop loose as you go. There are two at the rear, four across the "window sill" and two toward the front. There is another pin in the center of the panel, but it will pop loose eventually as you pull the panel away from the wall.

    NOTE: The lower trim panel and the pillar trim panels are hooked together, so you have to work those joints to separate them. NOTE: DO NOT TRY TO PULL THE PILLAR TRIM PANELS LOOSE AT THE TOP. First loosen them at the bottom, and then rotate and work them gently free of the headliner. Similarly, the main trim panel should be loosened at either end and along the top before rotating the panel in, sort of pivoting at its base. It is hooked under the rear hatch threshold, so you'll have to work it free by pushing down and rotating.

    Long before this point, I was wondering if I could get at the seatbelt retractor spool behind the trim panel without completely removing the trim panel. However, there was a hard plastic a/c duct in the way, so I had to completely remove the trim panel to get at the duct. It turned out there wasn't much holding the duct in place and I was able to loosen it enough to get the old seat belt spool out and the new one bolted in.

    Reinstall everything in reverse order. One tip I can offer concerns the little square plate on the Pillar C trim panel, the one I said to leave dangling. This gizmo is actually a long plastic stud. When I finally managed to pull the Pillar C trim panel loose from the main trim panel, this stud fell out. It is molded in tan plastic (my van has tan interior) but it had a separate black piece on the end. I thought I would never get this stud/plate back in place during reinstallation. Here's the trick: take the little black piece loose from the stud, and install it first by itself by pushing it into the hole, making sure the cross-shaped hole is aligned correctly to match the tan stud. The small black piece is analogous to a nut, and the tan stud is like a bolt. Put the "nut" in first, then poke the "bolt" in on top of it. Otherwise, the stud forces the "nut" to expand BEFORE IT CAN ENTER THE HOLE in the metal bodywork, and no amount of pushing or pounding will force it in.

    Best Regards,
    John

    JohnH56 - Taking off the rear trim panels is a REAL pain, but at least I didn't do things wrong with your great and detailed instructions. Thank you THANK YOU THANK YOU for your post = VERY helpful!!!

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by anguscls View Post
    Does anyone know the best way to reinstall the metal clips used on the front of these panels?

    They slip onto tabs on the panel and slip behind the door seal on the car at a right angles to the panel. It looks like the panel won't bend enough to get the clips to slip sideways to go in behind the seal.
    Thanks
    anguscls - pull off the door seal from the sheet-metal edge - then install the clips properly, then push the door seal back on/down...

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