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Discussion Starter #1
My 2003 EX has just over 201K miles. During the last A/C checkup, the high side was about 25 PSI but the low side was good (about 35 PSI), telling me that the compressor was on its way out. Recently, it started clattering or ticking when the A/C is on, so I suspect it may go south sooner rather than later.

Given the high mileage, I’m tempted to replace the compressor myself. What I am not clear on is what other components need to be replaced (yes, I searched but couldn’t find any definitive info). Or, is there a way to purge the system of any potential debris? I’m assuming that wouldn’t involve merely pulling a vacuum on the system. If not, how is it flushed?

A laundry list of parts (compressor, receiver/dryer? evaporators?) that have to be replaced or descriptions of what work (purging, flushing, etc.) has to be done would be very helpful.

Thank you.
 

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I just did my own. I should do a write up on it.
I spent about $575 on a used compressor, a new condenser and the recharge. It took me about 12 hours not counting the 5 or so I spent reading the instructions and all the scary "black death" stories.
I had a local shop (Kent's in Spring Valley, NY, seem like good people) purge the system, they didn't charge anything for that. Then I pulled the compressor out the top, after taking out the alternator, and took the condenser out, too. Someone said they took their headlights out to get enough clearance but I loosened the radiator instead.
Take a good look at the dessicant (dryer). Mine had a few little bits of sparkly metal from the blown compressor but just a few on the bottom inch of it. I replaced the condenser cause they're really hard to get good and clean but if your dryer looks clean, you can probably reuse your condensor. The dryer should get replaced, though. Turns out I've got an extra, NOS one from Honda (you get one with the new condenser, I didn't know this) that I'd be happy to sell for the $20 that I paid.
I replaced all the O rings with one of the universal kits from Autozone. They said they could get an Ody specific kit for $5 or 6 but it wouldn't come till tomorrow. I should have waited cause, while the rings were all the right diameter, 3 of them were the wrong thickness.
Put it all back together and head over to Kent's. I'd had the system open for 3 days and it rained on 2 of them so I had them do a complete evac. Then I had them put the right 3 rings in and a charge.
That's all there was to it. If you've got the black death, I don't have any advise for you but if yours is still working you probably don't have that.
I have a mechanic uncle who says they pull all the lines and the evaporators every time cause they can't guarantee their work without doing that but he said I'd likely be just fine without going to all the trouble.
Have fun.
 

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Don't wait too long to do your job - it's not very fun to have to flush a system after full failure (did that on my old SAAB years ago).

I will be doing our 2004 EXL's A/C soon. It works really well - except for the clutch, which apparently is experiencing stator fialure.

During a recent (hot) trip to Arkansas the A/C began to act up. It cut out, then restarted blowing cold. When it runs, it cools fine, but after the first six hours of driving as we headed South, it would blow hot air for five minutes or so about every half an hour or forty-five minutes.

My investigation on the board and on our car guided me to the intermittent A/C clutch failure. It's only likely to get worse, so I have a new Denso compressor waiting to be installed. I thought of only doing the clutch, to save system emptying, evacuation, and system charge (plus new drier). But I bought the compressor because the job is awkward enough that I don't want to do it twice. I have a vacuum pump and a manifold, but no fancy Robinair machine to recover the R134a, so I will be looking for a shop to do that.

The one good thing about my predicament is that I don't expect to need to worry about a system flush either, since the compressor is still intact and the system is functional except when the clutch stator goes open. Sailorbenjamin, from my experience your $575 for the total bill is pretty reasonable. And in really hot weather the windows can't flow enough air to make up for lack of A/C.

Mariner4
 

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Mariner4,

What is the system flushed with? A detergent? Some recirculated and filtered liquid?

Thanks

Don't wait too long to do your job - it's not very fun to have to flush a system after full failure (did that on my old SAAB years ago).
 

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Mariner4,

What is the system flushed with? A detergent? Some recirculated and filtered liquid?

Thanks
You buy the AC flush in a bottle from auto parts store. Squirt it in the evaporator, condensor, and all the lines. Let it soak then blow out with compressed air. The bottle of flush should have directions just follow them. If you wait for your compressor to fail, it will break apart internally and throw debris in your system. I had one fail by seizing up and making my belt squeal. You could look up a you tube video on AC flush for a live demonstration.
 

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The problem with DYI flushes is that if the compressor did throw debris all over the system,
it will be very hard to get it all out without professional equipment. The debris may make the new compressor fail quickly too, and your DYI savings goes down with it. My mechanic said that if the comp is making noise, it's probably too late already. He wanted $1200 to do the whole job. I'm still reluctant to spend that much on a van that the tranny may go any day (and it's more of a spare car/recreation/haulling vehicle now).

This is a dual A/C system (front/rear) , so I would guess the debris has more places to hide, true?
 

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In my opinion unless you have experience doing AC work going DIY is a risk of your time and money. There are some things that can be done DIY but a flush and compressor replacement is a big job with lots of things to get right. On the other side I also understand that some people don't have $1200 to spend on that job to be done professionally, me included. If my compressor goes out I will just have to come up the money because I have had bad luck working on AC systems beyond just filling it with refrigerant.
 

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Sailorbenjamin, from my experience your $575 for the total bill is pretty reasonable.
Mariner4
The second hand compressor was a big savings, like $200 or 300. Higher for the oem unit. It was OEM from a low milage car so I took the risk, thinking that low milage OEM was better than new rebuild or no name. Wish me luck

blow out with compressed air.
Best to use dry air if you can get it. Paint shops have moisture traps on their air compressors, tire shops generally don't. Some of those compressors have a big puddle in the bottom of their tanks.
 

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Hey,

Can someone do me a favor? I am interested in a close-up photo of the AC Stator (take photos of both sides of the AC Stator).

Once you have the compressor out of the van, can you post a few photos of the PN 38924-P8F-A01?
All I want to know is that: does 2nd Gen Ody AC Stator has a thermal fuse built into the AC Stator?

The sequence is: 10-mm bolt ---> AC Clutch ---> Small Circlip ---> AC Pulley (bearing is embedded in Pulley) ---> Larger Circlip ---> Stator.

It is for a related thread for 2005-2010 Ody AC Clutch:
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-2005-2010-odyssey/93901-05-compressor-clutch-troubleshooting-8.html
 

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OK. (making a list): Compressor, Dryer, O-Ring Kit
Search Denso website.
I think the Denso PN is 471-1276 for your 2003 model.
Amazon.com sells this for $230.

Make sure you use good O-rings from dealer or Denso.

Yes, change the dryer too.

Once done:
1. Make sure you add appropriate amount of PAG oil!
There is a difference between factory PAG amount for the entire system and replacement amount for each individual item such as compressor or dryer.
Call Denso and ask the technical division advice.

2. Apply 30 min of vacuum and check for leak.

3. Recharge with R134a, look up for proper amount!
 
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