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I have a 2014 Odyssey that has just over 100k miles on it. Today It wouldn't start. I got a jump and it started no problem, then promptly replaced the battery. It sat for a few hours, and did start back up, but struggled a bit. It's due for 100k-110k service, and may also need an alternator. It also has started making a clicking sound in the front end when turning.
Now the car is paid off, but with the milage and the cost of the potential repairs, is it worth fixing, (how much more time can i get out of it) or should I trade up?
It is our only car and we do a lot of driving with kids and dogs.
 

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I have a 2014 Odyssey that has just over 100k miles on it. Today It wouldn't start. I got a jump and it started no problem, then promptly replaced the battery. It sat for a few hours, and did start back up, but struggled a bit. It's due for 100k-110k service, and may also need an alternator. It also has started making a clicking sound in the front end when turning.
Now the car is paid off, but with the milage and the cost of the potential repairs, is it worth fixing, (how much more time can i get out of it) or should I trade up?
It is our only car and we do a lot of driving with kids and dogs.
Depends on how you feel about taking on a new car payment! Sounds like you may have a couple thousand in repairs/maintenance with the timing belt service (typically $900-1200 at the dealer), and maybe some other repairs. In general, these vans are pretty reliable assuming you do the scheduled maintenance (including transmission fluid changes) and disable the VCM system. There are plenty of posters here with well over 150K reliable miles.

Was this your first new battery? Most only get 3-4 years out of one. Any other warning lights on the dash? Clicking while turning sounds like a bad CV joint or axle.
 

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Trade your car payments for a bit of repairs, and you should be good for a while after that.
1500 for the major service if done right, axle 2-300max installed, not sure an alternator goes that soon on these gen 4's.
do you have the charging system error?
is the vcm disabled?

like one mechanic friend says to his customers, if you don't like car repairs or payments, then get used to taking the bus.
 

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Generally speaking it is far more cost effective to keep a car of this age going than it is to trade and buy a new one. Even if your van needs an alternator - it'll need a timing belt too if you haven't done it already - those are not incredibly expensive repairs. Statistically, what you'll spend in maintenance on this vehicle, will be less than the cost of payments and maintenance on a new one. If you're otherwise happy to own and drive your current car then keep it. You'll save money. If you really like the idea of a new one, the looks, features etc it offers, then that may be a reason for you to upgrade. Enjoy your Odyssey, new or old(er)!

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Depends on how you feel about taking on a new car payment! Sounds like you may have a couple thousand in repairs/maintenance with the timing belt service (typically $900-1200 at the dealer), and maybe some other repairs. In general, these vans are pretty reliable assuming you do the scheduled maintenance (including transmission fluid changes) and disable the VCM system. There are plenty of posters here with well over 150K reliable miles.

Was this your first new battery? Most only get 3-4 years out of one. Any other warning lights on the dash? Clicking while turning sounds like a bad CV joint or axle.
Yes, this was the first battery change and even after running it for a couples and restarting it's still struggle to start. No warning light have come on at all...
 

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Yes, this was the first battery change and even after running it for a couples and restarting it's still struggle to start. No warning light have come on at all...
Is it taking more time to turn over than usual, but once it starts up it runs ok?

Or is it harder to start AND idles rough once it gets going?
 

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With just a few tools, watching a video, and a few hours, most of these are easy repairs. The hardest part of the alternator is figuring out how to turn it to get it back in. With that said it only took 5 minutes or so to fit it in place.
 

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Statistically, what you'll spend in maintenance on this vehicle, will be less than the cost of payments and maintenance on a new one.
Don't forget the much higher depreciation on a new vehicle.

If the decision is purely financial, it almost never pays to get a new vehicle over repairing the current one.

-Charlie
 

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AFAIK the most common cause of alternator failure on the gen 4 Ody is oil leaking from the spool valve gasket and dripping onto the alternator. You can check this by looking for oily residue near the dipstick area. If this is the case you will need a new spool valve and alternator along with the other stuff mentioned in the previous posts.

My vote is to repair it. If you DIY you can probably do all of this for under $1k, or about the equivalent of one new car payment. If you pay a reputable mechanic it may be $2-3k, or the equivalent of about 4 new car payments. Either way the repair cost won't be nearly as much as a new one depreciates the moment you drive it off the lot.
 

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With just a few tools, watching a video, and a few hours, most of these are easy repairs. The hardest part of the alternator is figuring out how to turn it to get it back in. With that said it only took 5 minutes or so to fit it in place.
For those of us that are really into DIY this may be true, but keep in mind the general rule that a member that joined literally minutes before posting this kind of question that DIY is not in their wheelhouse, so this kind of advise is probably not that useful.

OP, you have some great advise so far. Many of us here have 200K+ miles on a very dependable platform and the 2nd 100K is generally pretty cheap as a cost per mile compared to the first 100K. Keep in mind the 100K mark is the point where it is time to invest in some preventative maintenance, so it's best to either commit to the car for the long term or trade it and let these things be done by someone else. I bought my current Ody at 113K after the first owner spent all of the 100K maintenance money then decided they wanted a new SUV as their family was moving past the need for a van. The money spent didn't change the market value of the van except to someone like me that knew what they were looking for. If you see yourself needing a van for another 100K then commit to it and move forward.

The dealer will always be the most expensive place to get work done, an independent that is good with Hondas next, and the best value is finding a good "side work" mechanic for the planned maintenance where you have time to schedule. You may know someone in your network that works at a dealership or a shop that does things like brakes or other maintenance work on the weekends and that can save you 50% or more vs the dealer or even an independent shop. Obviously you need to get a qualified shop to figure out the starting issue first because getting stranded gets old quick, but once that is solved you'll have time to figure out the 105K maintenance. As pointed out already, a new vehicle payment is going to cost you $600+ a month or $7,200 a year. This repair plus the maintenance is likely to cost you less than 1/2 that then next 4 years after that should cost you less than $2,000 a year and that's a really bad year. I DIY a lot and haven't averaged $500 a year. I even had some years that cost me nothing beyond oil changes and other fluids as tires and brakes last multiple years at a time. It's simple math. $2,000 a year is $10,000 over 5 years, while payments on a new van are a minimum of $35,000 over that same period.

Good luck!
 

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Jolene...Jolene...Jolene...Joleeeeeeene....I'm begging of you please don't trade your car. </Dolly Parton voice>

It's cheaper to keep her. Alternator (starting issue), CV (clicking while turning), and timing belt jobs are nothing out of the ordinary. It'll may be more money up front, but in the long run it's more cost effective to do the repairs and keep the car than make payments every month for years. Find an independent mechanic, not a dealer, and at least get a quote so you'll know what $$$ you're up against. Get the alternator tested (and replaced if necessary) first, then the CV replaced second, then save up for the timing belt which can certainly wait till you have the cash.
 

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Have the new battery load tested. I once, years ago, replaced an old battery and the new one failed in a few days. They replaced it no questions asked after a load test. It certainly isn't likely but it is possible.
 

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Besides the obvious spool valve ruining the alternator, who replaced the battery? I would look at the workmanship there as well. The clamps must be tight! And never cut off a factory one that won't tighten enough, use a shim. Or replace the whole cable.

I hate making car payments, especially at my advanced age. But I added up the repairs on my last Odyssey and they were far more than the van was worth. But 18 years and 256k was pretty good. Only the last 20-30k were uncomfortable. My daughter is still driving the 2003 we had, with over 300k on it. So a Honda with 100k is still worth fixing. It is also still with something as a trade in. Neither of my old vans were. (that said, I got over 30 hits on my Craig's List ad and sold it easily)
 

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Besides the obvious spool valve ruining the alternator, who replaced the battery? I would look at the workmanship there as well. The clamps must be tight! And never cut off a factory one that won't tighten enough, use a shim. Or replace the whole cable.

I hate making car payments, especially at my advanced age. But I added up the repairs on my last Odyssey and they were far more than the van was worth. But 18 years and 256k was pretty good. Only the last 20-30k were uncomfortable. My daughter is still driving the 2003 we had, with over 300k on it. So a Honda with 100k is still worth fixing. It is also still with something as a trade in. Neither of my old vans were. (that said, I got over 30 hits on my Craig's List ad and sold it easily)
LOL I cut mine off. I had a shim installed and it worked well but I also wanted an extra connection for the amp wire. Besides, the gold bling looks cool!
159015
 
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