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I will say, however, these are a different trans than the 2017 and older vehicles and use totally different fluid. They may not have the same issues with deteriorating fluid like the older models. I don't have any experience with the 2018 and up models as I've never worked on one.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
So our service advisor just called. They changed the sway bar end links but the techs still hear a slight noise. Now they want to change the front left strut assembly. Damn. This is a two year old car. Wtf??
 

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That's because most dealer techs can't diagnose their way out of a wet paper bag. They'll just change parts until they find it. This is why you never take a car there that's outside of warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Damn. That’s really crazy. I always would have thought they’d be the best at fixing their own vehicles.

That's because most dealer techs can't diagnose their way out of a wet paper bag. They'll just change parts until they find it. This is why you never take a car there that's outside of warranty.
 

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Dealerships are where kids fresh out of tech school go for their first mechanic jobs. There are some good techs at some dealerships but there is lots of inexperience too.
 

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Go with the Coopers.I retired from the Cooper plant in Findlay Ohio after 36 years and used their tires on all my vehicles except the new ones I bought that came with the oem tires.Every one of those new cars when the time came to replace the oem tires the Coopers I replaced them with were an improvement over the tires that came off.That includes Goodyears,Pirelli and yes even Michelins which I think are one of the most over rated tire brands in existence.When I had a sidewall blowout on car with only 10,000 miles on it the local Michelin dealer wouldn't honor the warranty because he said I hit something in the road because they don't build a bad tire.I said that's interesting because the tire came from the drivers side rear and I was going down the road about 70 mph so go look at my front drivers tire,I doubt if something jumped between the wheels at that speed don't you think the front tire would show some damage.I told him anybody could build a bad tire even them but he refused to honor the warranty.I put new Coopers on that car[94 Mercury Topaz] at only only 10,000 miles and yes they were an improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thanks. We went with the Coopers
Go with the Coopers.I retired from the Cooper plant in Findlay Ohio after 36 years and used their tires on all my vehicles except the new ones I bought that came with the oem tires.Every one of those new cars when the time came to replace the oem tires the Coopers I replaced them with were an improvement over the tires that came off.That includes Goodyears,Pirelli and yes even Michelins which I think are one of the most over rated tire brands in existence.When I had a sidewall blowout on car with only 10,000 miles on it the local Michelin dealer wouldn't honor the warranty because he said I hit something in the road because they don't build a bad tire.I said that's interesting because the tire came from the drivers side rear and I was going down the road about 70 mph so go look at my front drivers tire,I doubt if something jumped between the wheels at that speed don't you think the front tire would show some damage.I told him anybody could build a bad tire even them but he refused to honor the warranty.I put new Coopers on that car[94 Mercury Topaz] at only only 10,000 miles and yes they were an improvement.
 

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Typically OEM tires last up to 60K with no issues, if maintained properly.
Typically? That's not my experience. I rarely get more than 40-50 out of a set of tires. All tire companies lie about their mileage ratings.
Actually, car companies specially order tires from tire company for their new cars. They are usually a 40K tires. It is the least expansive tires they are willing to pay. You cannot buy 40K tires from anywhere. They choose 40K, because car owner just about not to complain. If your new tires last only 20K to 30K, I am sure you will cry murder. Bridgestone are Japanese, they use harder rubber, last longer but don't stick to road. Ask any motor cyclist rider, and they will tell you the difference between Japanese and non Japanese motor cycle tires. That is hell and heaven.
 

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Ok we have a 2019 Odyssey Elite. Our van is at Honda service right now so I can’t remember off the top of my head but I think we are near 50,000 miles. We have taken several long road trips with the van.
So we took the van in because we started getting a clunking sound from the front while driving down the road or hitting bumps. You could even slightly feel it in the steering wheel. This occurred all of a sudden one night after going over a speed bump, albeit very slowly. This speed bump is at my son’s school and my wife has to drive over it every day, but she takes it very slow over it. I took it slow the night the clunking sound started too.
So Honda calls us today and says they think it’s the sway bar. It is covered under warranty. They also recommended a cabin and engine air filter change. The filters seemed reasonable. We live in a high pollen/dust area so it wouldn’t shock me those need changed. They also recommended a transmission fluid change. Is that standard procedure at this point?
They also said we need new tires. This one kinda shocked me. I haven’t visually looked at the tire tread lately but they told my wife they are pretty bad. They are the original stock Bridgestone. Is it normal for tires on the Odyssey to be shot after just two years? That seems like a really short time for tires. Also, they quoted us $680 for the Coopers because they have a buy 3 get 1 free. But the Bridgestone would be $908. Are Coopers good for an Odyssey or is it best to stick with Bridgestone if we decide to change them out?
Just want to make sure these maintenance items are normal for an Odyssey, one that’s only slightly over 2 years old. Thanks.
Sway bars are very simple devices, basically a long steel bar that has a few bends in it. There really is nothing to go wrong except for it to break. They don't break that easily. Maybe they meant the sway bar bushings or end links? Those are relatively cheap and easy to fix.

If you have never changed the cabin air filter or engine air filter before, you are WAY over due. Depending on driving conditions the engine air filter will lose efficiency after 20k miles. Same thing for the cabin air filter. Truth is that changing these filters is so easy, I would NEVER pay dealer prices to have them do it. You can buy the two filters for about $40 and it will take no more than 10 minutes to change each one.

At 50k miles you are also over due for a transmission fluid change. You should really change the fluid ever 30k miles.

You judge tire wear by miles, not time. 50k miles from a set of tires is really good when you consider how heavy this car is. How long did you think tires would last? I got right around 50k from my first set of tires. My second set looks like it will last 50k miles too. $680 for 4 tires sounds on the high side, which is expected from a dealer. Shop around and I am sure you can get good tires for at least $100 less. If you are a costco member, they usually have good deals and they have a great warranty.

Overall it sure sounds like you have not been paying attention to the maintenance schedule. Unless you drive very few miles, most maintenance is by mileage. I hope you have been changing your oil when the maintenance minder tells you to do it. With 50k miles you should have had at least6 oil changes. When those ere done they should have been checking your tires and filters.
 

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I believe our service rep said these are coming with 2 year of road hazard warranty. It may sound silly, but our Honda dealership is a 40 minute drive for us. I normally go with Discount Tire, but strangely they don’t do alignments. So my understanding is you normally want to have an alignment done when you get new tires. I don’t know of any independent or chain places that I can trust with alignments. I usually trust the dealer to handle certain things. My wife and I didn’t want to drive 40 mins each way just to get an alignment done for tires I would buy somewhere else. It’s an all day process sometimes to go to the dealership. So we figured as a matter of convenience to just have everything knocked out at once while it is at the dealership. I know that’s probably silly to most people, but time/convenience is a factor for us.
If your current tires wore evenly, there is no need to get an alignment when you get new tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
It was the sway bar end links. At first she just told us sway bar but later said links. That ended up not completely fixing the issue. They had to change the entire front left strut assembly which fixed the issue. I do in fact pay attention to the mx alerts. We have had our oil changed on time every time the reminder comes on. Our service advisor said she was surprised the service department didn’t mention our transmission fluid change needing to be done when we were just in there last month for service. I don’t recall any specific reminder coming on for that though.
our van only has 30,200 miles on it. I couldn’t remember off the top of my head so I said 50,000 in my earlier posts. I thought it had more miles but it’s just over 30,000
Sway bars are very simple devices, basically a long steel bar that has a few bends in it. There really is nothing to go wrong except for it to break. They don't break that easily. Maybe they meant the sway bar bushings or end links? Those are relatively cheap and easy to fix.

If you have never changed the cabin air filter or engine air filter before, you are WAY over due. Depending on driving conditions the engine air filter will lose efficiency after 20k miles. Same thing for the cabin air filter. Truth is that changing these filters is so easy, I would NEVER pay dealer prices to have them do it. You can buy the two filters for about $40 and it will take no more than 10 minutes to change each one.

At 50k miles you are also over due for a transmission fluid change. You should really change the fluid ever 30k miles.

You judge tire wear by miles, not time. 50k miles from a set of tires is really good when you consider how heavy this car is. How long did you think tires would last? I got right around 50k from my first set of tires. My second set looks like it will last 50k miles too. $680 for 4 tires sounds on the high side, which is expected from a dealer. Shop around and I am sure you can get good tires for at least $100 less. If you are a costco member, they usually have good deals and they have a great warranty.

Overall it sure sounds like you have not been paying attention to the maintenance schedule. Unless you drive very few miles, most maintenance is by mileage. I hope you have been changing your oil when the maintenance minder tells you to do it. With 50k miles you should have had at least6 oil changes. When those ere done they should have been checking your tires and filters.
 

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So I just talked to our service advisor. Our Odyssey had 32,200 miles. They say our Bridgestones that came with the car are shot. She said she wasn’t a fan of the Bridgestones and they tend to wear down fast. They currently have a bug 3 get 1 free tire deal. They are recommending the Cooper CS5 Ultra Touring. Any thoughts on these tires? I’m normally a Michelin fan but they don’t have any in stock and they’re significantly more expensive
If you want to evaluate tires, tirerack.com is where to look. I wouldn't buy a set of tires without going there first. I buy my tires at Costco or Sam's Club, because their road hazard warranties are five or six years, and the rest typically have road hazard warranties that last for two years. If you travel much, there are Sam's Club's and Costco's all over the US to get warranty service if needed. It's hard to pay less for tires than what you will pay at warehouse clubs. And their people aren't on commission, so what they tell you is probably reliable.

How far you want to wear down a tire before replacement is a personal decision. Most states require 2/32 inches of tread (the wear bars are flush with the remaining tread) to be legal, and it isn't specified "where", so I would guess it's an average across the tire. You will get better tire wear (and fuel mileage) if you keep the pressure up or add a few psi to the door sticker pressure. More tread = better wet grip. Less tread = better dry grip and slightly better fuel economy. If it's edge wear that's the problem, you can run tires until the edge tread is gone if there's good tread on the rest of the tire. With older tires, If you feel a vibration, look them over carefully, because a new vibnration can be a sign of incipient tire failure. If the steel belt shows, replace immediately. Once that belt is visible you may or may not have several hundred miles before the tire fails completely.
 

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Typically? That's not my experience. I rarely get more than 40-50 out of a set of tires. All tire companies lie about their mileage ratings.
It is not that they lie, there is not a standardized test for that; so they tend to lean on the 'good to be true' side and use it as a marketing strategy.
Our experiences vary; heck even my wife drives differently than I do. She gets more out of tires than I. I also tend to be overcautious and change the tires even if the wear is 'not that bad'. However, when driven 'normally' the 'typical' tire can safely exceed 50K or even 60K (not advised due to legal reasons) with no issues.
 

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It is not that they lie, there is not a standardized test for that; so they tend to lean on the 'good to be true' side and use it as a marketing strategy.
Our experiences vary; heck even my wife drives differently than I do. She gets more out of tires than I. I also tend to be overcautious and change the tires even if the wear is 'not that bad'. However, when driven 'normally' the 'typical' tire can safely exceed 50K or even 60K (not advised due to legal reasons) with no issues.
You are kind with your assessment. And sometimes these assessments are accurate and warranted. But sometimes, especially around large population centers, dealers and others will cheat anyone they think is ignorant about cars. And some are good at it, or not so good at it, from removing refrigerant from a working A/C system and spraying Dytel on the compressor (that one also required an evaporator replacement!), to removing wheel weights and replacing half shafts, to charging for oil filters that were never replaced, or straightening bent body parts and charging insurance companies - or you - for the new parts - to who knows what. Like charging $150 for the diagnosis of a leaking radiator cap, and $38 for that cap (Tire Kingdom)?

This may happen not so much in rural areas, but here in South Florida, we are anything but rural - or generally honest. In Florida. on occasion, the state regs have been drafted by persons other than state employees. The state inspects repair shops from time to time - but the law requires, or used to require, a week's notice prior to these inspections. Go figure.

Here's just one anecdotal bit of "evidence":
About ten years ago my friend took her car to Firestone to fix a slow leak in one tire. The tires were 3+ years old, with a little less than half the tread left. The manager pointed out some very fine weather checking (cracks) on the sidewalls of her tires and told her that the car was unsafe to drive on dry-rotted tires. That dealer would not fix the flat for this reason. Then, because it was unsafe, they would not return her keys. They told her she needed new tires because of this "dry rot". She told Firestone that she could not afford the four new tires, but she acquiesced to buying one new tire. So they agreed to give her car back with two new front tires. I guess the two back tires were safe and the front ones were not? Of course!

She asked Firestone to save the old tires so I could come look at them, and they agreed to do that. I went there first thing the next morning and her old tires were gone. They told me they were picked up overnight by the "recycler", although there were a number of used tires laying around out back. Of course!

I asked my friend to take her car to another local tire store, Tires Plus. They told her the same thing, and tried to sell her two new rear tires! Why not?

Dry rot is caused by microorganisms in organic fabrics like cotton and linen in the presence of excess moisture. The use of cotton and linen in tires went out maybe 75 years ago. All modern tires use synthetic fibers that are immune to dry rot. If you do your homework you will find that no tire manufacturer warrants a tire against weather checking, which is primarily caused by ozone and UV light, and will happen to (almost?) all tires exposed to the weather. The Motor Home Association of America used to have, and may still have, some information on its web site regarding weather checking, which bears out what I have said here.

Now - the rest of the story! I contacted Firestone about this and they were not pleased with my friend's experience. We sent them a copy of the invoice for the two Firestone tires, and they send her a check for the full invoice amount. What she then decided to do, was to get four new, matched, grand touring tires at Sam's Club. She discard the two brand new (el cheapo) Firestone tires.

So - it's nice to have faith in the integrity of the man who fixes your cars, but here in South Florida most of the dealers I know about have pulled one scam or another on people I have known. That includes the local Honda dealer, the Toyota dealer, the Chrysler dealer, the GMC/Chevrolet dealer, and the previous owners of the local Ford dealership. That Toyota dealer tried to replace half shafts on a car that was still under warranty - at customer expense!

And there's independents who have practice these tricks too - like the disenfranchised Rusty Jones dealer who had a stack of left over Rusty Jones paperwork. He used this paperwork with a brand x product - improperly - so these vehicles eventually rusted out. We found out about this when a treated vehicle rusted out. The local Buick dealership helped to discover the fraud. But that dealer still would not "fix" the rust without charge. Even the local Sears Tire Store was into these practices at one point. Buy some new tires there and your wheel alignment might leave the shop out of adjustment, with no attempt to cover up the wrench marks!

By reading over these forums, even if you have no interest in fixing your cars yourself, you will learn a little, which goes a long way to protecting yourself from dishonest dealers that are likely found everywhere. Some of the nicest people turn out to be grifters, you know.

So you don't get the idea that I think all repair shops and dealers are less than honest, I have several local shops I can send people where they will get honest billing and repairs, my local Pep Boys being one of these. You may learn these things when friends tell you how they were NOT overcharged or in any way misled. But be careful. The local Toyota guys are always doing little things for free, especially for the ladies, and then - wham!
 
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