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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Install Date: The oil catch can was installed on 08/11/2019.

Note
: Anytime someone modifies their engine with non OEM accessory, they assume the risk of voiding their vehicle's mfgr's warranty and possibly damaging the vehicle if proper care is not taken. By following these suggestions, you are at your own risk as I do not assume responsibility of your install.

Definition: An oil catch tank (oil catch can) is a device that is fitted into the cam/crank case ventilation system (PCV) on a car. Installing an oil catch tank (can) aims to reduce the amount of oil vapors re-circulated into the intake of the engine.

Engine: With the introduction of the G5 Odyssey, the van was also equipped with the J35Y6. This is a Direct Fuel Injection (DI) engine, part of the Earth Dreams line, that is shared among the '15+ Acura TLX, '16+ Pilot, '17+ Ridgeline, and '19+ Passport. With the switch to DI , unlike the Port Fuel Injection, fuel is not available to 'clean' off deposits on the back of the intake valves. Many engines were rumored to have 'gunked up' intake valves due to this.

TOOLS NEEDED
  • Appropriate size drill bits (multiple)
  • Electric drill
  • Appropriate size sheet metal screw
  • Primer/rust inhibitor
  • Appropriate size screw bits
  • Box cutter or a hose cutter
  • Pliers
ITEMS NEEDED
  • Any brand two port oil catch can with 3/8" inlet and outlet port.
  • OEM hose clamps (from OEM hoses) or Spring type hose clamps or Fuel line screw type hose clamps (worm gear type is last resort)
  • 5-Feet of 3/8" rubber braided hose (Fuel line or PCV)
  • Capful of WD40
NOTE: Oil catch cans range from $15 to $400 and by principle they attempt to do the same thing. For a daily driver with an unmodified engine, lower price oil catch cans would suffice.


REMOVAL
  • Lift and remove the plastic Engine cover
  • Remove the PCV hose from the intake manifold and secure the hose clamps for later use. (leave the end connected to the valve cover.
INSTALLATION
  • Familiarize the purchased catch can and install the ports according to the instructions supplied
  • Locate a serviceable location for catch can that is not intrusive or obstructs engine movement.
  • Drill pilot holes in the selected location and follow it up with appropriate size drill bit
  • Use anti-rust or primer on the drilled holes
  • Mock up the required length of hoses based on the catch can location and cut to length
  • Apply a thin coat of WD40 on the catch can ports and the inside of their respective rubber braided hoses to slip them on easily.
  • Install the 3/8" hose to the PCV port on the intake manifold and secure it with the hose clamp.
  • Route the hose diagonally across the top of the manifold, securing it to the guide at the bottom left (similar to OEM setup)
  • Connect the other end of the 3/8" hose (from the manifold) to the port marked 'OUT' on the catch can and secure it using a hose clamp
  • Connect the OEM PCV hose (from the valve cover) to the port marked 'IN' on the catch can.
  • Secure the catch can in a serviceable location ensuring the hoses are not interfering any moving parts or will pinch. Secure the hose with zip ties if needed
  • Replace the engine cover. You are done.
<<< Click To Enlarge >>>

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Discussion Starter #2
UPDATE: 10/13/2019

Since the above install of the catch can I have driven approximately 4350 miles in 2 months as I average around 27,000 miles a year. The vehicle had approximately 23600 miles on the ODO at the time of install.
I emptied the catch can yesterday afternoon and the residue inside was around 3 tablespoons (1.5 fl-oz). I cannot attest to it being normal or abnormal.


<< Click to enlarge >>

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Well, over the course of a 10,000-mile oil change interval (OCI) on our Gen 2 Odysseys, each of them will have consumed 20-ounces of oil. This is a combination of blow-by thorugh the PCV and oil that is combusted in the cylinders. That 1.5 ounces you caught in almost 5,000 miles of driving certainly sounds reasonable. As well, this is oil that did not enter the plenum, which is a good thing! :cool:

Thank you for doing this, documenting it, and reporting back. It's not ornamental...your catch can actually does the intended job, namely catch oil vapor running through the PCV system and keep it out of the intake tract.

OF
 
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Smufguy,

Could you share which catch can you installed? Also reasons why you chose that one would be helpful since I'm looking for one for our 2019 Ody EX.

BTW, is there enough room to unscrew the can without removing it via the mounting bracket?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
The oil catch can I used was a PQY Compact Baffled 2-port catch can (https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07HBYZ5B6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1).
I advocate this type as it has a 3/8" port for 3/8" hose, which is the same size that OEM PCV hose. Moreover, the baffled can also has a 50 Micron screen to filter in only vapors and not those laiden with heavy particles. This design used to be on cans that cost $100+ just few years ago, but thanks to China, now we get them for $15 on Amazon. This design (the one I provided a link to) is the same design that Mishimoto uses on their compact catch cans (MMBCC-CBTWO) and cost $120.

<< Click on image to enlarge >>
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You can also get a can that has a petcock on the bottom for easy draining >> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07KK81KMG/ref=twister_B07HHC8SMM?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1. However, due to inadequate room in the engine bay, I opted to go with the basic can and drain it on every oil change. Ensure to lightly lube the rubber gasket on the catch can every time you perform an inspection and screw it back on. If the filter gets real dirty, remove it from the can and use something like a carburetor or fuel injector spray cleaner, to 'blow out' the muck from inside out.


CAUTION: stay away from catch cans that DO NOT have a filter and show a 'baffle' on the ceiling of the housing that has the ports (like below). These, that do not have a filter, allow most of the vapors back into the intake tract. Been there, done that, so take my advice.


<< Click on image to enlarge >>
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The oil catch can I used was a PQY Compact Baffled 2-port catch can (https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07HBYZ5B6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1).
I advocate this type as it has a 3/8" port for 3/8" hose, which is the same size that OEM PCV hose. Moreover, the baffled can also has a 50 Micron screen to filter in only vapors and not those laiden with heavy particles. This design used to be on cans that cost $100+ just few years ago, but thanks to China, now we get them for $15 on Amazon. This design (the one I provided a link to) is the same design that Mishimoto uses on their compact catch cans (MMBCC-CBTWO) and cost $120.

<< Click on image to enlarge >>
View attachment 152866

You can also get a can that has a petcock on the bottom for easy draining >> https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07KK81KMG/ref=twister_B07HHC8SMM?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1. However, due to inadequate room in the engine bay, I opted to go with the basic can and drain it on every oil change. Ensure to lightly lube the rubber gasket on the catch can every time you perform an inspection and screw it back on. If the filter gets real dirty, remove it from the can and use something like a carburetor or fuel injector spray cleaner, to 'blow out' the muck from inside out.


CAUTION: stay away from catch cans that DO NOT have a filter and show a 'baffle' on the ceiling of the housing that has the ports (like below). These, that do not have a filter, allow most of the vapors back into the intake tract. Been there, done that, so take my advice.


<< Click on image to enlarge >>
View attachment 152867 View attachment 152868
Hi Smufguy,

Thanks for all of your valuable information. Especially the picture of where the catch can is spliced into the pvc line. Looking at our 2019 Ody EX, I thought the line that goes diagonally to the center of the intake manifold might be the one but your picture confirmed it.

And thanks for the heads up to stay away from the cans that just have a baffle on the ceiling of the housing. I was thinking of getting the one that has a dip stick but it just has the baffle on the ceiling so I guess that's the type you advise staying away from.

I have additional questions:

1. I see that the catch can you selected is a copy of the big "M" catch can. It looks like it has plastic fittings that the hoses connect to. Are those plastic fittings durable?

2. Did you just remove the end of the existing hose that connects to the center of the intake manifold and connect it to the catch can input?

3. Is the internal brass filter screwed on which allows removal for cleaning?

4. Do you have to unmount your catch can to unscrew the can to empty it?

5. Is your dealer OK with the installation of the catch can? No voiding of warranty issues?

Thanks for your time,
Raptor88
 

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Discussion Starter #7
@Raptor88 , below are my responses

1. I see that the catch can you selected is a copy of the big "M" catch can. It looks like it has plastic fittings that the hoses connect to. Are those plastic fittings durable?
- the description is incorrect for the barbs on Amazon. The ports/barbs are actually machined cast aluminum. Though they are light weight, they do their job. What I recommend is using Teflon tape on the threads when installing the ports into the can.

2. Did you just remove the end of the existing hose that connects to the center of the intake manifold and connect it to the catch can input?
- Correct. The hose end that goes into the intake manifold went into the 'IN' port on the can. The valve cover end remained untouched.

3. Is the internal brass filter screwed on which allows removal for cleaning?
- Yup. It is screwed on and you use an adjustable wrench to unscrew and screw it back on. No teflon is needed on the threads and just finger tighten it and a very gentle snug on the brass filter.

4. Do you have to unmount your catch can to unscrew the can to empty it?
- Yup. I snip the two zip ties, empty the can and install it using the zipties. You can get the ones with the valve (petcock) on the bottom, but I was not able to find a decent location in the engine bay to mount the can and still have the ability to drain from the bottom.

5. Is your dealer OK with the installation of the catch can? No voiding of warranty issues?
- I do not take any of my vehicles to the dealer and all service is performed by me or my trusted shop. All existing TSBs and Recalls were done prior to the can install. Should I need to go the dealership, I would just remove the can prior. It should take you about 5 mins from opening the hood, removing the can, and closing the hood. Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act protects customers against any aftermarket add on, that has not been the 'cause' of a warranted repair. Meaning, automakers cannot void your warranty, just because you installed an equipment that was not factory approved. However, many including myself, do not want to part take in that educational exercise. If I was you, I would remove it and then take it to the dealer.
 

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@Raptor88 , below are my responses

1. I see that the catch can you selected is a copy of the big "M" catch can. It looks like it has plastic fittings that the hoses connect to. Are those plastic fittings durable?
- the description is incorrect for the barbs on Amazon. The ports/barbs are actually machined cast aluminum. Though they are light weight, they do their job. What I recommend is using Teflon tape on the threads when installing the ports into the can.

2. Did you just remove the end of the existing hose that connects to the center of the intake manifold and connect it to the catch can input?
- Correct. The hose end that goes into the intake manifold went into the 'IN' port on the can. The valve cover end remained untouched.

3. Is the internal brass filter screwed on which allows removal for cleaning?
- Yup. It is screwed on and you use an adjustable wrench to unscrew and screw it back on. No teflon is needed on the threads and just finger tighten it and a very gentle snug on the brass filter.

4. Do you have to unmount your catch can to unscrew the can to empty it?
- Yup. I snip the two zip ties, empty the can and install it using the zipties. You can get the ones with the valve (petcock) on the bottom, but I was not able to find a decent location in the engine bay to mount the can and still have the ability to drain from the bottom.

5. Is your dealer OK with the installation of the catch can? No voiding of warranty issues?
- I do not take any of my vehicles to the dealer and all service is performed by me or my trusted shop. All existing TSBs and Recalls were done prior to the can install. Should I need to go the dealership, I would just remove the can prior. It should take you about 5 mins from opening the hood, removing the can, and closing the hood. Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act protects customers against any aftermarket add on, that has not been the 'cause' of a warranted repair. Meaning, automakers cannot void your warranty, just because you installed an equipment that was not factory approved. However, many including myself, do not want to part take in that educational exercise. If I was you, I would remove it and then take it to the dealer.
Smufguy,
Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge. Very, very helpful.
All the best,
Raptor88
 

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Some of that is actually moisture blowby from the combustion process (it takes very, very little moisture to give it that "chocolate milk" look). That's normal, and this is a great follow-up, smufguy. I like that this stuff is removed via your catch can setup, rather than re-introduced into the engine induction system.

Given that the wife and I are now thinking of selling our 2002 & 2003 Odysseys and going for something newer, I'm now primed up to give this a try, too. I'm going to try and follow the same mantra you mentioned in your informative "Q&A" gig on Post #7 of this thread.

Thanks for the good pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You are welcome. I am still baffled how on my G5 Odyssey, I get this and on my G1 Ridgeline (2010), I get very little. Granted that my Ridgeline is not fitted with a DI J35, I am still confused.
Either way, the injector spray in these motors seem to 'wash' the back of the valves, but I still wonder how the piston domes and the face of the valves would look with this much blow-by. Maybe one can look inside the engine at around 100K, or when the spark plugs are due to see how the valvetrain and the combustion chamber looks like.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@Raptor88 , below are my responses

2. Did you just remove the end of the existing hose that connects to the center of the intake manifold and connect it to the catch can input?
- Correct. The hose end that goes into the intake manifold went into the 'IN' port on the can. The valve cover end remained untouched.
It just dawned on me that I misspoke here. The hose that comes from the center of the intake manifold actually goes into the OUT port of the can. The hose from the valve cover goes into the IN port of the can.
My apologies.

My instructions in post #1 is accurate.
 

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I think a properly designed catch can is a good item to install on any vehicle. However, it does require occasional maintenance in the way of draining the captured oil and condensate. Since most manufacturers tout how little maintenance is required on any given vehicle, adding one more item to check (catch can), versus simply letting the engine devour the oil vapor and condensate is an "easy way out".

I'd want any vehicle I might purchase to be equipped with a PVC catch can, big ATF cooler with thermostats, power steering cooler, ATF fluid temperature readouts, and so on. That would put me into probably less than 1/1,000th of 1 percent of the buying public who actually cares about these things, which means manufacturers will never install them .... no benefit for the cost.

OF
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If this thing is necessary then why doesnt honda install it?
They did on certain model year Civics and it was integrated into the upper portion of the valve cover. as OF mentioned, it has to do with integration and maintenance. When engine packaging is highly sought after these days, adding a separate system to perform just one thing, is costly as required retooling, production, and stocking costs $$$. In retrospect, the lack of a PCV catch can also works in the favor of the headlership service centers as it is complicated and expensive to change fuel injectors and address clogged valves. Similar to how the 9-spd and 10-spd Honda transmissions are a PITA to change fluids on and require a visit to the dealership and costs about $200+ to get the ATF changed out. Insane!
Also, the J-series is an engine mated to a large platform vehicle primarily geared towards the Western hemisphere and is not considered as a 'global' architecture. Thus any R&D into these engines, is very limited.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
UPDATE: 06-2-2020 ODO: 42,306mi

Changed the oil today and took out around 5.25qts of used oil. Had about the same 1.7fl-oz of blowby. This time around, the residue was much darker and thicker than before.
In my original post, I did not add images of how it looked with the engine cover in place, so I attached one.

G5v-062020.jpg G5a-062020.jpg g5b-062020.jpg

I recommend that once the catch can is open, clean the screen and ensure it is tight/secure, along with the baffling and its support rod. Mine baffling ring and supporting rod was a tad loose.
 

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Does you catch can have a heater in it? They were quite popular with VW TDI owners as blowby was a serious problem in those engines. They could freeze up in the winter time and blow things apart. I never had it happen to me, but I did check it periodically during the winter time.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Does you catch can have a heater in it? They were quite popular with VW TDI owners as blowby was a serious problem in those engines. They could freeze up in the winter time and blow things apart. I never had it happen to me, but I did check it periodically during the winter time.
I have heard that on the Ridgeline Forum as well; the freezing thing. I have not and I use the braided oil line hoses, which are usually what you find from the factory in your vehicle. The freezing in the winter was related to the older style PCV cans that had the exterior ball valve. I believe those were pre OBD-1 engines.

I live in central NJ and have had no issues or concerns with freezing. I have the same setup in my 2010 Ridgeline as well. Same can and same hoses.
 
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