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10k is pretty taboo to me, are they really expecting 10k oil changes to be sufficient in newer Odys?
Quite a few manufacturers are going to the 7500-10k timeline for oil changes nowadays. Not a good thing, imo.
 

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I also own a 2018 CRV, with the 1.5L turbo. The maintenance minder is at 30%, with almost 10k miles since the last oil change. It should be close to 15k when the oil is changed.
 

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Keep in mind the new engines burn much cleaner and the oils are synthetic to account for the longer service intervals. Mobil 1 and a lot of the other major synthetics have been doing extended oci and offering their own warranty because of this for years. If it makes you feel better change it when you feel it should be done but don’t think these longer intervals are going to hurt your engine.

Also never use any kind on wrench to tighten your new oil filter, there’s a reason it’s only supposed to be hand tight.
 

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I also own a 2018 CRV, with the 1.5L turbo. The maintenance minder is at 30%, with almost 10k miles since the last oil change. It should be close to 15k when the oil is changed.
This is why I’m leery of buying used. That poor CRV.
 

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Keep in mind the new engines burn much cleaner and the oils are synthetic to account for the longer service intervals. Mobil 1 and a lot of the other major synthetics have been doing extended oci and offering their own warranty because of this for years. If it makes you feel better change it when you feel it should be done but don’t think these longer intervals are going to hurt your engine.

Also never use any kind on wrench to tighten your new oil filter, there’s a reason it’s only supposed to be hand tight.
Longer OCIs are absolutely to blame for increased varnish and sludge in vehicles. And if you have a vehicle that’s a known oil diluter like the earlier Honda 1.5l turbos, recipe for disaster.
 

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Also never use any kind on wrench to tighten your new oil filter, there’s a reason it’s only supposed to be hand tight.
That's exactly what I was taught. You spin the oil filter on and tighten it as best as you can by hand. I always wet the gasket with a bit of the new oil. When the engine heats up, the seal will be completed. Same goes for the oil pan plug. "Snug it" with a socket wrench but don't over tighten. The threads are very fine and can strip. The fine threads are also less susceptible to loosening off.
 

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I just did my 43rd oil change on my Odyssey (263k). I found when it was new (2012) that my Goldwing filter wrench fit the OEM Honda filter perfect.

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Longer OCIs are absolutely to blame for increased varnish and sludge in vehicles. And if you have a vehicle that’s a known oil diluter like the earlier Honda 1.5l turbos, recipe for disaster.
When is the last time you herd of a modern engine dying form varnish or sludge?
Heck, when is the last time you heard of a modern engine dying from and oil related issue?
Oil dilution is a different issue than saying your engine will be ruined with the manufacturer suggested OCI.

For an actual case study, we have 10 2004-2006 Chevy 1500 HD pickups with about 250,000-350,000 miles that are in the dirt and dust every day 6 days a week. Because of crew schedules their OCI average about 7,000-8,000 with Carquest house brand Synthetic 5w-30, Carquest Blue oil filters and air filters at every oil change. The trucks are falling apart but they don't burn oil and looking into the oil fill plug no varnish or sludge. Pretty sure your Odyssey run on the highway will be fine at the Honda recommended OCI.

Easy and cheap way to determine the correct OCI for your vehicle and driving habits is send a sample to a lab like Blackstone for analysis.
 

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When is the last time you herd of a modern engine dying form varnish or sludge?
Heck, when is the last time you heard of a modern engine dying from and oil related issue?
Oil dilution is a different issue than saying your engine will be ruined with the manufacturer suggested OCI.

For an actual case study, we have 10 2004-2006 Chevy 1500 HD pickups with about 250,000-350,000 miles that are in the dirt and dust every day 6 days a week. Because of crew schedules their OCI average about 7,000-8,000 with Carquest house brand Synthetic 5w-30, Carquest Blue oil filters and air filters at every oil change. The trucks are falling apart but they don't burn oil and looking into the oil fill plug no varnish or sludge. Pretty sure your Odyssey run on the highway will be fine at the Honda recommended OCI.

Easy and cheap way to determine the correct OCI for your vehicle and driving habits is send a sample to a lab like Blackstone for analysis.
If I wasn't banned on BITOG right now, I'd post you a link to a newer Ford PSD that sludged all to heck because of lengthened OCI that was just posted a week or so ago. There's also threads from people with known sludge engines like Toyota's 4 cylinder engines in the Camry's from the mid-late 2000s and early 2010s. So yes, it does and will happen when people extend out their OCI or use lower quality oils.

Also, your own example, you said 7-8k miles and I'm assuming an API SN/SN+/SP and GF5/GF6 oil. That is about the high end of the spectrum for low values of TBNs, even for high quality oils. One example of Shell Rotella Gas Truck from BITOG UOAs shows TBN values in the 1.0-2.0 range after 5-6k miles. The Chevy 6.0s are not known to be hard on oils like other engines, especially nowadays with DOHCs, SOHCs, VVT, iVtec, AFM/DFM/VCM, etc.

And I absolutely agree about sending UOAs in for analysis. As long as viscosity hasn't sheared, there's no oil dilution, and the TBN is a decent level, some engines/oils can go up to 10k on oils. It's also going to depend on conditions of driving, stop and go, cold/hot weather, etc. so there is no tried and true answer that applies to EVERYONE. Every person's drive, commute, and usage is different.
 

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If I wasn't banned on BITOG right now, I'd post you a link to a newer Ford PSD that sludged all to heck because of lengthened OCI that was just posted a week or so ago. There's also threads from people with known sludge engines like Toyota's 4 cylinder engines in the Camry's from the mid-late 2000s and early 2010s. So yes, it does and will happen when people extend out their OCI or use lower quality oils.

Also, your own example, you said 7-8k miles and I'm assuming an API SN/SN+/SP and GF5/GF6 oil. That is about the high end of the spectrum for low values of TBNs, even for high quality oils. One example of Shell Rotella Gas Truck from BITOG UOAs shows TBN values in the 1.0-2.0 range after 5-6k miles. The Chevy 6.0s are not known to be hard on oils like other engines, especially nowadays with DOHCs, SOHCs, VVT, iVtec, AFM/DFM/VCM, etc.

And I absolutely agree about sending UOAs in for analysis. As long as viscosity hasn't sheared, there's no oil dilution, and the TBN is a decent level, some engines/oils can go up to 10k on oils. It's also going to depend on conditions of driving, stop and go, cold/hot weather, etc. so there is no tried and true answer that applies to EVERYONE. Every person's drive, commute, and usage is different.
While I am not saying it can't happen, I have you covered on the 6.7 Ford Powerstroke as we have those also in our fleet that run to the top of the OCI with no oil related issues and only tow goosenecks all day everyday. I would argue the sludge is due to some other factor than just running at what the manufacturer recommends. If it matters we run Dello 400 10w-30.

Remember, we are talking about manufacturer recommended intervals on the Odyssey, not every single engine made and not seeing how far you can possibly go before changing your oil.
 

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While I am not saying it can't happen, I have you covered on the 6.7 Ford Powerstroke as we have those also in our fleet that run to the top of the OCI with no oil related issues and only tow goosenecks all day everyday. I would argue the sludge is due to some other factor than just running at what the manufacturer recommends. If it matters we run Dello 400 10w-30.

Remember, we are talking about manufacturer recommended intervals on the Odyssey, not every single engine made and not seeing how far you can possibly go before changing your oil.
Id hope you’re not saying it can’t happen because it did happen lol

The issue was lack of maintenance and extended OCIs with excessive idling. So yes, engines can and do sludge up with relaxed maintenance.
 

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lack of maintenance and extended OCIs with excessive idling
Extended idling is very tough on the oil. (condensation, acids, combustion byproducts, unburned fuel, lower temperature, etc.)

Like GPS which can direct a driver to take an abandoned logging road, service schedules and reminders can defer needed maintenance in exceptional circumstances.

Humans have to be always vigilant, and ready to overrule machines when necessary.
 
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Extended idling is very tough on the oil. (condensation, acids, combustion byproducts, unburned fuel, lower temperature, etc.)

Like GPS which can direct a driver to take an abandoned logging road, service schedules and reminders can defer needed maintenance in exceptional circumstances.

Humans have to be always vigilant, and ready to overrule machines when necessary.
Absolutely agreed, which is why saying, "go the manf. recommended interval" or "you can go 10k on oil!" is such a giant misnomer and why I take such issue with people telling others "you can go 10k, it's fine!" And that's why most manufacturers have Extreme or Severe conditions regarding oil for situations where 10k is too much such as extended idling, towing, start/stop traffic in city, etc.

:)
 

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I thought this was interesting given that a lot of new cars don't even list an OCI let alone a Severe OCI like the Odyssey...

This is from Amsoil.
Not long ago, most people changed oil every 3,000 miles (4,800 km). No matter what. Well, except AMSOIL users who took advantage of the 25,000-mile (40,200-km)/1-year drain interval of our top-tier synthetic oil. Then oil life monitors (OLM) came along and changed the game.
While first-generation oil life monitors were simple, mileage-based systems that prescribed fixed oil-change intervals regardless of operating conditions, today’s systems are far more sophisticated. They monitor several conditions known to reduce oil life, enter those values into an algorithm and return the oil-life percentage you see on your vehicle’s display.
Today, it’s common for an OLM in a vehicle driven mostly under normal service to recommend an oil change after 10,000 miles (16,000 km) or more. They’ve prevented the waste of countless quarts of perfectly good oil over the years.
What does an oil life monitor track?
Honestly, oil-life monitor is a poor description for these systems. A better name is oil life estimator. They do not monitor any direct physical or chemical property of oil; they only accumulate data from the vehicle’s computer and predict how your driving habits and operating conditions have affected the oil’s viscosity, total base number (a measure of remaining detergency), oxidation level and other factors. Since the OLM can’t measure these key properties like a chemist in a lab would measure them, how can it know when the oil has, for example, only 10 percent life remaining? It can’t – it simply estimates oil life based on an algorithm
Driving conditions affect oil life percentage
Oil life monitors track climate, driving habits and other conditions. The algorithm calculates mileage, idle time, engine temperatures, trip times, engine loads, and ignition starts and stops. It then establishes an oil change interval as low as 3,000 miles (4,800 km) and all the way up to 10,000 miles (16,000 km) and more depending on severity of conditions.
Typically, an OLM establishes oil-change intervals in the 5,000-7,000 mile (8,000-11,000 km) range.
Here is a real-world example: Say you start your car 20 minutes before you leave the house because it’s -30˚F (-34ºC) outside and you like to get in a warm car.
Then you drive about 15 minutes to work. These conditions will lead to a shorter oil change interval since increased idle time, cold temperatures and frequent short trips shorten oil life more than “normal” operating conditions. Oil life monitors are advanced compared to the universal 3,000-mile oil change from years ago. However, there are some gaps in the technology.
Here are a few things oil life monitors don’t track
  • Oil Level – Oil life monitors don’t keep track of the amount of oil in your engine. However, if you completely run out of oil, hopefully your oil pressure light will illuminate before your engine fails. It’s good practice to check oil at least every month to help avoid such a scenario.
  • Oil Quality – Oil life monitors have no ability to measure oil quality. They can’t distinguish between, for example, AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil and vegetable oil (do not try that at home). That’s why your oil life monitor may trigger even though the oil in your engine still has thousands of miles to go before requiring a change. In such cases, you can safely use the oil for the full drain interval recommended on the label.
  • Oil Condition– Like I said, as sophisticated as your OLM is, it can’t tell you, for example, that there are 1,000 ppm of wear metal in your oil. Only oil analysis can do that. If you have not tried it, I highly recommend it. Oil analysis can give insight into many different aspects of your vehicle.
  • Despite their shortcomings, oil life monitors offer a better alternative to wasting perfectly good motor oil.Your OLM also acts as a safeguard against driving too long without an oil change in severe service. Many motorists may not realize they subject their vehicles to extended idle times or frequent short trips, which can expose the engine to wear if you don’t keep on top of oil changes.
No, I wouldn't go 25,000 miles even using Amsoil.

One point this article points out that I am sure is overlooked with these monitors is that you still should be checking your oil level.
 

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This wrench
I just did my 43rd oil change on my Odyssey (263k). I found when it was new (2012) that my Goldwing filter wrench fit the OEM Honda filter perfect.

View attachment 164406
This wrench is your best bet. Its the only wrench that can grip the filter without destroying it. Honda should make a filter like this its definately needed for these new poorly placed filters.

 

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Absolutely agreed, which is why saying, "go the manf. recommended interval" or "you can go 10k on oil!" is such a giant misnomer and why I take such issue with people telling others "you can go 10k, it's fine!" And that's why most manufacturers have Extreme or Severe conditions regarding oil for situations where 10k is too much such as extended idling, towing, start/stop traffic in city, etc.

The maintenance minder will take all of this into account and adjust the oil change interval as needed.
 

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The maintenance minder will take all of this into account and adjust the oil change interval as needed.
But wait, people just said 10k was more than fine and not an issue. How can this be?!?

;)
 

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But wait, people just said 10k was more than fine and not an issue. How can this be?!?
Correct, this is fine for my CRV, which hops on the freeway and commutes 40 miles at 75 mph.

Someone who does towing, lots of hills or short trips will see shorter intervals from the maintenance minder.
 

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Correct, this is fine for my CRV, which hops on the freeway and commutes 40 miles at 75 mph.

Someone who does towing, lots of hills or short trips will see shorter intervals from the maintenance minder.
I dun beliv it. People on here said you go 10k no problems on oil!!11!
 
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