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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My ground wire going from the ( - ) battery terminal to the engine has corroded completely off at the junction of the eye terminal and the bare copper strand. The eye is attached deep down, in the vicinity of the transmission fluid dipstick. Car will not start, unable to shift out of Park. Fuses all OK, most everything in car runs (except the starter...)

The car is not in a location where it can be towed, and I can't do the replacement of the ground wire harness where the car is now, really need to get engine started and the car moved.

Can I attach a temporary jumper from the ( - ) battery terminal to somewhere temporarily to get the car started and not blow the electronics?
 

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Almost any bolt connection on the engine should make the starter work.
Heck, I think you could just use a jumper cable ( or similar) to jump from the neg bat post to a bolt (or similar ) to get it started. Remember, the starter draws a LOT of amperage so do NOT use a thin 12 gauge type wire.
You could also connect it to the radiator frame which has the semi-bare area on a heavy wire which connects to the motor that you are supposed to use when jumpstarting an Ody.
Buffalo4
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Almost any bolt connection on the engine should make the starter work.
Heck, I think you could just use a jumper cable ( or similar) to jump from the neg bat post to a bolt (or similar ) to get it started. Remember, the starter draws a LOT of amperage so do NOT use a thin 12 gauge type wire.
You could also connect it to the radiator frame which has the semi-bare area on a heavy wire which connects to the motor that you are supposed to use when jumpstarting an Ody.
Buffalo4
Funny thing, that... I just replaced that engine/chassis wire a few days ago because it was about to give way, didn't notice the corroding engine block ground strap...

Can I jump to get started and then remove while driving (well, actually BEFORE driving...)?
 

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Funny thing, that... I just replaced that engine/chassis wire a few days ago because it was about to give way, didn't notice the corroding engine block ground strap...

Can I jump to get started and then remove while driving (well, actually BEFORE driving...)?
Your engine electricals like the plugs need a ground path back to the battery. Not as robust as for the starter, but still......
 

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I caught mine just before it failed.
159210
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
kernel: Nice pic! How did you get that close? It looks like I would need a 14" socket extension to get to the bolt.

BTW: What sized bolt is that?
 

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Zoom.
Either 10 or 12mm, I don't remember. I just reached down to get to to the bolt, maybe with a short extension.
 

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Your engine electricals like the plugs need a ground path back to the battery. Not as robust as for the starter, but still......
I believe 'most' engine electricals use a different ground points than using the block, which the starter uses.
Still, things like temp switches etc do use the engine block for ground.
Remember this is just a very temp fix just so wagnerp 'might; be able to drive it home or to a garage. AFTER the engine is running, even a small 12ga wire from the neg post to the engine block ( any easily accessible nut or bolt should work) should keep the electricals going. Use the key unlock slot to get the shifter out of Park, if it won't come out otherwise.
Buffalo4
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OP/ Just for closure & future searchers:

1) I was able to replace the ground strap with all of your help, and a bit of YouTube research. Needed 20" socket extension initially and then shorter extension once I could get my hands way down under. All the nuts/bolts involved in the ground strap replacement were 10mm BTW.

2) Before replacing, I was able to start the car with a jumper cable from the battery ( - ) terminal to the bare copper wire ground between the fan housing and the engine block. The car CONTINUED to run, and was fully drivable with this jumper removed. The battery ( - ) ground wire had a branch that went to the chassis, which was apparently enough to keep all systems go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why does Honda configure these ground wires with bare stranded copper? So that you can inspect for corrosion (which might be hidden with coated wire) and replace before disaster strikes?
 

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Why does Honda configure these ground wires with bare stranded copper? So that you can inspect for corrosion (which might be hidden with coated wire) and replace before disaster strikes?
Let me guess. Cheaper, and yet lasts 20 years +/-. My prioritization for durability improvements on a 2001 would have focused on the tranny. But that's just me.
 

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Let me guess. Cheaper, and yet lasts 20 years +/-. My prioritization for durability improvements on a 2001 would have focused on the tranny. But that's just me.
When I replaced my negative cable on my 01 because the gauges would die for a moment if I took my foot off the gas quickly, I wrapped the bare section with self-fusing silicone tape.

I can’t imagine that Honda would save much of anything by skipping the last few inches of insulation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have now been told the explanation of the bare-end grounding wire is improved flexibility / resistance to motion damage, and improved current-carrying ability of a braid vs solid wire (eg starter current can be maybe 150-200A initially).

The green patina oxidation on the copper is actually a protective insulator.

I think the Achilles Heel of these ground wires is the eye junction, possibly vibration-induced mechanical breakdown at the flexible/inflexible interface of the end of the crimp and maybe copper electrolysis with whatever the terminal is made of (doesn't look like copper or brass).

As one who has done wire rigging for boats and gymnastics rigs, I think the crimp could be done better. But replacing every 20 years / 200,000 miles isn't such a bad job, either...
 
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