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...When it comes to lowering and drag reduction, you just don't know, I don't know...OF
No need to debate and complicate something so simple- lowering the vehicle
reduces under turbulence, you can Google it or ask any engineer.

...I'd pay good money to see an odometer with 1000km on it...now THAT is a nice round number.

OF
I believe I can go over the 1000 Km if mostly highway, specially now that
most seats and extras are out and the van is lighter.
 

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Here you go OdyFamily:

Improving Aerodynamics to Boost Fuel Economy — Edmunds.com

Just click on the link, or read this partial extract, about reducing drag by lowering a car;
you can scroll down near the end for the Lowering vehicle in bold or lifting it:


"Comparing Vehicles' Drag Numbers It's easy to get a feel for drag numbers by comparing Volvo sedans. According to Frasher, during Volvo's boxy-but-safe era, a Cd of 0.36 for the 960 model was typical for a sedan. Today's Volvos have come a long way, with the much sleeker S80 coming in at just 0.28.

"Not too long ago, anything below 0.3 was considered a sports carlike silhouette," says Bill Kwong, Toyota's product communications administrator. Now, Toyota has several vehicles in the sub-0.3 range, including the Avalon and Camry at 0.28 and the Solara at 0.29.

Vehicles for which fuel economy is a primary goal receive even more focus on aerodynamics. For instance, Toyota's Prius is rated at 55 mpg (combined), and it has an outstanding drag coefficient of just 0.26.

Cars typically have a much lower Cd than pickups and SUVs, which sit higher, are bigger and have greater cooling needs. Cooling is a big deal, aerodynamically speaking, since it requires airflow into the vehicle through the radiator, which increases drag.

Steve Wegryn, manager of Ford Motor Co.'s aerodynamics department, says, "For trucks, we're anywhere in the range of 0.40 to 0.43, 0.44…. For cars, on the order of 0.30 to 0.34. And SUVs are somewhere in between 0.36…to…0.41."

How Automakers Improve Aerodynamics While some shapes are inherently more aerodynamic than others, aerodynamicists and designers subtly shape every vehicle to reduce drag. "We look at all areas of the car that come in contact with the air. Upper surface shape, under floor, wheels and even cooling and engine bay," says Ian Anderton, aerodynamicist at the Jaguar Design Studio in Gaydon, England. Automakers fine-tune the way the air attaches to the vehicle's surface, and the way it leaves the rear end.

To improve Cd, designers may make the following changes:

•Round the edges of the front end
•Tune the grille and fascia openings
•Tune the wheel openings
•Place spats (small spoilers) in front of the tires to reduce turbulence
•Tune the size and shape of the outside mirrors and their attachment arms
•Reshape the water channel on the A-pillars
•Adjust the front fascia and air dam to reduce drag under the vehicle
•Add side skirts
•Tune the deck height, length and edge radius
•Install a rear spoiler
•Adjust the angle of the rear window
•Tuck up the exhaust system
•Use a diffuser to tune air coming off the underside
•Install "belly pans," underbody panels that cover components and smooth airflow
Ford's Wegryn also predicts increased use of active aerodynamic devices in the future, such as:
•Active air dams that drop lower at higher speeds (when driveways and speed bumps are not an issue)
•Active rear spoilers that pop up to reduce lift at higher speeds, as on the Porsche 911 Carrera
•Active ride height that lowers the vehicle at speed, which Ford employed on the Lincoln Mark VIII and which appears on Mercedes-Benz vehicles with Airmatic suspensions. According to Mercedes, "Lowering the ride height at speed results in a 3-percent improvement in drag."
How to Improve the Aerodynamics of Your Car Automakers spend a lot of time optimizing vehicles' aerodynamics. But is there anything we can do to improve — or at least not degrade — the aerodynamics of our own vehicles?

It turns out the biggest gains are to be found on pickups — not by dropping the tailgate (a common misconception), but by installing a tonneau cover. "A tonneau cover improves the aerodynamics dramatically — on all pickup trucks," according to Ford's Wegryn. "In general, a tonneau cover can provide a drag reduction of 2 to 7 percent, depending on cab style, box length and overall vehicle Cd. Average fuel economy improvement ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 mpg." From an aero standpoint, it doesn't make a difference if you choose a soft or hard cover.

You'll also improve aerodynamics by:

•Reducing the use of roof racks
•Rolling up your windows and turning on the air conditioner at higher speeds, typically above 35 mph
•Replacing a broken or missing front air dam
•Lowering your vehicle
•Running narrower tires
•Choosing smoother wheels (ideally, flush discs like those on vehicles trying to set land speed records)

You can reduce your vehicle's aerodynamics by:

•Lifting it — "an inch of increased ride height degrades the coefficient of drag by about 10 drag counts [.01]," says Wegryn.
•Adding wider tires
•Choosing more "open" wheel designs (although, for many owners, this advantage will be offset by the fact that "open" wheels promote better brake cooling)
•Installing a bug shield
•Adding a rear spoiler, in some cases
As a rule, an increase in noise is a sign of increased drag that is reducing your aerodynamics."
 

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JSS, look at that list. It's a holistic approach by the engineers (the whole enchilada). You can't tell me you do just one, and it doesn't affect any of the others, negatively or positively. You only highlighted one item out of the entire list of good things to do. I agree that if you do a lot of stuff, it can have nice results...but...like I mentioned before, you have to do a couple others to make the deal work in amounts you can quantify.

Really, the only one that has the least effect on any of the others is the roof rack, because it is way out of the way of any of the others.

When it comes down to it, you don't know what just lowering our big box on wheels by a couple inches, without doing anything else on the aero equation, will do, and I don't either, without testing it, one variable at a time.

I do know that lifting the rear ride height on our 2003 by almost 1 inch has made a fuel burn difference when pitted against our 2002 in a head-to-head road trip, though. I never thought raising the vehicle anywhere would actually help our fuel economy. Explain that, since it doesn't line up with the provided list of things that are bad for fuel burn. :)

OF
 

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JSS... You only highlighted one item out of the entire list of good things to do...
No, I highlighted 2 items that are well known for many years.
If you feel raising your vehicle is better, then raise it a few inches, put a lot
of weight on it, and drive it off a clif- you will gain a lot of speed at low
miles per gallon regardless of air turbulence :rollingeyes:
 

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Well, thought it best to send this to the mod’s, asking to change this post. Last post sounded adversarial, and I’ll take the blame for that.

First, JDSS is correct with that list. In general, if you accomplish in part or whole his well-thought-out list of items in designing a car, you gain the benefit of reduced aerodynamic drag. He’s right in the general application of these.

My take was that with a slight lowering of our Odys (a specific modification), I don’t know if you can tell what the net effect will be unless you actually do knock off some ride height and drive the car and test the modification. There’s more to air under the vehicle than just what passes under the front valence. I just don’t know what the net result will be. Here’s why:

I raised the rear end of my 2003 Ody about an inch, and gained a slight increase in fuel economy at freeway speeds. We’d simultaneously used both Odys previously on road trips together during Scouting and big family get-together road trips, and we always garnered amazingly equal fuel burn numbers. I changed one variable which was supposed to worsen my fuel economy (increasing height of the rear axle, more frontal area due to uneven change in ride height), and it made fuel economy consistently and measurably better. Both cars have the same tires and fluids. My 2003 is no longer level (it has a visible nose-down stance), but burns less gas on the highway. :huh: I don't recommend raising ride height as a means of gaining fuel economy, because it is not supposed to do that.

After this simple change, on a 350-mile trip (about 270-280 miles freeway, plus about 70-80 miles city in the middle) my 2003 burns about a gallon less :dunno: than my wife’s 2002, and it’s been a repeatable measurement every time we’ve done this type of spring, summer and fall dual-Odyssey family road trekking. This never happened until I hiked up only the rear height by adding the Monroe Sensa-Trac load adjusting shocks in back.

Just using this as an example of how modifications may make sense on paper when applied in a general sense…but when you do one specifically, there may be other factors that the modification also affects, making for better or worse results, or no net gain. This change I did positively affected some unknown-to-me factor(s) in my van’s aerodynamics and outweighed the negative aerodynamic effect of increasing ride height and frontal area (I agree with JDSS…he is right…by that correct list, my fuel burn should’ve worsened, even if just a little).

Don’t know what happened, but I can’t complain about the net result. :worship:

OF
 

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Almost, but chickened out

I almost made the 500 miles on one tank today. Filled at Pilot in Cambridge, Ohio with unleaded regular and stopped again 490 miles later and put 18.09 gallons in. I chickened; thought that there was less fuel remaining.
Started with warm engine and Mobil 1 0W20. 2009 EXL, 30K miles.
3 pax, about 100 lbs baggage; cruise set at 73 mph. My Scangauge reported 28 mpg for that leg, although later in the day after other fillups it was only at 24 mpg at slower cruise.
 

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averaging in upper twenties :)

I did make 500+ on 3 consecutive tanks. Mostly highway driving and very little stop and go. 3 adults and a baby for 400 miles or so. Rest solo by me. By the way these are my first 3 full tanks. I am now at 1653 miles. Ran down the tank to the wire (range < 30 miles) only once. Over all I am averaging close to 28-29 now. 68 more miles on the range and have not gone for a refill yet. Pretty excited & fingers crossed :)
Been taking it nice and easy on the gas pedal. Never revved it up over 4 rpm. Just been mindful of the mpg dynamic calculator to try and keep it near 30 mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter #248
Sounds promising...
 

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....68 more miles on the range and have not gone for a refill yet. Pretty excited & fingers crossed :) ...
Keep on truckin'. :zoom:
 

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Update 2: on Mpg

I hit 490 this time. Could have pushed it to touch the 500 mark. Wife just had the empty sign popup and went for refill right away.

Long road trip w/ 4 adults + infant. Some street travel with all the seats occupied (about 30+ miles).

The dynamic fuel average peaked at 26.5 mpg in the onward journey for 140 miles. Avg dropped by almost 2 points by the time trip completed. It dropped rapidly once I started speeding @80+. Showed signs of improvement when driven at 70+ on reverse trip.

Also prior to that had run down one full tank, all city driving. Avg just about 21.5
Not disappointed.
 

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I got 140 On my last tank...Whoohooo
Dude, that was an old pic you posted in that other thread...you may be fit looking there, but I'll bet y'all are sportin' some extra "ell-bee's" (lbs.) to get those kinda poor MPG results. This will definitely help your mileage more than raising the rear ride height:



We can easily bust clean through 500 miles per tank in both Odys, but always interrupt it at mid-trip with lots of city miles for things like shopping, kid activities, etc....thus keeping us from the 600-mile gold ring.

I'm going to raise the rear ride height on our 2002 with some Monroe Sensa-Trac Load Adjusting shocks next month, and see if it can catch back up to our 2003 in terms of fuel economy. For now, the 2003, with the higher ride height, is the better candidate to get through 600 miles.

OF
 

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This van is amazing.

Long time lurker, first time poster. First off, the Odyssey is truly an amazing machine! We purchased our 2006 Odyssey EX new back in February ’06. It now has 58,480 miles on it. We have taken it on many family vacations all over the West and have enjoyed the van immensely.

We decided over the memorial day weekend to participate in the 500 mile club challenge. We loaded the van with five of us and all our gear and drove down to Southern Utah (including trips to Zions National Park, the “fingers of death” trail, and other small trips around the St. George area.) I was amazed at the mpg results. According to the Scanguage, we averaged nearly 33.8 mpg (mostly freeway driving.) I was also shocked at the miles. We hoped to be members of the 500 mile club. We ended up squeezing 727.2 miles out of the one tank of gas! Fill-up was 21.402 gallons when we finally made it to the gas station. We could have driven all the way from Salt Lake City and back on one tank without a fill-up along the way. Needless to say, we love our Odyssey.
 

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Congratulations "odyfam" on your awesome trip around Southern Utah which IMHO is spectacular country side. We love every place there...including amazing and colorful geology of Bryce Canyon and superb undulating scenery near Escalante.

Odyssey is truly amazing car and perefect mini van to travel in grand style.

Just to confirm your enthusiasm, recently (Feb. 2011) we drove on our 2005 Odyssey EX from Calgary, across US (from Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska and so on) to Florida. There, in Florida we spend most of the time traveling to see what the state have the best to offer from Everglades to Key West and both side beaches...Then back to Calgary through northern states...All together we drove over 13 K km or 8K miles without any problem. Gas mileage superb. BTW - we like the price of gas in US...almost 1/3 less what we pay in Canada. E.g any fill up to full tank in US approx. 45 USD in Canada at least 65 to 75 Cdn !
What gas mileage we got it? Honestly I don't know because we did not care. Cheap gas, excellent freeways...and we enjoyed just smooth and comfortable driving.
On average we drove approx. from 5 to 8 miles above posted speed limit when conditions permitted to do that. Everywhere, Sheriff or other security fellows crated safe and hassle free conditions. We like superbly built “Rest Area” along any Interstate Freeways in Florida, operated by ‘armed security’ 24/7. For travelers like as - excellent welcoming and comfort to enjoy good security in public places.

Agree with you "odyfam" that Odyssey is an awesome family car.
Our future traveling plans? In the middle of our winter (Feb. 2012) our plans are to drive to California then from San Diego to drive across southern states: Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and so on...back to Florida for another 4 or 5 weeks :))

FYI- we almost every year organize long road travel across continent and we never unwelcoming experienced or surprise from Odyssey. This is perfect car for a long haul traveling.

Have a great day…
Cheers….zetwo
 

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New power steering pump=better MPG???

Our 2005 EX-L with about 60K on it would get a max of 350 on a good day downhill. Then, after dealing with it for over a year, I was able to have the dealer replace the bad power steering pump and reservoir for $100. Guess what, last weekend, the first full tank of gas since the power steering pump was replaced, we got 400 before the light went on. OMG! We thought something was wrong. We will try it again on this tank. Could the bad PS pump have been causing that much drag on the engine?
 

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Long time lurker, first time poster. First off, the Odyssey is truly an amazing machine! We purchased our 2006 Odyssey EX new back in February ’06. It now has 58,480 miles on it. We have taken it on many family vacations all over the West and have enjoyed the van immensely.

We decided over the memorial day weekend to participate in the 500 mile club challenge. We loaded the van with five of us and all our gear and drove down to Southern Utah (including trips to Zions National Park, the “fingers of death” trail, and other small trips around the St. George area.) I was amazed at the mpg results. According to the Scanguage, we averaged nearly 33.8 mpg (mostly freeway driving.) I was also shocked at the miles. We hoped to be members of the 500 mile club. We ended up squeezing 727.2 miles out of the one tank of gas! Fill-up was 21.402 gallons when we finally made it to the gas station. We could have driven all the way from Salt Lake City and back on one tank without a fill-up along the way. Needless to say, we love our Odyssey.
Not to be too judgmental, were you driving 45 MPH all the way?

Can you give us your average speed?

I tried it this weekend and at an average 65 MPH, I managed to get 465, before I chickened out and got gas, only to find there was 5 gals still left.

pat
 

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Tuesday will give me the big test, heading out on vacation for 2 weeks and have a 380 mile drive one way. Will finally get a chance to see what kind of mileage my 06 EX-L RES will get. Bought it this March but hardly use it since we live at work and use my 97 Avalon for getting around town. Will report back in when the first leg of the journey is complete.
 

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we made it easily

Our first fillup on the way from Keshena ,Wisconsin to Maimi,Florida was in Edinburgh, Indiana. We clocked 508 miles on 18.1 gal. :D You can do the math .I have a picture of the odometer for skeptics.:huh:

Overall we traveled 3901 miles in our 06 bringing our total on the car to 81600.
The average over 15 days was 24.7. The only trick I used was seldom ,if ever, going over 70 mph.:rollingeyes: I think constant monitoring of my new pax tires was also a positive factor. All the time in Fla we had 91 degrees or higher and the air was on constantly.

Doing "hand calculations" on one 380 mile segment we averaged exactly 29mpg (the same number as my trip computer). Again if you love math (who doesn't?);) you can see the 600 mile club would have been possible.

We sure do love this silver boxcar.
 
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