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Nemogira:
Would it be better if I installed the air lift when I change my springs to H&R or can I do it later? Also is there a switch that goes all the way to the front to inflate/deflate the air lift?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You COULD do it later but IMO, its easier to install the Airlifts when the lower control arm is unbolted and the rear springs are removed and out of the way. The Airlift instructions shows you how to install them w/o having to dissemble the rear suspension. Because if you do - you would have to get your wheels re-aligned.

But since your gonna get your wheels aligned anyway after the H&Rs are installed you might as well kill 2 birds w/ one stone and get them done at the same time. Question is...do you know of a shop that will do them both?

And Yes, they do have an option for a switch/gauge and an onboard compressor. I skipped on this option because I don't frequently deflate/inflate my Airlifts that much. But I would like to get one of these (just for the heck of it) in the future.

Note: Most difficult parts of Airlift installation:

1) Drilling hole in lower control arm
2) Cutting Jounce Bumper (Bump Stop)

-Nestor

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I have an airlift question too...

I had a similar product on my Toyota pickup, that I just loved. On that system, they didn't use a T connector though. Each bag was filled independently. The idea is, if you have an uneven load in the cargo area, the side with more wight above it will simply squirt the air over to the other unloaded air spring (through the T connector), not really helping as much with the uneven overload condition.

Comments?

Whenever I had to do anything under the back of my truck, I'd just air the springs up, and get a couple inches of lift. VERY handy. I'll put these on my '02 for sure, since I'll be towing too.

- Darell

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"Some people say you can't take it with you. I'm taking it with me."
Future: 2002 EXL-NAV, TW (with RES wanted!)
Current: 2001 Civic EX, silver
Leaving: 2001 Volvo V70 T5, white/graphite
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, it is very convenient to have them filled independently. I believe they do have that as an option on one of their packages. I settled for the less-expensive version because I wasn't sure how well it would handle it. So far, so good! I would and probably will upgrade one of these days.

Also, I just used it to prevent it from sagging. However I would NOT rely on it to balance out the weight distribution. That's some thing you need to properly layout in advance. Having an extremely unbalanced vehicle could be dangerous no matter how good your Air Lifts are.

-Nestor

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by nemogira:
If anyone's interested here's the actual installation instructions for the Air Lift suspensons.
</font>
Okay, I'm dumb...what is this supposed to do?

I have a friend in a wheelchair who has a van that can "kneel" to make it easier for him to get in. Does this do something like that?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by RWhittle:
Okay, I'm dumb...what is this supposed to do?

I have a friend in a wheelchair who has a van that can "kneel" to make it easier for him to get in. Does this do something like that?

</font>
No, the back of the Odyssey is notorious for sagging when loaded w/ heavy cargo. The airlift system is used to prevent this from happening. Check out the TECH section for more info.

-Nestor



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I didn't mean ACTUAL overloading. I meant loading enough to make it sag....

I would be surprised if the independantly-filled system costs anything more. You use one less T, and one more nipple. Cost should be the same. In fact, if they just tossed in another nipple, you could hook it up anyway you pleased without a separate kit.

I'll be looking into it once my van arrives. Thanks.

- Darell

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"Some people say you can't take it with you. I'm taking it with me." - Steve Marin
Future: 2002 EXL-NAV, TW (with RES wanted!)
Current: 2001 Civic EX, silver
Leaving: 2001 Volvo V70 T5, white/graphite
 

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The one drawback to the independently filled Air Lifts is the possibility (although remote) that one side could suddenly deflate and cause the van to become unbalanced in a violent way. At 80 mph on the ol' interstate, that could cause a Phord Exploder event. I have had several sets and some were inflated separately and some were on a common system. Just FYI.......

Jerry O.
2001 GG LX
 

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Air-lift suspension suppliers and part #s

does anyone have the actual suppliers and part numbrs for this..

I have called Firestone...Midas...and a few parts places...all with no luck...
 

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nemogira,

i have one question for you....... when you fill up the airbag with air, do you feel the rear of the ody skip when you do a right or left turn?
 

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odysman said:
nemogira,

i have one question for you....... when you fill up the airbag with air, do you feel the rear of the ody skip when you do a right or left turn?
No! In fact, making a turn is a much friendlier experience with the bags aired up to whatever the current load requires. Front end "push" is much less and steering response and over-all handling are improved.

Jerry O.
 

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Jerry O said:


No! In fact, making a turn is a much friendlier experience with the bags aired up to whatever the current load requires. Front end "push" is much less and steering response and over-all handling are improved.

Jerry O.
jerry,

where did you got yours installed at, I'm from the Bay Area, and was thinking to put a pair in the back to avoid that heavy laod look......:(
 

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odysman said:


jerry,

where did you got yours installed at, I'm from the Bay Area, and was thinking to put a pair in the back to avoid that heavy laod look......:(
I bought mine at our local Les Schwab tire dealer. I do not know if you have any of their stores in your area, but, almost any tire dealer should be able to order and install them for you. I did my own installation, so I cannot comment upon the cost or quality of anyone else's job. If you get the Firestones, you might be interested in my description of the installation, since I did it a little differently than suggested in the instructions. If you do a search of my posts, you should be able to find it.

Jerry O.
 

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Jerry O said:


I bought mine at our local Les Schwab tire dealer. I do not know if you have any of their stores in your area, but, almost any tire dealer should be able to order and install them for you. I did my own installation, so I cannot comment upon the cost or quality of anyone else's job. If you get the Firestones, you might be interested in my description of the installation, since I did it a little differently than suggested in the instructions. If you do a search of my posts, you should be able to find it.

Jerry O.

thanks
 

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darelldd said:
I have an airlift question too...

I had a similar product on my Toyota pickup, that I just loved. On that system, they didn't use a T connector though. Each bag was filled independently. The idea is, if you have an uneven load in the cargo area, the side with more wight above it will simply squirt the air over to the other unloaded air spring (through the T connector), not really helping as much with the uneven overload condition.

Comments?

Whenever I had to do anything under the back of my truck, I'd just air the springs up, and get a couple inches of lift. VERY handy. I'll put these on my '02 for sure, since I'll be towing too.

- Darell

------------------
"Some people say you can't take it with you. I'm taking it with me."
Future: 2002 EXL-NAV, TW (with RES wanted!)
Current: 2001 Civic EX, silver
Leaving: 2001 Volvo V70 T5, white/graphite
 

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Airlift 1000 Individual Inflation vs. Tee Connector

Quote: I had a similar product on my Toyota pickup, that I just loved. On that system, they didn't use a T connector though. Each bag was filled independently. The idea is, if you have an uneven load in the cargo area, the side with more wight above it will simply squirt the air over to the other unloaded air spring (through the T connector), not really helping as much with the uneven overload condition.

Reply: The tee connector in the inflation line allows the pressure to equalize under load, and will permit the vehicle to lean and maybe sway more in a bumpy curve. A single inflation point defeats some of the advantage of Airlifts. Individually inflating each Airlift is desireable and advisable. If the vehicle is not level when inflating the Airlifts (with individual inflators - no tee), the inflation pressure will not be equal when the vehicle is level. The pressure in the Airlifts will vary significantly with a major change in load, by the way.
 

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Re: Airlift 1000 Individual Inflation vs. Tee Connector

riverman said:
Quote: I had a similar product on my Toyota pickup, that I just loved. On that system, they didn't use a T connector though. Each bag was filled independently. The idea is, if you have an uneven load in the cargo area, the side with more wight above it will simply squirt the air over to the other unloaded air spring (through the T connector), not really helping as much with the uneven overload condition.

Reply: The tee connector in the inflation line allows the pressure to equalize under load, and will permit the vehicle to lean and maybe sway more in a bumpy curve. A single inflation point defeats some of the advantage of Airlifts. Individually inflating each Airlift is desireable and advisable. If the vehicle is not level when inflating the Airlifts (with individual inflators - no tee), the inflation pressure will not be equal when the vehicle is level. The pressure in the Airlifts will vary significantly with a major change in load, by the way.
I have used air bags both with a "siamesed" hook-up and individual lines (on the same car) and noticed no difference in performance. Lean and sway in corners does not really cause enough transfer of air to matter, in my experience, except, maybe on a long sweeping turn.

Yes, the air pressure does vary with a load change. That is why we inflate the bags to whatever pressure we want to use BEFORE we add the load. Air Lift, at least, always said NOT to use the bags to "lift" the rear of the vehicle after the load is in place. It's just like inflating tires cold. Set 'em and forget 'em.

Jerry O.
 

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Re: Re: Airlift 1000 Individual Inflation vs. Tee Connector

Jerry O said:
I have used air bags both with a "siamesed" hook-up and individual lines (on the same car) and noticed no difference in performance. Lean and sway in corners does not really cause enough transfer of air to matter, in my experience, except, maybe on a long sweeping turn.

Yes, the air pressure does vary with a load change. That is why we inflate the bags to whatever pressure we want to use BEFORE we add the load. Air Lift, at least, always said NOT to use the bags to "lift" the rear of the vehicle after the load is in place. It's just like inflating tires cold. Set 'em and forget 'em.

Jerry O.
I have the individual gauges installed. These gauges fluctuate instantaneously with road bumps, and the pressure increases noticeably when I load the vehicle. The pressure can vary maybe 10 psi in a corner, maybe more, maybe less - I haven't paid that much attention to this recently (I will, next time I drive the car). This translates directly into support for the vehicle - isolating one bag from the other. The pressure between Airlifts will equalize quite rapidly in a turn when the siamese hookup is used, and you will lose the additional support from the differential pressures while turning. Whether you or I would feel this is another issue.

What I have found is that I'm not as sensitive, as I often would like to think, when it comes to things subjective, like this. But because of the gauge readings I observed, I would strongly advocate individual inflation valves. I have also noticed that these bags seem to "leak down" fast compared to my tires. They might need pumping 3 times more often than tires.

I thank you for the procedural reminder about inflating the bags. I have just keep them at or under 35-40 psi with the installed compressor, when the vehicle is loaded. I deflate them, otherwise, to about 10 psi. Next time I'll put in 35 psi when the vehicle is empty, and see what I get fully loaded.
 
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