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Recently I had all four brake pads changed and rotors resurfaced at the dealer.
(Earlier discussions here:
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/24-19...4-03-ody-brake-pad-how-measure-thickness.html
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/24-19...3-ody-brake-pad-rotor-may-need-resurface.html)

Some time after that I started to notice subtle once per revolution noise when braking at low speed. I don't know exactly when it started to happen since the 03 Ody is my wife's and I only drive it occasionally.

Today I brought it back to the dealer and they tried to correct it but couldn't do it. They said the only way to fix it is to replace the rotor at 300 something dollars. They also said I could leave it along and it's absolutely safe to drive albeit the noise. Is it really safe to drive with the rotor runout like this? Thanks!
 

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Today I brought it back to the dealer and they tried to correct it but couldn't do it. They said the only way to fix it is to replace the rotor at 300 something dollars. They also said I could leave it along and it's absolutely safe to drive albeit the noise. Is it really safe to drive with the rotor runout like this? Thanks!
Did they diagnose the problem to be a rotor that isn't straight and true? If so, I would ask them why their resurfacing equipment isn't good enough to make a rotor perfectly flat. Now, if it has been resurfaced a few times already, then it's likely too thin and would have to be replaced.

Did they also make sure it wasn't insuffcient lube around the pad bracket and shims? That's usually what causes noise with new pads.
 

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Some suggestions for you. I'm on my third set of rotors since I purchased the car used.(214k). The Odyssey rotors I've used have all been aftermarket, but I don't think any of them are thick enough to prevent warping. It may have to do with the icy puddles and hot breaks in the winter, or driving the van too hard on those hot summer days. I've had lousy performance with a set of "gold" aftermarket ceramic pads. The pad were all cracked and broken. The pads appeared overheated, and the vand didn't stop well at all. I went with ceramic because that's stock. I since then replaced them with a "gold" grade of semi-metallic pads. The Semi-metallic pads offer more bite and stopping power. But on a recent check of the pads, 'm also starting to get small heat cracks in the center of the semi-metallic pads. With all three sets of rotors, stock and two aftermarket the rotors warped. This results in a pulsation in the steering wheel when first stepping on the brake at high speed. I can't imagine a cut rotor (even thinner) surviving for long without warping. I have to say, the folks at AutoZone were excellent and honored the warranty on what I deemed to be bad ceramic pads. They replaced the pads and the rotors under warranty. Since then I've bought a ton of stuff at the AutoZone.

Suggestions: 1) When the car is cool, jack up the wheel and spin it to see if you can hear any noise. Then if you are able to isolate the wheel, left or right, take off the wheel and look to see if the rotor is damaged or shows something in one spot. I've seen rare instances where a little rock lodged itself between the pad and the rotor, or the rotor and the heat shield around the rotor. You may also want to douse the rotor, front and back with a good brake cleaner like CRC. Do not get this on the paint or plastic of your car. It's ok to douse the brakes thought. Rotate the rotor with your hand and wipe down the rotor well with some clean rags before the cleaner evaporates. It's normal to get some brake dust, but you should not get any grease as megatron suggested in his reply.

2) Not a brake issue, but I used to get a strange clicking, or crunching sound only at low speeds. I thought it was a bad CV joint for the longest time. Parking attendance used to ask me what was wrong with my car, because the noise was very easy to hear inside a parking garage at low speeds. I could never figure it out. Eventually I figured out it was the plastic hubcap moving ever so slightly on the rim as the wheel turned at low speed. To solve the problem, I cut the plastic ridge off the neck of a 2 liter soda bottle, and placed this makeshift plastic washer between the lug nut and the hubcap as a shim. Note, this did not interfere with the actual metal to metal contact of the lug to the nut which would be dangerous, but instead between the washer on the lug and the plastic of the hubcap. Once I did this on a few lugs and the noise was history. Tightening the lug nuts actually squishes this hard plastic, and it stays in place either stuck to the lug nut when it's removed, or stuck to the hub cap. It sounds strange but the lift ridge on the soda bottle neck seemed to be just the right size. Good luck, and don't be so afraid of those aftermarket parts and mechanics. $300 goes a long way when your in the zone.
 
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