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Hello All

For The 2011 Honda Odyssey EX-L,...The Owners Manual Calls For 4.5 Qts. For Oil Change With Filter,...Is It Ok If I Put The Full 5 Qt In The Engine???
 

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2015 Odyssey EX
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There’s no benefit to overfilling the crankcase, especially by a full half quart. Just go by whatever the dipstick says is correct. The number in the manual isn’t the final word on the proper oil level anyway - the dipstick is.
 

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+1 for going by the dipstick. If it were only 1/2 a quart it's unlikely to cause an issue, but why not just do it right and save the 1/2 quart for the next change. I end up with "free" oil every 9th change.
 

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+1 for going by the dipstick. If it were only 1/2 a quart it's unlikely to cause an issue, but why not just do it right and save the 1/2 quart for the next change. I end up with "free" oil every 9th change.
Same Here !!!!! ;)
 

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+1 for going by the dipstick. If it were only 1/2 a quart it's unlikely to cause an issue, but why not just do it right and save the 1/2 quart for the next change. I end up with "free" oil every 9th change.
^this
Just keep the 5 qt jug with the extra half qts until it gets to 4.5 and then use that for the next oil change. It's fine to mix oil brands/types as long as they are 0w20 or 5w20. I have been doing this for 5+ years in the Ody.
 

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I always put the full 5 qt jug in, just for convenience. Have never needed to add oil between changes. Nothing has blown up yet.
 

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Going by the dipstick exclusively is a mistake. Its possible for the dipstick to be slightly inaccurate because of how its mounted as well as the actual manufacturing tolerances on the stick. The
oil pan and engine dimensions are absolutely consistent and accurate in comparison. IOW, all of them within a class are just alike.
So, the most correct procedure is to replace the oil with the specified amount, run the engine to operating temperature, allow it to drain back for at least two minutes on a level surface, then pull the stick, wipe it, pull it again and note where the oil line falls on the stick - this is the correct oil level.
For example, my Ford truck takes six qts. With the correct amount of oil, the level falls exactly between the 'Min' and 'Max' lines on the stick. If someone who didn't know any better went only by the stick, they would probably overfill it - they all do the same thing with air for tires (if enough is good, too much is better).
Even KIA is wiser than Honda for the USA customers - my Sportage takes 4.73L (5 qts). I take my 5 qt. jug of Pennzoil syn in and they pour it in. Done. I usually pull the stick and look underneath for any major leak before driving it away.
Having to measure instead of just dumping is a PITA but the process of adding, checking the stick, adding, etc. is too inaccurate. All you need is a 1 qt. measuring cup but it must be perfectly clean.
 

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I always put the full 5 qt jug in, just for convenience. Have never needed to add oil between changes. Nothing has blown up yet.
agreed, this engine is fairly forgiving for minor overfills, provided its not 2-3 quarts!
some models with timing chains and splash lubrication not so much.
I have been told it can cause the oil to froth up in the crankcase.
Never saw that personally...
 

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I always put the full 5 qt jug in, just for convenience. Have never needed to add oil between changes. Nothing has blown up yet.
Same here (well, only for the two oil changes I have had it for...). With a VCM muzzler, no oil burning between changes (every 5k miles) and the level always stays just above the max line.

Engines vary in their ability to handle (slight) overfilling. Heck, some engines must be slightly overfilled if you are going to be driving in a 'spirited' manner to keep oil covering the oil pickup. If a half quart overfilled will cause a problem, Honda messed up their engine design...

-Charlie
 

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I guess you could overfill the crankcase a bit, but why not save the 1/2 qt for later use.

Best method I know to check oil level is to pull the dipstick out immediately after parking and turning the engine off. Then wipe the dipstick clean and set it aside (don't re-insert) and wait for at least 10-15 minutes for the oil to settle and drain from the dipstick tube. After so long, then insert the dipstick and remove to check the oil level. By doing this, there is no oil smear remaining in the dipstick tube and the stick shows an accurate oil level with no smear interference.
 

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If the oil level is unclear due to oil smear, you can 'grab' the dipstick with a paper/shop towel and see the highest point at which the towel is fully 'wet' with oil. Like this:



-Charlie
 

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I always put the full 5 qt jug in, just for convenience. Have never needed to add oil between changes. Nothing has blown up yet.
Same here (well, only for the two oil changes I have had it for...). With a VCM muzzler, no oil burning between changes (every 5k miles) and the level always stays just above the max line.
I have always used 4.5 qts and oil level remained right at the full mark until about 3500 miles. After that, the oil level appears to go above the full mark (fuel dilution???). Have either of you noticed this when you use the full 5qt jug?
 

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Not me. To maybe explain the increase in volume you're seeing - sometimes engine oil will absorb water and volatile liquids (e.g., gasoline) from the blow-by gases, especially when the car is used in a way that does not allow it to really get up to high temperature and stay there for a while. What happens in those cases sometimes, is that they will then go on a long drive, burn off the ~1/2 - to - 1 quart (for engines with 11 quarts) of volatile components, find their oil level has dropped dramatically and wonder if something went wrong.
 

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Not me. To maybe explain the increase in volume you're seeing - sometimes engine oil will absorb water and volatile liquids (e.g., gasoline) from the blow-by gases, especially when the car is used in a way that does not allow it to really get up to high temperature and stay there for a while. What happens in those cases sometimes, is that they will then go on a long drive, burn off the ~1/2 - to - 1 quart (for engines with 11 quarts) of volatile components, find their oil level has dropped dramatically and wonder if something went wrong.
Thx for the suggestions. It is certainly possible that short trips are contributing to this issue. We use this van for short trips most days, but it also gets at least one 10+ mile trip most days. I would assume that would be enough to burn off any water, but TBH I haven't paid that much attention to how the van was driven when the oil level increased the most (about 1/4 inch over the hashed area on the dipstick). I have an oil change coming up soon, so next round I will pay more attention to my wife's driving habits (got lots of time for these things now that I will be working from home for the next x months!)
 

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I'm thinking more like 100+ mile trips to burn it off, based on reports I have read. Fully hot, long duration. I would not worry about it, but it may be an explanation for what you are seeing.
 

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We use this van for short trips most days, but it also gets at least one 10+ mile trip most days.
10 miles still doesn't fully warm up a vehicle... The coolant gets up to temp fast, but the oil takes longer than that.

I have notices a bit of fuel smell in the oil, but not enough to be concerned about. Or van is mostly used for ~3 mile drives with 45+ mile drives every other week or so and rare (every 3-6 months?) road trips.

-Charlie
 

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Great suggestions! I will make an effort to take longer trips for the next OCI to see if that helps.

@brybo86 that is an excellent idea. However I would probably be divorced shortly after and wouldn't own the Ody any more... :)
 

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TL;DR - Whether or not you check your oil at all is orders of magnitude more important than precisely how you check it.

Going by the dipstick exclusively is a mistake. Its possible for the dipstick to be slightly inaccurate because of how its mounted as well as the actual manufacturing tolerances on the stick. The
oil pan and engine dimensions are absolutely consistent and accurate in comparison. IOW, all of them within a class are just alike.
I find this claim to be extraordinary. I have not conducted a statistical analysis of actual parts in the field, but I would bet the dipstick is at least as precise as the oil capacity specification. Most oil specs I've seen are in quarts/liters to one (1) decimal place, which gives a tolerance of about 3 ounces.
So, the most correct procedure is to replace the oil with the specified amount, run the engine to operating temperature, allow it to drain back for at least two minutes on a level surface, then pull the stick, wipe it, pull it again and note where the oil line falls on the stick - this is the correct oil level.
Maybe. This depends on how thoroughly it was drained, and also on the manufacturer's procedure for checking. Some like it hot. Some like it cold. Drainback time may vary. Subaru is clever enough to give both "cold full" and "hot full" on the dipstick.
For example, my Ford truck takes six qts. With the correct amount of oil, the level falls exactly between the 'Min' and 'Max' lines on the stick. If someone who didn't know any better went only by the stick, they would probably overfill it - they all do the same thing with air for tires (if enough is good, too much is better).
Six - is that 6, 6.0, or 6.000? How precisely do you drain your oil bottles? Do you also have a calibration certificate for your tire gauge?
All you need is a 1 qt. measuring cup but it must be perfectly clean.
All you really need is the clear strip on the side of the quart bottle. These are usually marked in 2-oz increments, which is within the tolerance of the one-decimal-point capacity specification as outlined above.

Look, I'm not trying to be a jerk. I'm just trying to say, well, basically what I said in the very first line: Check your oil. Somehow. The rest is in the weeds. Do what helps you sleep at night.
 

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TL;DR - Whether or not you check your oil at all is orders of magnitude more important than precisely how you check it.
Pretty obvious everyone on this thread checks their oil. What is your opinion regarding the OP's question about adding the extra 0.5 qts (5 qts instead of 4.5) of oil during an oil change?
 
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