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I can't imagine ever getting even near 500, heck, even near 400 is in the danger zone of low fuel for us!

The best I've done so far is 22.67 mpg, all highway, all 74 miles/hr, all at night, no hills (Florida to Georgia), no stopping, earlier this week.
 

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It's taken some time reading this thread, however, i'd like to comment on a post some time back.


JyRO said:

To answer your question in the way that's relavant to my position: Why do I try to fill the tank to maximum capacity?

I think it all started years ago when I was curious as to what kind of gas mileage I was actually getting. I figured the hand calculation out by myself (meaning there was noone for me to ask, and the internet wasn't around). When I figured out how to do it, I wondered how would I know EXACTLY how much was in the tank if I stopped when it clicked. Because the amount of fuel dispensed can vary, probably by more than a gallon in some cases, from pump to pump at the "click," I was not satisfied that the results I would get would be accurate. The variation kills the accuracy of hand calculations.

I experimented with the pumps and found I could fill up to the neck and realized that was the most consitent way to judge the capacity of fuel I used on the previous tank. I continue to calculate mpg this way. ...
- JyRO

I too have always been interested in gas mileage, and quickly came to the same conclusion as JyRO about tank to tank fills. And with today's pumps and the Ody's "early" fill, it's even worse. My conclusion is a single tank calculation is quite worthless (unless using JyRO's filling method). There is a way around this however, and it's simply math. Just keep a running average. I've used several methods. One, use 3 (or 5) fillups (sum the gal's and use first and last mile for distance), this will average out the bumps. A computer program or spreadsheet makes this easy, i use a "sliding" mpg calc over 3 or 5 tanks. I also keep a total used average, (total miles driven since i bought the car, divided by total gals) Now that really flattens out the bumps.

I started this back in '91 with my Civic, then graphed the results, and learned something very interesting. the mpg slowly drifted up and down over time, then i noticed that trend was also seasonal. Higher in summer, lower in winter (makes sense really) but quite interesting seeing on a graph. (For what it's worth, i also noticed that not turning on the heat until temp guage came to normal made a big difference -- on the Civic at least)

So, for those that want accurate mpg numbers, but unwilling to follow JyRO's fill plan, just do the math.
 

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papa's ody said:
It's taken some time reading this thread, however, i'd like to comment on a post some time back.





I too have always been interested in gas mileage, and quickly came to the same conclusion as JyRO about tank to tank fills. And with today's pumps and the Ody's "early" fill, it's even worse. My conclusion is a single tank calculation is quite worthless (unless using JyRO's filling method). There is a way around this however, and it's simply math. Just keep a running average. I've used several methods. One, use 3 (or 5) fillups (sum the gal's and use first and last mile for distance), this will average out the bumps. A computer program or spreadsheet makes this easy, i use a "sliding" mpg calc over 3 or 5 tanks. I also keep a total used average, (total miles driven since i bought the car, divided by total gals) Now that really flattens out the bumps.

I started this back in '91 with my Civic, then graphed the results, and learned something very interesting. the mpg slowly drifted up and down over time, then i noticed that trend was also seasonal. Higher in summer, lower in winter (makes sense really) but quite interesting seeing on a graph. (For what it's worth, i also noticed that not turning on the heat until temp guage came to normal made a big difference -- on the Civic at least)

So, for those that want accurate mpg numbers, but unwilling to follow JyRO's fill plan, just do the math.
FWIW,

I agree that doing the math certainly is one way of getting overall results that are less affected by individual variation in filling. I think you can get relatively repeatabe results on a tank by tank basis, however, by taking the middle ground between JyRO's method of filling to the brim and the typical method of leaving the nozzle wide open until it shuts off. I have gotten reasonable results by simply going to a low flow (handheld) for the last 2 gallons or so. This creates much less foaming/turbulence as the fuel comes up the filler neck than filling with the nozzle wide open. While it doesn't get as much fuel into the tank as JyRO's, it does add a measure of consistency (some might say insanity! :) ) beyond what most people do.
 

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^ thats unpossible (Average MPG 25.2 MPG) nor my 26.2 avg..........:stupid:
 

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mejmea said:
FWIW,

I agree that doing the math certainly is one way of getting overall results that are less affected by individual variation in filling. I think you can get relatively repeatabe results on a tank by tank basis, however, by taking the middle ground between JyRO's method of filling to the brim and the typical method of leaving the nozzle wide open until it shuts off. I have gotten reasonable results by simply going to a low flow (handheld) for the last 2 gallons or so. This creates much less foaming/turbulence as the fuel comes up the filler neck than filling with the nozzle wide open. While it doesn't get as much fuel into the tank as JyRO's, it does add a measure of consistency (some might say insanity! :) ) beyond what most people do.
I think I may try slowing the flow down towards the end of a tank fillup. As for accurately measuring the fuel economy from tank to tank, I think this is pretty easy if you have some kind of fuel economy display. I would think this would be pretty consistent from tank to tank. The display could essentially be calibrated by using hand calculations over numerous tanks. Anyway, this is what I do.
 

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500.9 miles on a 1999 EX

This week I went 500.9 miles using my 1999 Odyssey EX for may work commute. My wife is out for the week so I had exclusive use of the van (no errands to cut mileage).

95 mile commute
15 mile 20-55 slow&go traffic
5 mile suburban - 4 stoplights
75 mile city freeway 60-65 steady speed.

149525.3 - 149028.4 = 500.9. 18.593 gal = 26.94 mpg

I filled at the same pump at the same station both times in the morning with the pump set on the 2nd slowest notch for a consistent fill.
 

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Likely the only way I could join the "500 mile club" is by towing the Ody behind a motor home, or something odd like that!

Now my Civic Hybrid... I filled up this am at over 620 miles on the tank and topped off at 11.2 gallons... yes, that's over 55MPG! 12.4 gallon tank, so I am going to try a 700 mile tank at some point!
 

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OdysseyFamily said:
Likely the only way I could join the "500 mile club" is by towing the Ody behind a motor home, or something odd like that!

Now my Civic Hybrid... I filled up this am at over 620 miles on the tank and topped off at 11.2 gallons... yes, that's over 55MPG! 12.4 gallon tank, so I am going to try a 700 mile tank at some point!
I'm definitely joining in the 500 mile club in 4 weeks on a trip. I may even go for 600 in the Odyssey.

As for my 2006 Civic Hybrid, the most miles on a tank so far is 657. My next tank is going at least 700 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #130
charlie1214 said:
As for accurately measuring the fuel economy from tank to tank, I think this is pretty easy if you have some kind of fuel economy display. I would think this would be pretty consistent from tank to tank. The display could essentially be calibrated by using hand calculations over numerous tanks. Anyway, this is what I do.
charlie - I do this as well, but never trust the M.I.D. :stupid: You're right on the money. There's probably some word for exactly what you describe, but in other threads I've said something like this, "the M.I.D. readout may not be 100% accurate, but it is relative ... meaning the error should be fairly consistent."

I'm not sure if I mentioned on this thread or not, but I did hit 600 something miles with it. :D Sorry if that's a repost.

P.S. - I was on vacation last week. I towed the camper with the truck ... no Ody. We got home yesterday in the afternoon, did some quick clean-up, jumped in the van and went out for lunch. That van felt like a LEXUS after being in my truck for nearly a week. Even if I could only muster 20 mpg, I'd still be happy with it. This coming from a diehard Toyota fan and x-Toyota employee.

- JyRO
 

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once my motor is "broke in" this will be "GAME ON" for me!!! then again I was able to get 1000 mile out of a MKV Jetta TDI in a cross country last fall. But those guys do that all the time.
 

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Ok I'm in! 502.0 miles over 19.3 gallons. I use Mobil1 synthetic on a engine with 27k miles.

Used regular fuel (87 octane), was 50% hilly terrain, uphill/downhill with some city driving in (20-25 miles). A/C was on the while time, with average cruising speed at 70mph.

Mind you, the van was packed with four full sized adults, a 2 1/2 year old toddler, and attached equipment as well as luggage. Went up north from California to Oregon and back. The trip up for some reason yielded only 22.5 mpg, but the trip back yielded 25.5mpg.

I noticed the sweet spot for the engine was betwen 65-70mph.

With the passengers/luggage out, without much hilly terrain/city driving, I wonder if 600 miles a tankful is possible?

All in all the Odyssey is one amazing vehicle!
 

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A while back I said that I would never make it to 500, but I sure came close last week. I made it to 483 and then chickened out right before I entered the FL Turnpike. Filled up with 19.771 gallons.

The low fuel warning was on for at least 25 miles. How many miles did I really have left?

This was in a fully loaded van, 2 adults, 5 kids, luggage, strollers, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #134
markr33 said:
The low fuel warning was on for at least 25 miles. How many miles did I really have left?
mark - The only hardpoint here to make a guess from is your low fuel light. Even though I've been able to squeeze 23 gallons into my tank, when the low fuel light comes on, it really doesn't go to much further. So just guessing, I would guess you could've went another 20 to 30 miles. The pucker factor would have been significant.
 

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JyRO said:
mark - The only hardpoint here to make a guess from is your low fuel light. Even though I've been able to squeeze 23 gallons into my tank, when the low fuel light comes on, it really doesn't go to much further. So just guessing, I would guess you could've went another 20 to 30 miles. The pucker factor would have been significant.
I knew I had a few more miles left, but I didn't know where the next gas station was located (sometimes they are far on the turnpike). But really did want to make the 500 - Oh well, I'll try again next summer.

I also switched over from 87 octane to 93 octane during this trip. I will be trying 93 for a few months.
 

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Discussion Starter #136
markr33 said:
I also switched over from 87 octane to 93 octane during this trip. I will be trying 93 for a few months.
Why?
 

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Discussion Starter #138
markr33 said:
To see if I get better performance and/or mileage.
Mark - You will not. You will get a lighter wallet though.

If anything, your performance will go (negligibly) down. Octane is used to make the ignition of fuel/air more spark plug dependant.

A lot of people say that higher octane fuels burn slower. That's not true. They burn basically the same speed, but hot spots, and heat/compression will not trigger ignition as easily. Higher compression engines (like a Corvette's engine) will cause 87 octane fuel to detonate. Meaning the fuel/air will spontaneously ignite due to increased compression/heat. This is bad for the engine.

Running higher octane makes the ignition dependant on the spark plug timing. That's octane's purpose.

Personally, I believe that due to the increased amount of octane in 93 octane gas for example, the fuel will have negligibly less energy than 87 octane. So therefore, an engine that will run 87 octane with no problems should have (possibly negligibly) more power and fuel mileage. You probably wouldn't notice the power, but the fuel mileage difference may be distinguishable.

- JyRO
 

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463 miles when the low fuel light came on. Filled the tank up at 467 miles. 17.9 gallons to fill up which resulted in 26.1 city/highway mpg. Per the manual, I still had a couple of gallons left in reserve so theoretically, had I not been on my way to a family day activity with the wife and kids (no one was in the mood for fuel-roulette), I could have easily turned 500 miles on the trip-o-meter.

This is an '06 Ody EXL Nav/Res with less than 6000 miles. Looks like my style of driving is paying dividends at the pump. It's hard to imagine that the mpg's will get better still as the miles rack up. VCM is a wonderful thing!
 

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Great Mileage

On a recent trip in my '06 EX-L to the Mid-West from Up-State New York, I went 442 miles on a tank, and the gauge registered 1/8 full. I squeezed 16.7 gals in the tank on the refill. That worked out to 26.46 MPG. I ended up driving 1575 miles over the round trip, and burned 59.3 gals for an average of 26.5 MPG.
I'm happy. I had 3 people in the van with luggage and drove about 70 MPH with the A/C on most of the time.

I imagine if I drove across Kansas with only the driver, and no A/C I could hit the EPA estimate of 28?
 
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