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Does the 2007 Honda Odyssey have a serviceable transmission filter or is internal and permanent?


Any help would be greatly appreciated
 

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It's not serviceable at all on the 2007-2010. There is a filter, but it requires the transmission to be removed and disassembled to get at it. Nice right?

Joel
 

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Some may consider installing a Magnefine. But Odyclub member Shall36 posted this on another transmission filter thread, "Any metal particles are going to settle out in the sump, where the magnetic drain plug is located. Cut open a used magnafine and if it's downstream of the factory filter, there won't be much if any junk in there.

Nothing against magnafine, I've used them before, I think there's little value in this situation and may even cause issues given that it is restricting flow. The flow thing isn't a big deal if it's the only filter in the system but in this case, there's already a filter that the pump has to push fluid through."

Then I followed up in support of his observation by posting the pictures below of the autopsy of my Magnefine 2 years after installation.

I am surprised that his persuasive take on the Magnefine didn't get much response on the other thread. I am thinking that maybe it just got overlooked somehow. If he is right, it sure would save a lot of trouble; ie, finding the return line (and maybe choosing the feed line by mistake), cutting and splicing in the Mag, possible leaks, changing every year or so, etc. Lotta work if the filter isn't doing anything.

 

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Shall36 made a good point that a Magnefine is redundant as a filter, but IMHO he missed the two advantages of installing a Magnefine:

1. Easier to change than the OE filter, so more likely to get changed regularly (and it's cheaper then the OE filter).
2. Traps ferrous particles that the OE filter cannot, and better IMHO than the magnetic drain plug.

Your Magnefine looks great. How many miles driven in those two years? hat's your city/highway ratio?

Dave
 

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It was about 18k (9 or so per year) miles of mostly city driving, probably 75%. Yes, the Mag had no debris in its pleats and the powerful magnet was oily but virtually metal-free. You can see it better if you click on the updated pictures here. I noticed that the others I sent could not be enlarged.

Mag small.jpg Mag 2 small.jpg
 

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Shall36 made a good point that a Magnefine is redundant as a filter, but IMHO he missed the two advantages of installing a Magnefine:

1. Easier to change than the OE filter, so more likely to get changed regularly (and it's cheaper then the OE filter).
2. Traps ferrous particles that the OE filter cannot, and better IMHO than the magnetic drain plug.

Your Magnefine looks great. How many miles driven in those two years? hat's your city/highway ratio?

Dave
I think point 1 is valid but I would push back on point 2, at least until or unless filter specs can be produced.

So I did some research and it looks like the '05/'06 models have the filter on the return leg to the sump. What that means is that you could put a magnafine on the backside of the cooler and filter the fluid before it hits the OEM fluid. In theory, this would keep the OEM filter from getting plugged up with contamination, which would be a really good thing for those '07+ units where the filter can't be serviced easily. But, as the article in the link below points out, most of the junk that's in a transmission is there from initial break-in, so unless the magnafine is installed right when the unit goes into service, all of that junk will get into the OEM filter and with regular fluid changes, there won't be a lot of additional junk to worry about, relatively speaking.

As to point 2 above, that would only be true if either the magnafilter design is superior to the OEM design or the magnafine can filter out smaller particles. I found a reference that indicates the magnafine can filter down to 30 microns. I don't have specs for the OEM filter, but both filters are of the same type (pleated cartridge).

The benefit of the magnafine is likely greatest when the trans unit uses an in-pan screen or an in-pan gauze filter, as both of those devices are coarse filters (meaning that the magnafine would filter out much smaller particles). Both of these types of filters are also on the sump side, meaning that fluid is sucked through them and not pushed through them. My concern with the magnafine is that it adds a second fluid restriction point which may reduce flow and cause increased line pressure upstream of the filters. An automatic transmission is basically a big fluid pump so anything that messes with flow or pressure could have negative effects. Applications with a course filter in the sump would seem better suited to the magnafine as the sump screens are too coarse to restrict fluid flow (unless it gets clogged with debris) and the magnafine is much more fine than any coarse sump filter so it definitely will filter out more junk than the sump filters.

For what it's worth, I did use a magnafine on my Tundra, which used a coarse screen in the sump as a filter.

This analysis is worth what you paid for it and I could be totally wrong. :D

Tranny Filter Tech
 

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Good stuff, Shall. I think we Ody owners, especially 2nd gen, are so anxious (and sometimes rightfully so) about our trannys that we tend to over compensate. If indeed the Magnefine turns out to be more or less a placebo on 05's and 06's, then that is one less step to worry over. Hope we get more folks weighing in on this.

BTW, I think you meant to say "...before it hits the OEM filter" (not fluid) at the end of the 2nd sentence of your second paragraph.
 

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Good stuff, Shall. I think we Ody owners, especially 2nd gen, are so anxious (and sometimes rightfully so) about our trannys that we tend to over compensate. If indeed the Magnefine turns out to be more or less a placebo on 05's and 06's, then that is one less step to worry over. Hope we get more folks weighing in on this.

BTW, I think you meant to say "...before it hits the OEM filter" (not fluid) at the end of the 2nd sentence of your second paragraph.
Yep...exactly.

From my experience, the best maintenance you can do on a trans is to use Amsoil fluid. I've found the 15K fluid change intervals with Amsoil will eventually get you to a point where virtually no junk shows up in the pan. On the Ody, since there is no pan, my fluid looks almost new at my changes.
 

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Yep...exactly.

From my experience, the best maintenance you can do on a trans is to use Amsoil fluid. I've found the 15K fluid change intervals with Amsoil will eventually get you to a point where virtually no junk shows up in the pan. On the Ody, since there is no pan, my fluid looks almost new at my changes.
I will never trust any oil that claims 15k fluid interval, nor will i ever trust a oil manufacturer that basically uses MLM scheming to be a "dealer" of their product. All the literature is written from them too......and no, i do not beleive fluid looking almost new at any change other than 5min warm up. I've done rebuilds, gotten rebuilds, and changed enough fluids to know this isn't true.

More proof? I had a client get a motor built from us that went for 35k miles and across the USA 3x in a row without issue, oil used? Castrol and Mobil1 (Depending on which special was going).....it was fine when it was coming in for regular care and oil changes and such......he then became a AMSOil dealer and used it in the car since he got it all for cheap, 1 year later he blew the engine after trying to do a roadsid fix, apparently EZ Lube changed some fluids and a belt...a few blocks down his crank pulley fell off the car and then he tried to use a tire iron...failed and motor spun out of time, head blown up. Surprise! Camshaft had pitting, galling, sent to WebCamshafts for inspection....cheap oil being used in car.
 

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TSM...was referencing Amsoil ATF. 15k intervals with that is probably overkill. Never had an issue with their oil either, but to each their own.
 

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So I did some research and it looks like the '05/'06 models have the filter on the return leg to the sump. What that means is that you could put a magnafine on the backside of the cooler and filter the fluid before it hits the OEM fluid. In theory, this would keep the OEM filter from getting plugged up with contamination, which would be a really good thing for those '07+ units where the filter can't be serviced easily.
Yes, it's the same for Gen 2 5-speeds. Filtered ATF would always flow into the OE filter so the latter would last forever.

As to point 2 above, that would only be true if either the magnafilter design is superior to the OEM design or the magnafine can filter out smaller particles. I found a reference that indicates the magnafine can filter down to 30 microns. I don't have specs for the OEM filter, but both filters are of the same type (pleated cartridge).
I'm no metallurgist by any means, but I think the ferrous particles in the ATF that come from bearings, gears, and clutch pack steelies are smaller than any filter can trap. That's why the stuff that's on your ATF drain plug magnet is like paste. So the magnet in the Magnefine will attract and hold them out of the ATF.

The same situation with ferrous particles exists with engine oil. However the difference is that engine bearing clearances are much greater than many automatic transmission's moving parts. So the particles circulate harmlessly in an engine, while the same size particles can bind an AT valve. Once hydraulic pressure to the clutches is reduced, delayed, or obstructed, wear on the clutch packs increases rapidly, and then transmission failure follows.

Dave
 

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Lotta work if the filter isn't doing anything.
Your Magnefine is the main AT filter. The OE filter is downstream from it. It's clean because of good maintenance and a healthy transmission, not because it's not working.

Dave
 

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I had replaced the oem inline honda cooler filter with a magnafilter on my honda insight. Sometimes when I parked I thought my car was leaking something, but dismissed it as the AC. Well, went to change my engine oil and found the magnafilter filter was leaking. I had even mounted it in the same mount the oem filter used. :huh: I went back to the oem filter and no leaking issues.

I may buy one of those and use it on this van, but with the miles already on it its likely the worse of the wear has found places to settle inside the case.

Amsoil huh? I got an Amsoil story for you. My father was very anal about lubes for his 1982 VW Rabbit. He used all things Amsoil, even an Amsoil air filter. One day he went to check the filter and notice it had dropped in the filter box letting unfiltered air into the engine.

He used to test the oil vs change it. After about 40k miles and another 20 bucks they said the oil was too dirty to read and suggested he changed it. :nothappy:

So about 15 years later the paint was flat red, the gear selector was like moving a stick around in a bucket of pudding and he was burning a qt of oil every 500 miles. Had 300k miles on the car. The 1985 Golf Diesel he had did 200k before the engine quit starting due to lack of compression and used castor oil. The Golf sheered 5th gear and became a 4 speed, the Rabbit was crushed by a tree when the big hurricane came though in the late 90s.
 

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I went to advance auto, they say no filter as its not serviceable. I go to rockauto and they have the small cylinder shaped element with 2 o rings, a black screw on one and one that looks like a fitting. :huh:
 

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I went to advance auto, they say no filter as its not serviceable. I go to rockauto and they have the small cylinder shaped element with 2 o rings, a black screw on one and one that looks like a fitting. :huh:
2007 ATF Filter part # 25450-P4V-013 and filter cap o-ring is 91305-PN4-003

Fromt diagrams looks like the 07 is either inside the transmission, inside the housing or outside the housing to the left of the ATF cooler hoses.

For 05-06 Models it is external, and the ATF filter is 25450-RAY-003 and then the cap o-ring is 91301-RAY-004 and then the filter seal is 91302-RAY-003
 

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I need to get it on the ramps to check that out first hand. Its too low to anything but undo the drain plugs for changing oils. I am working on the 3x3 tranny service. The drip stick had a brownish stain to it when I checked the fluid level. The former owner said they just did a drain and fill before I got the van. I found the drain plug needed a good wiping as it was full of silt like material. The fluid that drained out was reddish, but the new fluid was like a neon red in color. The fill plug had the same stain on it with a light coating of silt.
 

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I thought it was under the brake brain box which is under the air cleaner?
It is on 2005 and 2006 Odys. In 2007 they put a different transmission in (took it from Honda Ridgeline pickup truck).
2007-2010 Odys have the filter inside the transmission case. You need to remove and disassemble transmission to get it replaced. Quick way to identify your tranny is to look at the tranny drain plug. On 2005-2006, the plug is on
the driver's side, 2007-2010 have it on the other, passenger side of the transmission case. I have a 2005 EX, replaced that filter about 4 weeks ago. It did not look too bad. Plan to do that every 30,000 miles or so, the filter is about $9.00 at AutoZone and Advance Auto stores, OEM Honda filter is about $15. I bought both and they look identical. Probably made in the same sweatshop.
 
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