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I was trying to change my alternator today, I forgot to disconnect the battery negative terminal. while I was disconnecting the wire from the alternator
the one with a nut, I had a electrical spark and realized I forgot to take the batt negative terminal. was able to change the alternator but now the car has no electric power, even the dome lights does not light up. did I blown a fuse? please help me trouble shoot it.
 

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Follow the thick electrical cable up from the alternator to the fuse box on the passenger side of the engine compartment. Pop the cover off of that box. You'll see where that cable connects to a special fusible link and then connects to another thick electrical cable that goes to the positive terminal of the battery. That fusible link is probably blown. You'll need to start checking voltages there and see where things go wrong.
 

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I don't recall what it looks like in there exactly to know if it's easy to spot if it's blown but you can take a volt meter and connect the black lead to ground and then check each side of that terminal. You should have 12V on each side of the terminals. If you have 12v on the rear side but not the front side then it's obvious it's blown. It's there to protect from exactly what happened so I'd bet my lunch money it's blown.
 

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As a tip for next time, or anyone else reading, nobody likes to disconnect the battery because of all the radio codes that have to be entered. When changing the alternator you can carefully disconnect at that terminal that connects the alternator wire to the fuse. That way the car stays powered but the alternator does not. You have to be careful not to short it while putting your wrench on it but that's how I did it when I changed my alternator.
 

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I know this thread is years old but can somebody please tell me if I can just bypass this fuse and hardwire my alternator to my battery?
 

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What would cause it to start a fire?
An accidental short circuit, failed alternator, etc. Any number of unplanned events could cause a fire if not properly fused. Even if it didn't start a fire you would melt wiring somewhere. A fuse is designed simply burn out when a short circuit occurs. It's the same reason you never, ever, replace a fuse with one of a higher amperage.
 

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This is a good reason to NOT replace the fuse with a wire.
Okay so when my base hits my lights and everything go dim I have hooked up stereos and amplifiers for years and this is the first time I have ever seen a power wire going from the alternator to a fuse box before it goes to the battery
 

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It's your car. You can do what you want. Remember, an accident can short out wires, too.

Most likely, the proper set up would be a larger battery and a larger alternator. You're still limited by the fuse size but you could increase all the wire size if you can find a bigger fuse. They designed it with a fuse for a reason. Older cars had fusible links that looked like a wire but were designed to blow should a short occur. It's likely you had those and didn't know it.
 

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Okay so when my base hits my lights and everything go dim I have hooked up stereos and amplifiers for years and this is the first time I have ever seen a power wire going from the alternator to a fuse box before it goes to the battery
When everything "go dim", then it has NOTHING to do with fuse (if it was, then fuse will blow and NOTHING will light up) but probably have everything to do with alternator/battery not able to support enough amperage that your audio system is drawing.
You COULD wire the audio system directly to the battery with inline switch/and appropriate fuse in between but still alternator may need to be beefed up to support the power draw if you do not want to "draw down" the battery.
 

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If you increase alternator output you need a larger B+ feed wire to accommodate the increase in amperage.
 

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This is probably a topic for another forum...one dedicated to aftermarket audio installation. The kind of wattage you're pulling often requires big modifications in the electrical system to do it right.
 

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Okay so when my base hits my lights and everything go dim I have hooked up stereos and amplifiers for years and this is the first time I have ever seen a power wire going from the alternator to a fuse box before it goes to the battery
My power with amp is roughly going to pull 150amp. Well it's capable of doing it. So I'm just trying to get the most out of what I got
When everything "go dim", then it has NOTHING to do with fuse (if it was, then fuse will blow and NOTHING will light up) but probably have everything to do with alternator/battery not able to support enough amperage that your audio system is drawing.
You COULD wire the audio system directly to the battery with inline switch/and appropriate fuse in between but still alternator may need to be beefed up to support the power draw if you do not want to "draw down" the battery.
See that's what I don't understand because at my amplifier I am only pulling about 700 watts and I have 130 amp alternator so I should be pulling almost double that before my lights begin to dim I appreciate all the input information is very much appreciated seriously
 
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