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Discussion Starter #1
I've been running Bosch +4 in 2000 Ody as well as my two other vehics. Recently, I've learned that these plugs run a little hotter. Would this affect fuel economy?

What is the best plug to use for maximum gas mileage? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
OK. A few thingsthings:

1. Anyone have an opinion on the Pulstar plugs? I've read where mileage could increase from 0.5-4.0 MPG.

2. When I bought the Bosch +4's for '00 Ody last week, the salesman argued with me that these were the wrong plugs, "Bosch is for European cars and NGKs are for Asian cars, which is what led me to look into this. I had assumed for the past 15 years that the Bosch+4 plugs were the best.

3. I just replaced the Bosch +4's with NGK Irridium's in my '98 Camry. The Bosch's had about 90,000 on them, and (first time I've seen this) the platinum electrode in the middle of the white insulator of two of the plugs had eroded (degraded) about a millimeter below the surface of the ceramic insulator, which would increase the gap width.
 

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Is there a symbol which I can use for head_banging_against_the_wall?

Seriously, *FORGET* Pulstar and any other gimmic spark plugs. Stick with OEM NGK platinum or Iridium. They are not that expensive when you purchase them on Amazon. The following had 152K miles on them when I replaced them. Can you tell me why I would try to buy anything but OEM after looking at the original?



 

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Auto manufacturers spend millions in research and development to achieve higher fuel economy.

If a $5 or $10 spark plug truly had any significant proven increase in fuel economy, every car would come out of the showroom with them installed.


Stick with the NGK's, they build a great reliable plug that your Ody engine was designed to use. The best thing you can do is ensure that the spark fires when it is suppose to at the intensity it is suppose to, anything beyond that is hype :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
LOL. Agreed, guys. Great pics, sontakke. Honestly, there's so much bull out there, it's hard for lay people like me to sift through what's significant and what isn't. I hate gapping plugs, thus another reason I've used the pre-gapped Bosh +4's for years. Am going to start buying NGKs from here forward.

We take a 2,000 mile round trip each year to visit family. I'm thinking about running the Bosch's I have in my '00 Ody on the way down and Irridium NGKs on the way back to compare gas mileage.

Also, I just found out that the Bosch +4 plugs I was running in my CR-V for the past 90K miles were the WRONG ones. Parts store (6 years ago) sold me 4418's instead of the 4428's the car calls for. I've had some new 4428's sitting in the garage for 3 years and just traded them out for the 4418's in the CR-V. Parts guy told me these should run cooler than the 4418's I had in there. I'm going to check and see if that makes any difference in gas mileage. After I do that, I may replace with NGK's and compare mileage again.
 

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IMO - I would never stick a Bosch spark plug in a Japanese engine (Honda, Toyota, Nissan). I had two very bad experiences with Bosch plugs in a Nissan Pathfinder and in an older Honda accord. The accord actually 'welded' the gap shut :)

I am not proficient enough with plug terminology to explain exactly why, but it has something to do with the resistance the electronic ignition is expecting to find at the plug, Bosch tends to run high for Japanese spec ignitions. Stick with NGK and in a pinch, use Denso, don't ever use Bosch.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
CORRECTION: Parts guy told me wrong. The 4418's I was running in the Honda were actually COOLER than the 4428's the engine calls for. What's interesting about this is that I put 90K on these cooler plugs and no fouling. That's a good sign.

As far as I can tell, the only reason you would want to run a hotter or cooler plug is to prevent fouling. IS this true?? If so, then contrary to what some say, how hot or cool a plug is may have little to do with fuel economy.

I thought you might also like to see the following comparison I did (which I posted on another string):

When I was doing a spark test with the grounded plugs connected to the coil packs, I tested an old beat up NGK as well as a Bosch +4 4418 and 4428. The Bosch sparks were visible, but not nearly as bright blue as the NGK sparks. Don't know if this means anything, but it would be nice to get a video of this on YouTube for everyone to see what I'm talking about. For the +4's, the spark would extend from the center electrode to one of the outer 4 ground electrodes for a while and then switch to another and then jump back and forth between electrodes, but it defies the laws of physics for the spark to jump simultaneously to more than one ground electrode. . . so I fail to see how having more than one ground electrode would assist combustion.? If anything, it seems as if all the extra electrodes get in the way of exposing the fuel mixture to the spark. Making me wonder more if this isn't a gimmick, as has been suggested.Is this true??
 
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