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Hi party people! I just wanted to share my story, and I hope that it helps somebody in the future...

2011 Honda Odyssey EX-L RES with 235/65r17. The TPMS dash light was on and off sporadically several months ago, and then off for a couple months. About a month ago it came back and was on all the time. My assumption was a bad TPMS sensor...

Around the same time, I decided it was time to upgrade to a set of winter wheels & tires. Purchased a set of salvage 17" aluminum wheels from a local yard ($250), a set of "OEM" TPMS sensors from eBay (seller: sae-auto), the ATEQ QuickSet TPMS Reset Tool, and, finally, ordered some Bridgestone Blizzak WS-80s from BJ's (~$500 after coupons). I removed the TPMS sensors from the salvage wheels, cleaned the sensor seat and tire beads really well, and installed the new sensors.

I used the ATEQ to push the new IDs to the car. After doing so, the TPMS light went out, but I was greeted with a new dash light... the low tire pressure light was flashing. Of course, no mention in the owner's manual. I started digging around here and found a couple other people who had the same flashing light. My conclusion was that I needed to install the new wheels/tires and then drive for a certain distance at a certain speed. The new sensors would initialize/wake up and the car would again begin tracking tire pressures.

Well, today was the day I took the car to BJ's to get the new tires installed. The tech noticed the flashing low pressure light after installation, but his assumption was the same as mine (drive distance/speed). So we left and my wife drove the car home (~6 miles - should be far enough). The first question I ask her afterwards was, of course, "did that stupid light go off?!" The answer was a emphatic, "NO!" I proceeded to take the car for a 20 mile drive and the light continued to flash. I again poked around on here, but was not able to find a definitive solution. So, I headed back to BJ's to chat with the tech.

The tech was super-nice and helpful. He brought his TPMS tool (Bartech Tech400SD) out to the car. First he was able to confirm each sensor was awake and reading the pressure (phew, didn't get screwed by eBay seller). I'm not entirely sure what he did next (will call tomorrow to say thanks and see if I can get more information), but I believe he re-initialized or reset the new sensor IDs in the ECU. Upon doing so, his tool spit out the following message:

IMG_20181210_162844 (Small).jpg

"After writing IDs, the TPMS symbol will blink. Drop the tire pressure on any replacement sensor to 5 psi, inflate to correct pressure, and drive the vehicle until the light goes off."

He pulled the van back into the bay, performed the inflation drop on one (? - will try to confirm) tire, and brought the van back out front. Sure enough, the light stopped blinking within the first couple minutes of (slow) driving! I sure hope it remains this way throughout the winter. Then, come spring, I can jump through the same hoops when I try to get the (new) summer sensors initialized for the first time.

I will try to get some more information for everyone tomorrow and will report back.

The tl;dr version: push new sensor IDs, install wheels & drive to initialize sensors, (maybe) re-push sensors IDs, deflate tire(s) to 5 psi and then re-inflate, drive away and prosper!

-ace
 

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Hmmm, I do quite a bit of TPMS work and recently had the most unpleasant experience with 2007 Honda Odyssey EX sensor replacement.
I wonder if this was the ticket?

Had an 2007 Odyssey with bad TPMS sensor (battery was dead).
Bought new TPMS sensor from Honda Dealer, installed it, reprogrammed the car with my Autel 906TS.
The TPMS malfunction blinking light came on. Same deal, drove it a bit, it should have gone off, but it did not.
Reprogrammed with Autel DS708, same deal. Wasted hours talking to dealer, third party sellers, etc...
At the end of the day, gave up and went to AAP and bought VDO brand sensor, installed it and was done in 15mins.
Did not need to drop tire pressure or anything like that.
I was able to exchange the TPMS sensor at honda dealer for a new one.

Did the car needed to be running when you deflated the tire? The autel tools do not have the message you reference, and neither does official honda procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just spoke with the tech, and have some more information:

He thinks he didn't get the message about lowering the tire pressure the first time around because he entered the van as a 2010 in the tool (based on door jamb manufacture date). After I drove around and came back, he did the "re-learn" procedure on the Tech400SD for a 2011. That's when he received the message about lowering the tire pressure.

He lowered the front two tire pressures to 5 psi and then re-inflated, both while the car was ON. Timeline-wise, from that point he brought it back around front, turned if off, gave me the keys, and it was on my first drive (only 1 minute) or just after starting the next time that I noticed the flashing dash light was off.

With all the problem stories I've read, it's no wonder Honda moved away from in-tire sensors..... :rollingeyes:
 

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I wasn't aware they weren't using tpms sensors in the wheels anymore. Did they go to the wheel speed sensor based system like VW has been using? It uses changes in the speed of each wheel to sense a low tire. If they went to that then it was likely because it was cheaper (just a software algorithm while monitoring wheel speed which the PCM already does,) not because of any problems with sensors. Problems with tpms sensors that are not sensor-battery related are pretty rare.
 

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For the record, as stated, my story is about 2007 Odyssey with 42753-SHJ-A82 sensor.
It does look like 11+ use different sensor part number, so perhaps the programming instructions are also slightly different.
You definitely cant use door jamb manufacture date in these cases. Model Year (MY) is typically on the sticker under the hood.
For what its worth, I concluded that it was a bad Honda sensor. I was able to ping it with my tool and it definitely responded with battery and pressure info.
The snug was with the fact that the car would not be able to communicate with the sensor.
I monitored live tpms data while driving (safely) and car was not able to pick up info about the sensor.

The whole experience makes me shudder again, I would expect aftermarket sensors to misbehave, but never would peg a bad Honda part.
Even the dealer complained about how many different sensor parts there are for Honda.

I even considered for a second that the EX had self learning touring sensors somehow.
What a mess.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wasn't aware they weren't using tpms sensors in the wheels anymore. Did they go to the wheel speed sensor based system like VW has been using? It uses changes in the speed of each wheel to sense a low tire. If they went to that then it was likely because it was cheaper (just a software algorithm while monitoring wheel speed which the PCM already does,) not because of any problems with sensors. Problems with tpms sensors that are not sensor-battery related are pretty rare.
John, I concur... The changeover was more for them than it was for the consumer. Here's a description I found in blog post on a Honda dealer's website:

Indirect TPMS
[FONT=&quot]New for some Honda vehicles starting in 2013, indirect TPMS uses the vehicle’s ABS/VSA (Anti-lock Braking System/Vehicle Stability Assist) wheel speed sensors to calculate tire pressure. This method looks for changes in rotation or resonance that indicates low tire pressure. The system requires calibration any time the tire pressure is adjusted, if a tire is replaced, or if tires have been rotated. Vehicles with indirect TPMS have a calibration button located in the vehicle to initiate the calibration sequence. As of this post Honda models that have indirect TPMS include the 2013-2014 Accord, 2014 Civic, 2014 CR-V and 2015 Fit.[/FONT]
 

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Following up to my own thread with some updates now that I have made the switch over to summer tires (technically I switched sometime in March, but have more notes now that I've thrown more money at the problem)...

These F%$*ING TPMS sensors are such a pain in the ass and are the bane of my existence!!!!!!

I installed new sensors and tires on the factory wheels. The sensors were from the same order as my winter tires (eBay seller: sae-auto). I pushed the new codes to the ECU using the ATEQ QuickSet tool. Sure enough, back to the flashing low tire pressure light. I tried multiple combinations/sequences of pushing the codes, lowering the tire pressure, cycling the key, etc to no avail. It was to the point where I was worried one of the sensors was bad...

Foolishly (?) I gave ATEQ more money and bought the VT31. The tool confirmed that all four sensors were initialized, batteries OK, and at proper pressure and temperature. Thinking maybe the sensors needed to be initialized by the tool I went through the various combinations/sequences above, but am still stuck with a flashing low tire pressure light.

At this point I'm beyond frustrated and out of ideas... As anal as I am, I don't see myself chasing down a solution with any more money. Well, maybe $0.01 of black electrical tape to cover up the stupid light...

-ace
 

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Update: a strange conclusion (?) to this story... Popped in the Ody the other day with the family, started to drive, looked down, and the damn light was off!? It only took ~6 months and ~9k miles of driving (and watching that stupid light flash). For the life of me, I can't explain why the light went off; maybe it burnt out...

And, of course, the light goes off ~1 month before I need to swap back to winter tires. I hope I don't get a repeat of what happened in the spring...

-ace
 
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