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Discussion Starter #1
My 2015 odyssey just hit 110k miles.
I was kinda of overdue for timing belt + water pump + tensioner + idler etc, also serpentine belt and tensioner. I was waiting for the weather to get warmer since NY area does get brisk cold.
But all of sudden, my alternator went out. Although it was barely 5 years old, it does have 110k miles on so I thought alternator was time to go.
I asked my mechanic to do whole timing belt set (timing belt + water pump + tensioner + idler etc) job and change alternator and thermostat.
Expecting somewhere around $1800~$2000 for total cost, but it came out to be almost $1000 more.

Now, I've known this mechanic for years and although he is NOT cheap, he is one of those rare honest guy. So when he said something needs to be changed, it does need to be changed.

He said my VVT Solenoid has issue so there was another $650 cost for Rocker Arm oil control valve repair. He said oil was leaking and the oil gotten into alternator area making it seize.
Now, I never had VVT Solenoid issue with my previous odyssey (3rd gen) up until I sold it at 160k, but I guess 4th gen does have somewhat of VVT solenoid issue.
I do my own oil change every 5k miles on the dot. And change filter every 2 oil changes (10k) with Honda OEM filter. So I really don't think dirty engine oil is the issue for this VVT solenoid issue.
Even sent my engine oil to Blackstone lab at 100k miles and came out that the engine is as top shape as it can be for 100k miles car. I'm starting to wonder, is VVT solenoid another 100k miles maintenance item?

Ultimately, my mechanic did little more for me like right-side engine mount (I knew odyssey has bit of issue with engine mounts), Serpentine belt + tensioner, both air filter changed, oil change and inspection for $2800 tax included.
I really Hope this should get me another 100k trouble free other than oil change + tranny fluid change.
...and perhaps another $3000 repair at 200k miles? :(
 

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Curious, you waited till 100K Miles for the timing belt? Or second time you did it?
105k miles is the correct interval. He was only late by 5k miles.

The spool valve repair was so expensive because Honda doesn't sell the gasket without the valve. Hopefully there will be an aftermarket option (or hopefully there is an aftermarket option that somebody can link!) for just the gasket. The spool valve itself is probably just fine.

-Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sorry, if I wasn't clear. Yes as phattyduck said, I waited until 110k miles for the timing belt where 105k miles is the 'recommended' miles for timing belt change.
I just hope this new valve doesn't become regular maintenance item as it is pretty expensive repair even at every 100k miles.
 

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105k miles is the correct interval. He was only late by 5k miles.

The spool valve repair was so expensive because Honda doesn't sell the gasket without the valve. Hopefully there will be an aftermarket option (or hopefully there is an aftermarket option that somebody can link!) for just the gasket. The spool valve itself is probably just fine.

-Charlie
Agreed. That concept is common in car repairs - the genuine manufacturer part you need (gasket in this case) is not sold separately, so you are kind of forced to buy the complete assembly whether you need it or not.

When I did the TB job on my 2011 LX at 105k miles, I wanted to replace the crankshaft front seal (with no problems), and ended up getting that seal and a bunch of other stuff in this kit: FEL-PRO TCS46026. One of the random things included in that kit was, I believe, the solenoid gasket you needed.

Doing a site search on that part number finds this older post of mine, with more details:

Expecting your mechanic to find something like that may be beyond the call of duty. Sounds like he did the work at a fair price.
 

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Curious, you waited till 100K Miles for the timing belt? Or second time you did it?
105k miles is the correct interval. He was only late by 5k miles.
I think there might be some crossed signals here because Honda Canada has a different recommendation for the lifespan of a timing belt. This is copied right from Honda Canada's website for the maintenance schedule on a 2015 Odyssey EX:

154084


It's possible for a Canadian market Odyssey to call for a timing belt replacement as early as 62,000 miles (100,000 km) because of the extreme prolonged cold weather we can experience up here. The 100,000 mile recommendation is the dominant one mentioned here because that's what American Honda says is appropriate for US market vehicles.

My 2015 is getting discomfortingly close to 100,000 km, but at this point in time I don't think I'm automatically going to book in for a timing belt service as soon as we hit 6-digit mileage. I don't think we have driven in sub -29C weather "regularly", though Honda's definition of that word and mine may differ. For now, I'm prepared to wait for the Maintenance Minder to throw a "4" code, but I'm expecting that it will happen somewhere between 100,000 km (62,000 miles) and 168,000 km (105,000 miles).

Sorry for the short sidebar - I don't want to derail the thread. I just wanted to clarify where two different perspectives were likely coming from.
 

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Time to start wrenching on your van by yourself. 4th gens are easy to work on.

We all started somewhere. You already can change your own oil, so...take the next step.
I don't know... I'm comfortable doing oil and other fluids and filters, brakes, some suspension stuff, plugs, coils... easier stuff. Digging into a timing belt change is not exactly the next logical step up from an oil change.

My overarching strategy with this van has been to save enough money doing the smaller maintenance and repairs myself so that paying for someone to do the timing belt doesn't hurt so bad. But my attitude on that might change as the time comes closer and I keep on learning more. Fortunately for me, my fellow Odyclubbers are pretty forthcoming with help and advice. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't know... I'm comfortable doing oil and other fluids and filters, brakes, some suspension stuff, plugs, coils... easier stuff. Digging into a timing belt change is not exactly the next logical step up from an oil change.

My overarching strategy with this van has been to save enough money doing the smaller maintenance and repairs myself so that paying for someone to do the timing belt doesn't hurt so bad. But my attitude on that might change as the time comes closer and I keep on learning more. Fortunately for me, my fellow Odyclubbers are pretty forthcoming with help and advice. :)
I think I'm at exact same place with CroMath.
I've done pads, spark plugs, the struts (taking spring outs and re-insert the new strut) and thermostats etc but anything more than that might be a stretch for me.
I use this van Monday through Saturday from 6AM til 7PM~8PM (not driving consistently but almost 4~5 hours of daily usage) about 90 miles per day usage.
That only leaves me Sunday for me to work on this car; any job that is bigger than 5~6 hours as an amateur myself, I am kind of too afraid to tackle because if some reason I cannot finish the job by Sunday night, my whole week schedule gets complicated. :eek:

Like CroMath says, I too want to use this van as long as possible at minimum cost (does not mean minimum maintenance). Timing Belt and other major maintenance is something I'd rather leave it to professional (lucky for me, I know a local guy I can rely on) and be worry free. Hopefully last week's $2,800 would get me through next 3.5 years of 100k miles haha
And of course, all the savings are from great helps of odyclub community!
 

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Its actually typical for manufacturers to make different recommendations to servicing vehicle based on country of sale.
I think in this case, the driving factor is cold. However USA north states experience similar temperatures.

I would not sweat driving that Honda timing belt to 105k miles whether it was US or Canada, just based on my own observations.
I have lost count to how many TB I have done.
 

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My 2015 odyssey just hit 110k miles.
I was kinda of overdue for timing belt + water pump + tensioner + idler etc, also serpentine belt and tensioner. I was waiting for the weather to get warmer since NY area does get brisk cold.
But all of sudden, my alternator went out. Although it was barely 5 years old, it does have 110k miles on so I thought alternator was time to go.
I asked my mechanic to do whole timing belt set (timing belt + water pump + tensioner + idler etc) job and change alternator and thermostat.
Expecting somewhere around $1800~$2000 for total cost, but it came out to be almost $1000 more.

Now, I've known this mechanic for years and although he is NOT cheap, he is one of those rare honest guy. So when he said something needs to be changed, it does need to be changed.

He said my VVT Solenoid has issue so there was another $650 cost for Rocker Arm oil control valve repair. He said oil was leaking and the oil gotten into alternator area making it seize.
Now, I never had VVT Solenoid issue with my previous odyssey (3rd gen) up until I sold it at 160k, but I guess 4th gen does have somewhat of VVT solenoid issue.
I do my own oil change every 5k miles on the dot. And change filter every 2 oil changes (10k) with Honda OEM filter. So I really don't think dirty engine oil is the issue for this VVT solenoid issue.
Even sent my engine oil to Blackstone lab at 100k miles and came out that the engine is as top shape as it can be for 100k miles car. I'm starting to wonder, is VVT solenoid another 100k miles maintenance item?

Ultimately, my mechanic did little more for me like right-side engine mount (I knew odyssey has bit of issue with engine mounts), Serpentine belt + tensioner, both air filter changed, oil change and inspection for $2800 tax included.
I really Hope this should get me another 100k trouble free other than oil change + tranny fluid change.
...and perhaps another $3000 repair at 200k miles? :(
While some of these items are maintenance, neither Alternator nor VVT spool valve are that.
I am not going to comment on prices, honest and good mechanics are rare and worth to pay extra.
That said, the VVT repair is something anybody can perform, I believe @MrRangerZr1 put out a few videos on the topic.
All that needs replacement are the two gaskets. Its also true that leaking valve will eventually spell a demise for the alternator, but
I see a much higher failure rate of 07+ alternators than 05-06. My own 05 is on original alternator with 218k on the clock.

I hope mechanic used a Denso refurb alternator, otherwise, almost guaranteed to fail in 1-2 years.

As far as general car care. First 100k on almost any car are trouble free. After that, you slowly start replacing the parts that wear out.
Suspension components such as Struts/shocks/Lower control arms/Trailing arms/stabilizer bar links.
You will get other oil leaks, such as valve covers, rear VVT valve, RMS, ofhg, etc..

Don't get too comfortable, but do a wheels off inspection each oil change and you should be able to stay ahead of the game.
 

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My bad, wasn't thinking straight The 100K Miles = 160K Km in Canada. I did ours at 170Kkm. No, we dont regularly drive below -29C! maybe a few days a winter gets that cold. So nope does not apply to most canadians unless you live in northern Alberta!

The timing belt is not a easy one. You have to have some confidence that you can get it done. Its a long job. You need a variety of tools, different length sockets, extenders, breaker bars. And While I have the right crankshaft pulley tool, I never was able to get it to work. Most seem to use the "breaker bar on the lower A arm and briefly run the starter" method. Just tedious to do because its so hard to get to many of the bolts. I did it years ago on our 2002 Ody and vowed to get rid of our 2014 before I had to do it.. but here we are...
The best part of the timing belt job is the beer in the garage fridge!

E
 

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Here's the really stupid part (I think), the spool valve is only there to operate VCM. Is that true?
 

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While some of these items are maintenance, neither Alternator nor VVT spool valve are that.
I am not going to comment on prices, honest and good mechanics are rare and worth to pay extra.
That said, the VVT repair is something anybody can perform, I believe @MrRangerZr1 put out a few videos on the topic.
All that needs replacement are the two gaskets. Its also true that leaking valve will eventually spell a demise for the alternator, but
I see a much higher failure rate of 07+ alternators than 05-06. My own 05 is on original alternator with 218k on the clock.

I hope mechanic used a Denso refurb alternator, otherwise, almost guaranteed to fail in 1-2 years.

As far as general car care. First 100k on almost any car are trouble free. After that, you slowly start replacing the parts that wear out.
Suspension components such as Struts/shocks/Lower control arms/Trailing arms/stabilizer bar links.
You will get other oil leaks, such as valve covers, rear VVT valve, RMS, ofhg, etc..

Don't get too comfortable, but do a wheels off inspection each oil change and you should be able to stay ahead of the game.
You make an interesting point about the alternator. My uncle had an 03 MDX that was on its original alternator when he sold it at 176K. I seem to read of many people with pre-05ish MDXes and pre-06 Pilots that have very long lasting alternators. Seems like 05 Odyssey alternators may have been okay as well... but a LOT of 06-08 Pilot and 06 or 07+ Odyssey alternators need to be replaced between 80-120K. The previous owner of my Odyssey replaced the alternator sometime last year (with a Denso unit), which I estimate was somewhere between 78-80K miles. There must have been a part or supplier change around 2006 causing all the alternator failures.
 

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Here's the really stupid part (I think), the spool valve is only there to operate VCM. Is that true?
I am not 100% sure, but I think its responsible for the entire head, not just cylinder 4 vcm deactivation.
IIRC, the piston is still moving up and down and valves continue to open/close during VCM operation, its the fuel that gets cut off.
 

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I am not 100% sure, but I think its responsible for the entire head, not just cylinder 4 vcm deactivation.
IIRC, the piston is still moving up and down and valves continue to open/close during VCM operation, its the fuel that gets cut off.
Nope. The valves stay closed on the deactivated cylinders. The rear head has 3 valve settings (6, 4, 3 cylinder modes), the front has two (6/3 and 4 cylinder). There is also only one cam profile, unlike traditional Honda VTEC engines.

-Charlie
 

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Nope. The valves stay closed on the deactivated cylinders. The rear head has 3 valve settings (6, 4, 3 cylinder modes), the front has two (6/3 and 4 cylinder). There is also only one cam profile, unlike traditional Honda VTEC engines.

-Charlie
yes, my bad, I should have looked up VCM operation before speaking out. Valve operation gets decoupled on the cylinders that deactivate.
Then, back to original question, yes, that front Spool valve is directly responsible for VCM operation of the cylinder 4.
Next time I do valve cover gaskets on VCM2 engine, I will inspect it more.
 

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My 2015 odyssey just hit 110k miles.
I was kinda of overdue for timing belt + water pump + tensioner + idler etc, also serpentine belt and tensioner. I was waiting for the weather to get warmer since NY area does get brisk cold.
But all of sudden, my alternator went out. Although it was barely 5 years old, it does have 110k miles on so I thought alternator was time to go.
I asked my mechanic to do whole timing belt set (timing belt + water pump + tensioner + idler etc) job and change alternator and thermostat.
Expecting somewhere around $1800~$2000 for total cost, but it came out to be almost $1000 more.

Now, I've known this mechanic for years and although he is NOT cheap, he is one of those rare honest guy. So when he said something needs to be changed, it does need to be changed.

He said my VVT Solenoid has issue so there was another $650 cost for Rocker Arm oil control valve repair. He said oil was leaking and the oil gotten into alternator area making it seize.
Now, I never had VVT Solenoid issue with my previous odyssey (3rd gen) up until I sold it at 160k, but I guess 4th gen does have somewhat of VVT solenoid issue.
I do my own oil change every 5k miles on the dot. And change filter every 2 oil changes (10k) with Honda OEM filter. So I really don't think dirty engine oil is the issue for this VVT solenoid issue.
Even sent my engine oil to Blackstone lab at 100k miles and came out that the engine is as top shape as it can be for 100k miles car. I'm starting to wonder, is VVT solenoid another 100k miles maintenance item?

Ultimately, my mechanic did little more for me like right-side engine mount (I knew odyssey has bit of issue with engine mounts), Serpentine belt + tensioner, both air filter changed, oil change and inspection for $2800 tax included.
I really Hope this should get me another 100k trouble free other than oil change + tranny fluid change.
...and perhaps another $3000 repair at 200k miles? :(
I have always been curious as to everyone that needs the VVT control valve is quoted outrageous prices. I just did a search at hondaautomotiveparts.com where I have been buying from for years. and they quote $147.28 for that part. Cannot possibly the labor. My two cents.
 

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105k miles is the correct interval. He was only late by 5k miles.

The spool valve repair was so expensive because Honda doesn't sell the gasket without the valve. Hopefully there will be an aftermarket option (or hopefully there is an aftermarket option that somebody can link!) for just the gasket. The spool valve itself is probably just fine.

-Charlie
Just bought one gasket from hondaautomotiveparts.com "filter assy, spool valve" $18.29, for an 06 touring.
 
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