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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Some site shown start with the closest to the farthest to the master cylinder or other site shown from the farthest to the closest. Which is the right way?

Thank you,
 

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When I do brake fluid flushes I always start with the wheel furthest away, even on the Odyssey. That means right rear, left rear, right front, left front. However, the Odyssey service manual says to start with the left front, then go to right front, right rear, left rear. I'm not sure why. When I flush the system I like to vacuum out the reservoir and then fill with new fluid. Then I start at the right rear and flush until clean. Then I do the other wheels and it goes quick after that. Never had any issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you, John. Yes, that was very confused me when the Accord and Odyssey manual says to start with LF, RF, RR, RL but most of European and other cars online says RR, LR, RF, LF.
 

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If youre raising the car its a good idea to slightly angle its level on the jack stands so the right rear is the lowest point of the vehicle. This way youre always bleeding uphill and any bubble (air pocket) introduced to the system will tend to move to what you bleed last. Or isnt where you bled first.
Not sure if I worded that right but have heard thats the way to do it to avoid a trapped bubble working its way up to the master cylinder a few miles after you have it on the road. (Which happened when I replaced my first master cylinder around 1985 on a trans am. 60 mph traffic stopped in front and the perfectly fixed brakes saw the pedal go to the floor. I did not panic and 3 quick pumps got the car stopped just in time)
I think you could also accomplish the same thing lowering the jack on the right rear first or raising the left front really high as you bled that (last).
Since its gravity and motion that dislodges the air pocket and allows it to migrate up to the master cylinder (where instead of a mushy pedal we now get total loss of braking) we are just trying to use gravity and motion to our advantage to remove the bubble rather than pressure alone and assume our bleeding procedure went flawlessly.
Which if you do it alone may not be the case.
 
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