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They are fine still but I don't put alot of miles on the van. They are a must for full passenger load. One spring squeaks occasionally but quiets down after I rustproof the underside. IIRC I measured the stance before and after the install and it was about an inch higher than before.

Other options are KYB and Airlifts.
 

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I don't drive a whole lot loaded with passengers. I do carry our 90lbs Golden Retriever in the trunk on occasion. For towing and hauling we have our '13 Tundra... But than I kind of like the idea of longevity and taller rear stance as long as they do not turn the Van into much harsher ride.

Decisions, decisions...
 

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I'd go with the KYB's. I've replaced several OEM shocks on Altima's, Sentra's, Toyota's and i've been very impressed with the KYB's. I'm about to do all x4 shocks/strucks on my 04 ody when the weather get's warmer. Monroe's are decent but don't last very long.
 

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I used the Monroe Sensatrac Load-adjusting Shocks and they installed fine and ride fine. I haven't put many miles on them, under 5k miles, so no opinion on life span.
Buffalo4
 

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I used the Monroe Sensatrac Load-adjusting Shocks and they installed fine and ride fine. I haven't put many miles on them, under 5k miles, so no opinion on life span.
Buffalo4
Are your Load-Adjusting Sensatracs bouncy in the rear over speed bumps? That was my experience -- did not seem like the damping rates matched the OEM rear springs.
 

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OEM suck. You can feel the difference when you take them off. My van is at 166K and needs shocks again. I have never had a vehicle wear out rear shocks like the Ody.

I have had OEM - suck. Lasted about 35K
Monroe load adjusters - the best and lasted the longest. However, if you don't tow, they will raise the rear stance of your vehicle. Lasted about 70K

Gabrielle - about 10% better than OEM. have lasted about 50K. I need to replace them and the springs.
Do we have two SlickWily among us? I know the one who moved on and purchased Quest. His Odyssey was a lemon with a voracious appetite for gas,
 

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About 3 years and 40,000 miles on the Monroe SensaTrac Load Adjusting shock absorbers I fitted to our 2002 EX and 2003 EX. They are holding up well, still damping well. My impressions:

-- Like sickwilly noted, they do raise the rear end a little bit on an empty van.
-- Both vans have OEM hitches; both used to drag on moderately inclined driveways. The Monroes fixed this problem.
-- Like Ron777 noted, they are bouncy over speed bumps if it's just me in the van. Put in my family of six, bouncy-feeling goes away.
-- I have Air Lifts, too, but for daily use I only keep them air'd up enough (5, maybe 10 psi) to keep them from going flat (i.e., not in use).
-- Tongue weight on my trailer with 18-foot bass boat is not too heavy; when I hook it up, I don't need the Air Lifts, van is level
-- Boat + 6 people, lake stuff in luggage well, coolers in boat, tongue weight goes up, Monroes need a tiny bit of Air Lift help to stay level

Local roads in my area are terrible. Tires, shocks and springs get a horrendous workout where I live. My OEM springs have had it, many thousands of cycles, often severe service (yes, before the Monroes and Air Lifts I've hit the bump stops more than a few times :( ). OEM shocks were leaking badly when I replaced them at around 100,000 miles (IIRC) on both vans. I should've replaced the OEM shocks years, years earlier, as they had been thoroughly beaten to death and the ride on both vans was horrible.

Well, on our last road trip in December 2014, I noticed that with my family of six, no roof cargo box, luggage in back...and the van had a slight nose-up attitude. Weak OEM springs, gotta get new ones. Without the Monroes SensaTrac Load Adjusting shocks, I would have been pulling a wheelie, and I had to air up the Air Lifts to 22 psi to get it level again.

My conditions are pretty unique...as in uniquely severe road conditions, and heavy towing when I tow. If I lived in an area with even half-decent roads, either Monroes or Air Lifts would be fine (both are NOT needed under nearly all circumstances).

sontakke, our sickwilly is one of Odyclub's boat-towing, happy Ody owners. wild willy was our local curmudgeon who's lead-footed wifey pooh got 9.67 mpg in the city, and he switched to a Quest. Short answer: different willys!


OF
 

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Yup no two sickwilly's here. I should have never named myself that. It was a left over nickname from a forum where I did not want to be know. Hey, check out what I will pull with the Odyssey some this summer:

http://i1378.photobucket.com/albums/ah104/rjiannelli/Mobile Uploads/2014-10/74EF6D4A-52CB-4BD0-A8E4-B9BF37EAF37E_zpsu0h1ajuc.jpg

I do have to admit, though, we have test driven a couple of replacements for the Odyssey. We still need to drive the new Odyssey and Sienna. So far we have driven a Flex and Pathfinder.
 

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Hey, check out what I will pull with the Odyssey some this summer:
Is that really a 2001 Ski Nautique? It's in perfect shape. So is the trailer. Previous owner must not have used it often, and kept it garaged.

Another candidate for Monroe Sensa-Trac Load Adjusting shocks, or add Air Lifts to the springs.

sontakke, I still have to do a double take to figure out which willy is posting to the forums :D

OF
 

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Yes, it was quite a find. The prior owner had it for 30 years on a private ski lake. He unfortunately has become ill and cannot waterski anymore, so I adopted it. When I get it behind the Odyssey I will have to add a new pic to the signature.

My wife keeps dragging her feet on picking a new vehicle, so I am about to do more work on our 12 year old Odyssey. I need to do front suspension. Really the only thing wrong with it is that every time I wash it paint comes off. Thus, I don't wash the exterior.

More than likely I will keep towing and keep trying to kill my original tranny :)
 

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If you live where they use salt on the road you will find this job just a little bit more difficult. As with most rusty bolts they can trouble. I broke the welds on the captive nuts when removing the shocks. One side with the air gun, the other with a breaker bar. I used a lot of Parts Buster on both. I was able to get them off using a 19mm open end on the captive. If you tool kit contains 2 cans of Parts Buster, a propane torch, a breaker bar with a 1.5 ft piece of PCP to use use as a breaker bar extension. a hack saw blade, and a dremel with a steel cutting wheel you might be equipped enough to DIY in Minnesota.
 

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If you live where they use salt on the road you will find this job just a little bit more difficult. As with most rusty bolts they can trouble. I broke the welds on the captive nuts when removing the shocks. One side with the air gun, the other with a breaker bar. I used a lot of Parts Buster on both. I was able to get them off using a 19mm open end on the captive. If you tool kit contains 2 cans of Parts Buster, a propane torch, a breaker bar with a 1.5 ft piece of PCP to use use as a breaker bar extension. a hack saw blade, and a dremel with a steel cutting wheel you might be equipped enough to DIY in Minnesota.
I'd just posted a new thread asking questions about this job for those who live with rust.

Do you believe that breaking the captive nut is inevitable for an old odyssey in rust country? How much torque did your impact wrench apply such that you broke the weld on the captive nut? 365 ft-lbs freed the bottom nuts, but didn't budge the top bolt. I suspect that I have the same issue you had. What parts required cutting with hack saw and dremel? I don't want to mess with cutting steel that my power tools have broken.

Thanks!
 
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