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Many of us here have been using Valvoline MaxLife Synthetic transmission fluid in Honda transmissions with very good results. It costs $18 + tax for a gallon from Walmart. A drain and fill uses a little less than a gallon in the Honda 6 speed. Amsoil is mentioned here occasionally, but because of their recommendation on engine oil change mileage years ago, which damaged my friend's engine (he was selling Amsoil products at the time), I don't use their products.

MaxLife is synthetic. The Honda transmission fluids (Z-1 and DW-1) are not. In simple terms, synthetic oils withstand about 20 degrees higher in-service temperature resistance than mineral base oils, and offer better viscosity stability.

If you change your own oil, a drain and fill is just about as easy as an oil change. The hard part is getting the fluid level correct. Here's how - warm the vehicle by driving a few miles. Shut off the engine, then within 60-90 seconds, read the dipstick.
Dipstick? I wish... as @CroMath already stated, what you had mentioned does not apply to the 2018+ Odys. Like yourself I've owned Honda/Acura for several decades and have only seen them get dumber.

Also, I've been using Amsoil for decades and never had an issue. It clearly outperforms other popular motor oils as there are a few here, along with myself that have actually validated this for ourselves by sending in samples. Nothing new... Very old news.

With that said, I've seen vehicles go the interval that Amsoil is good for with zero issues. Your friend may have had other issues going on there...

I usually don't go to the edge on the interval with Amsoil and treat it like regular synthetic oil, because that's just my preference.

The fact of the matter is, you could use pretty much any oil and as long as you keep it maintained with oil+filter changes and proper maintenance, you'll be fine. Of course some oils are clearly better than others, but if you're not keeping the rig until the wheels fall off, who cares? Most people either trade in or sell their cars in a few years max.. For the life longers, use the good stuff. Simple.

Mainstream oil wise, from my own testing and other validations from other fellow owners, Pennzoil Ultra Platinum is my go to. Excellent oil...
 

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Be very careful with this..... Valvoline MaxLife ATF does not list Honda ATF 2.0 approved (10 speed transmission).

It does list, "Honda ATF Z1 (Not in CVT), DW-1 and Type 3.0 and 3.1.

Valvoline MaxLife Tech Sheet
I stand corrected. I was not aware that the Honda 10 speed transmission used Honda ATF 2.0. Thank you for the correction.

I thank other contributors for taking the time to correct this error, which could have caused others to make a very serious mistake.
 

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@aww3583 : Transmission fluid for the 10spd cost me around $50 and less than an hour to do it in my driveway. I am by no means a certified mechanic or an expert, but have changed countless ATFs in my truck along with its center diff and rear differential. As I have documented the steps in my other thread, it is rather straight forward and requires limited number of tools and some common sense. The procedure is not complex by any means. Just a couple of additional steps not found in traditionally shifted transmissions.
BTW, you never flush your Honda transmissions; just a drain and fill. B123 calls for a fluid change; I presume you just loosely use the term flush rather than fluid change. Filter is not required because it is not required for the service. It is another upsale by the service department.

CPO is a great marketing scheme and aside from being able to purchase additional warranty, you are getting nothing better than a vehicle from a private sale. I have turned in my Accord about a decade ago and it was vehicle that continuous issues with the EBD that kept locking up the rear brakes and had the 2nd gear syncro issue (later covered under TSBs). The dealership I gave it to, purely because of the miles, it was listed as a CPO.


@mikidymac : warranty is not void if the process and items used are either OEM or OEM compatible. For Fluids, you need to be careful as the FSM (Factory Service Manual) would dictate what fluid to use. As far as hardware, you can choose a competitor one. For example you could use an AcDelco control arm, and not a Honda branded one. You can personally do the service, as long as the service is done properly and at the proper frequency. One needs to have proof, that can pass in a court of law, for the warranty to be intact. There are many successfully functioning vehicles on the road that rarely visit a dealership, some have never seen a service bay of a dealership.


This community has plenty of resources for us to look into and take advantage of. I would advocate for any and all able bodied folks to get accustomed to performing basic services by yourself and leave warranty related stuff to the dealerships. No one will take care of your vehicle as best as you can; so learn a couple of tricks and maintain your vehicle.

Dealerships are essentially privately owned and the service practices are not governed by the brand (in this case Honda). So whatever garbage they give you at the service center, may not 100% be applicable to the vehicle's condition, make/model. Half the time, they are not even required. So put faith in your aptitude and stop falling prey to dealerships and feel miserable after.
 

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@aww3583 : Transmission fluid for the 10spd cost me around $50 and less than an hour to do it in my driveway. I am by no means a certified mechanic or an expert, but have changed countless ATFs in my truck along with its center diff and rear differential. As I have documented the steps in my other thread, it is rather straight forward and requires limited number of tools and some common sense. The procedure is not complex by any means. Just a couple of additional steps not found in traditionally shifted transmissions.
BTW, you never flush your Honda transmissions; just a drain and fill. B123 calls for a fluid change; I presume you just loosely use the term flush rather than fluid change. Filter is not required because it is not required for the service. It is another upsale by the service department.

CPO is a great marketing scheme and aside from being able to purchase additional warranty, you are getting nothing better than a vehicle from a private sale. I have turned in my Accord about a decade ago and it was vehicle that continuous issues with the EBD that kept locking up the rear brakes and had the 2nd gear syncro issue (later covered under TSBs). The dealership I gave it to, purely because of the miles, it was listed as a CPO.


@mikidymac : warranty is not void if the process and items used are either OEM or OEM compatible. For Fluids, you need to be careful as the FSM (Factory Service Manual) would dictate what fluid to use. As far as hardware, you can choose a competitor one. For example you could use an AcDelco control arm, and not a Honda branded one. You can personally do the service, as long as the service is done properly and at the proper frequency. One needs to have proof, that can pass in a court of law, for the warranty to be intact. There are many successfully functioning vehicles on the road that rarely visit a dealership, some have never seen a service bay of a dealership.


This community has plenty of resources for us to look into and take advantage of. I would advocate for any and all able bodied folks to get accustomed to performing basic services by yourself and leave warranty related stuff to the dealerships. No one will take care of your vehicle as best as you can; so learn a couple of tricks and maintain your vehicle.

Dealerships are essentially privately owned and the service practices are not governed by the brand (in this case Honda). So whatever garbage they give you at the service center, may not 100% be applicable to the vehicle's condition, make/model. Half the time, they are not even required. So put faith in your aptitude and stop falling prey to dealerships and feel miserable after.
Not sure why that was directed at me?
I am very clear on what can and can't void the warranty. I was just pointing out that the Valvoline MaxLife previously mentioned did not list Honda 2.0 as an approved spec. This could potentially void your warranty since it is not an approved fluid for the 10 speed.

On the contrary I am a huge supporter of doing all the work yourself and not letting a dealer touch my vehicle. I do all my own services and keep all records and receipts.
 

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As far as hardware, you can choose a competitor one. For example you could use an AcDelco control arm, and not a Honda branded one.
I think using aftermarket parts could jeopardize a future warranty claim.

The following exception from the 2018 warranty could apply:
8. Vehicles which have been repaired with parts not made or supplied by Honda, and this part is responsible for the failure or malfunction​

Obviously using an aftermarket part would not void the warranty, but its use could bring a denied claim if it's connected in some way to a different failed part.
 

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I think using aftermarket parts could jeopardize a future warranty claim.

The following exception from the 2018 warranty could apply:
8. Vehicles which have been repaired with parts not made or supplied by Honda, and this part is responsible for the failure or malfunction​

Obviously using an aftermarket part would not void the warranty, but its use could bring a denied claim if it's connected in some way to a different failed part.

This has been an ongoing issue for many years. Guess who benefits by keeping the myth alive?

Don't forget the qualifier which, in effect authorizes the use of quality aftermarket repair parts, that reads, "... and this part is responsible for the failure or malfunction". This means that aftermarket parts must be demonstrated to be responsible for a failure that would not otherwise have occurred had an OEM part been used. Whether the original warranty is in effect for a future, completely unrelated failure, might be subject to question. If a dealer replaced a non-OEM failed part at owner expense, the replacement parts and labor should fall under the repair warranty.

In reality, warranty issues can depend upon a dealer's integrity and discretion. I had a warranty issue declined for peeling bumper paint on a '95 Acura. I never took the vehicle back to Acura for anything. The dealer claimed my warranty was void because I hadn't serviced the vehicle. The factory rep supported the dealer because Acura had no service records for this vehicle. I contacted the Better Business Bureau, filed a report, and Acura eventually paid up.
 

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All good information and if you have time and nothing to do give the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act a read. Chances you will know more than your dealership service manager.

Basically a manufacturer can’t require you to use their parts, fluids or services to keep your warranty. If they claim the non-OEM part caused something related to fail isn’t covered under warranty they have to prove it. So they can’t say for example you used an aftermarket oil filter and your transmission went out so your warranty is void doesn’t fly.

Secondly if the manufacturer requires a proprietary fluid that has to be used or it will void the warranty then they have to provide it free of charge. The wording on this one is tricky because almost all manufacturers dodge this by simply saying “or equivalent” and it doesn’t matter if there isn’t an equivalent available.
Personal story, we had an Infiniti AWD suv that required a special rear differential fluid that specifically said in the manual, “Use only Nissan Super Hypoid Gear Oil, any other fluid could result in damage and will not be covered under warranty”. I had never seen this wording so I went to the dealer to buy a quart as it only took a pint. The parts department said they don’t use it or stock it and they just use Mobil 1. I asked the service department what about the warranty requirements and they just said we use Mobil 1 and if it fails we will honor the warranty as long as we do the service, I said BS. Went back to the parts department and asked about ordering the correct fluid and the Parts manager overheard the conversation and went in the back and returned with a dusty old sealed quart of the special fluid and stated he didn’t remember selling one. It was $150 per quart, yes $150 per quart . So.... I called Infiniti customer service and got escalated a few times and finally caught the right person that admitted they knew about the Moss Warranty Act and was surprised I knew about the required fluid clause and begrudgingly agreed that they had to supply the special fluid in this particular case. So back to the dealer and after a bunch of calls from the manager to corporate I got one quart of $150 fluid for free.

The big picture here is you are protected by the law on aftermarket parts and doing your own work all while keeping your warranty but if you ever have to fight the dealer or manufacturer on a warranty claim the lawyers will be at your expense and you better have proof with receipts.
 

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All good information and if you have time and nothing to do give the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act a read. Chances you will know more than your dealership service manager.

Basically a manufacturer can’t require you to use their parts, fluids or services to keep your warranty. If they claim the non-OEM part caused something related to fail isn’t covered under warranty they have to prove it. So they can’t say for example you used an aftermarket oil filter and your transmission went out so your warranty is void doesn’t fly.

Secondly if the manufacturer requires a proprietary fluid that has to be used or it will void the warranty then they have to provide it free of charge. The wording on this one is tricky because almost all manufacturers dodge this by simply saying “or equivalent” and it doesn’t matter if there isn’t an equivalent available.
Personal story, we had an Infiniti AWD suv that required a special rear differential fluid that specifically said in the manual, “Use only Nissan Super Hypoid Gear Oil, any other fluid could result in damage and will not be covered under warranty”. I had never seen this wording so I went to the dealer to buy a quart as it only took a pint. The parts department said they don’t use it or stock it and they just use Mobil 1. I asked the service department what about the warranty requirements and they just said we use Mobil 1 and if it fails we will honor the warranty as long as we do the service, I said BS. Went back to the parts department and asked about ordering the correct fluid and the Parts manager overheard the conversation and went in the back and returned with a dusty old sealed quart of the special fluid and stated he didn’t remember selling one. It was $150 per quart, yes $150 per quart . So.... I called Infiniti customer service and got escalated a few times and finally caught the right person that admitted they knew about the Moss Warranty Act and was surprised I knew about the required fluid clause and begrudgingly agreed that they had to supply the special fluid in this particular case. So back to the dealer and after a bunch of calls from the manager to corporate I got one quart of $150 fluid for free.

The big picture here is you are protected by the law on aftermarket parts and doing your own work all while keeping your warranty but if you ever have to fight the dealer or manufacturer on a warranty claim the lawyers will be at your expense and you better have proof with receipts.
Many products like lubricants have an ISO certification number (International Standards for Certification). If the ISO numbers match, the product is a substitute for the original. It would be interesting if your proprietary fluid has an ISO number, you could search that number on the web for an equivalent product.

An Internet search for products like this can result in considerably lower prices.
 

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Many products like lubricants have an ISO certification number (International Standards for Certification). If the ISO numbers match, the product is a substitute for the original. It would be interesting if your proprietary fluid has an ISO number, you could search that number on the web for an equivalent product.

An Internet search for products like this can result in considerably lower prices.
Yes, tried all that and even called Mobil, Valvoline Amsoil and others and none could confirm that they met the spec. The Infiniti was parked and totaled by a reckless driver so not worried about it anymore. But I still have a pint in the shed.
 
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