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Discussion Starter #1
Have never owned snow tires in my life so could use some guidance on what I need out of snow tires and wheels. If there are any specs I should look for etc. Thanks.
 

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Ideally, a separate set of wheels with winter tires mounted. You'll get different opinions on WHICH tires. I generally start with TireRack and use either stock wheel/tire size or try to go down an inch in diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ideally, a separate set of wheels with winter tires mounted. You'll get different opinions on WHICH tires. I generally start with TireRack and use either stock wheel/tire size or try to go down an inch in diameter.
Is there a reason why you go down an inch in diameter?
 

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Is there a reason why you go down an inch in diameter?
Smaller rim diameter tires are cheaper. The smallest rim size you can use on a gen 4 Odyssey is 17 inches - any smaller and you'll have trouble clearing the brakes and suspension.
 

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Smaller rim diameter tires are cheaper. The smallest rim size you can use on a gen 4 Odyssey is 17 inches - any smaller and you'll have trouble clearing the brakes and suspension.
Good to know. If there's no loss of safety or drive quality by going down from the 18" stock to 17" wheels and tires than I see no reason not to do that, perhaps other than aesthetic?
 

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Just read reviews for winter tires available for your vehicle on TireRack and Discount Tire Direct to see which ones have positive reviews. That being said, virtually any dedicated winter tire will make a huge difference in the winter compared to even the best all season tire. It's a night and day difference. Even on wet roads when the temp is below 40 you will have significantly increased traction.

I agree with gobluetwo that having a separate set of winter wheels/tires is the way to go if your budget allows it. I had a set of winter wheels/tires for our 2018 Pacifica we traded in with Bridgestone Blizzak's on it and they did very well.
 

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Good to know. If there's no loss of safety or drive quality by going down from the 18" stock to 17" wheels and tires than I see no reason not to do that, perhaps other than aesthetic?
That's right.

My winter tires are mounted on black steel rims - cheap as can be. I bought a set of 2015 LX wheel covers from my friendly neighbourhood Honda dealer and for the 6-7 months we use winter tires my van looks like a perfectly stock LX. That's about as far as I'm willing to go to indulge aesthetics on wheels that are going to spend 95% of the time covered in snow, mud, grime and road salt.
 

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Good to know. If there's no loss of safety or drive quality by going down from the 18" stock to 17" wheels and tires than I see no reason not to do that, perhaps other than aesthetic?
Ride quality will likely improve somewhat because the taller sidewall will flex and take some additional impact. By the same token, handling will suffer somewhat as the sidewall flexes when cornering, etc. Most people don't drive their Odysseys like speed racer, particularly in winter, so I think it's a good tradeoff. The other thing to note is that winter tires, in my experience at least, tend to be a bit louder than most all-season or summer tires because of the blockier tread pattern and siping. No big deal to me, but just an FYI.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just read reviews for winter tires available for your vehicle on TireRack and Discount Tire Direct to see which ones have positive reviews. That being said, virtually any dedicated winter tire will make a huge difference in the winter compared to even the best all season tire. It's a night and day difference. Even on wet roads when the temp is below 40 you will have significantly increased traction.

I agree with gobluetwo that having a separate set of winter wheels/tires is the way to go if your budget allows it. I had a set of winter wheels/tires for our 2018 Pacifica we traded in with Bridgestone Blizzak's on it and they did very well.
A couple years ago I had a work vehicle, Ford Transit to be precise, that drove like it was on ice skates on ice and snow...and the day my employer put snow tires on it I felt I could have driven up the face of a mountain without slipping. I became an instant believer. Haven't felt the need to buy any for my truck, but after having 2 babies over the past 2 years and upgrading my wife's SUV to an Ody I feel the extra safety and confidence for the family on the road is well worth the expense of dedicated winter tires and wheels.

Any suggestions on wheels, or is that mostly an aesthetic decision?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ride quality will likely improve somewhat because the taller sidewall will flex and take some additional impact. By the same token, handling will suffer somewhat as the sidewall flexes when cornering, etc. Most people don't drive their Odysseys like speed racer, particularly in winter, so I think it's a good tradeoff. The other thing to note is that winter tires, in my experience at least, tend to be a bit louder than most all-season or summer tires because of the blockier tread pattern and siping. No big deal to me, but just an FYI.
Great info. I'll do a comparison on price and keep the handling in mind to make a final decision. I suspect the extra noise will help the kids sleep better on longer rides!
 

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Reviews so far on TireRack are stearing me towards Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2, but I'm seeing two different sizes with about a $50 difference on a set of 4. The two options I'm seeing are: 225/65R17 vs 235/65R17. What would be the difference of the two? Sorry, tire noob here and google isn't giving me clear answers.
 

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the day my employer put snow tires on it I felt I could have driven up the face of a mountain without slipping. I became an instant believer.
Glad to hear you are on the winter tire train. I have personally never had them (California resident) but have plenty of experience with summer and all-season tires in the snow/cold (plenty of ski trips). Like ice skating in the wrong weather...
Any suggestions on wheels, or is that mostly an aesthetic decision?
Steel wheels, all the way! Why pay a lot for wheels that will be dirty all the time? Another option is finding a used set of wheels from another Odyssey, Pilot, Ridgeline, etc. Some on here get the 19's or 20's from a Pilot/Ridgeline and use their stock 18's for the winter tires.
The two options I'm seeing are: 225/65R17 vs 235/65R17. What would be the difference of the two?
225/235 = 'section width' in millimetres. Basically, the width of the widest part of the tire when mounted on the designed wheel width
65 = aspect ratio. The ratio of the section width to the height of the tire. (146.25mm or 152.75mm sidewall height for your options)
17 = wheel diameter. The wheel size the tire is made for.

Total tire height can be calculated:
(225+0.65mm converted to inches) x 2 + 17 = 28.5"
(235+0.65mm converted to inches) x 2 + 17 = 29.0"

Total tire height will be about 1/2" smaller with the 225's, or about 1/4" less ground clearance. Your speedo will read ~2% higher with the smaller tires.

-Charlie
 

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Is there a reason why you go down an inch in diameter?
One of the main reasons to downsize winter tires (often referred to as minus sizing) is for better traction.

The same amount of vehicle weight on a smaller footprint means more PSI on the ground leading to better traction. In addition, you are not pushing as much snow out of the way as you would be with a larger tire.

Lots more here:

 

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Generally speaking the more narrow the tire the better for winter driving.

Whatever wheel you get is completely a personal choice. They don't really make a difference with regards to performance in the winter. On our old Pacifica I had plain, black steel wheels simply because they were the cheapest option.
 

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Steelies are nice, but depending on where you live you may have a hard time finding them cheap. I just picked up a set of aftermarket alloys as winter wheels going into my 2nd winter in Alaska and was unable to find steelies cheaper than new alloys! Also beware you'll have to either get clonable TPMS sensors or deal with the car flashing the TPMS warning at you all winter. I have a 2015 EXL, but unless the Elite is different (it may be) it'll only "remember" one set of sensors and needs to be reprogrammed every time you swap. Trip to a tire shop or dealer to reset sensors makes a 2nd set of wheels less convenient.

I'm running Blizzak WS80s, but IMO the DM-V2 is a better choice being oriented towards heavier CUV/SUVs. 235/65/17 is the stock tire size for EXL.
 

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Generally speaking the more narrow the tire the better for winter driving.

Whatever wheel you get is completely a personal choice. They don't really make a difference with regards to performance in the winter. On our old Pacifica I had plain, black steel wheels simply because they were the cheapest option.
Oh come on. Every one knows that down grading to steel wheels results in a huge decrease in the performance category of Coolness Per Mile.

On an Elite, you should run with nothing less than these during the winter months.


 

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The reflection off that wheel would help melt the snow around it in the winter :D
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Generally speaking the more narrow the tire the better for winter driving.

Whatever wheel you get is completely a personal choice. They don't really make a difference with regards to performance in the winter. On our old Pacifica I had plain, black steel wheels simply because they were the cheapest option.
OK so then the 225/65R17 should have slightly better winter traction than the 235/65R17 due to it being a slightly narrower tire?
 

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Technically, yes....although it'll also technically be slightly worse on dry roads. On a road car it's 100% irrelevant. Rally cars use narrow studded tires to cut through the snow, which is where this idea comes from. Doesn't translate to a meaningful difference in the real world, but it also won't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks everyone this has been helpful. I think I'll go hunting for some Odyssey Wheels before resorting to plain steel ones (I don't quite need a space-aged rim, but prefer to maintain the original aesthetic of the van).

Based on replies I prefer the 17" wheels for the sake of extra traction in snow and lower costs (particularly if I buy 4 wheels + 4 tires). However if I get a good priced on used OEM wheels and end up in an 18" set as a result, the bit of extra cost won't be a bother.

I guess last question with that in mind, for those of you who may have driven the same car perhaps in both 17" and 18" options...can you really truly tell the difference? I can see technically and physically it's real, just curious how noticeable it will be to the driver.

Bottom line, if the 17" is significantly safer and noticeably better I'll avoid 18" new or used all together.
 
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