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Has anyone discovered a brand of brake rotor that doesn't warp so easliy? We have 37K miles on our 2000 LX and have been having problems with warped, pulsating rotors for a while now. I'm pissed at Honda because yet again during the warranty period they denied my complaints about the brakes as a 'wear item'. Of course then I find out that there is (was?) a TSB related to warped rotors. Nice job Honda service... :mad:

I am planning on doing a pad change and will either go with the OEM pads or Australian Axxis Deluxe+ pads. I had excellent results with Axxis' metal pads on my track car and have been using the Deluxe+ pads on all my passenger cars since. I'd be willing to try them on the van but I don't know if they even have an application for it. I also don't know how they would perform on a heavy van.

When I do the pads I'm either going to replace the rotors or have them turned. I cringe at the thought of turning them but it seems to be common practice from Honda (speaking of which, what is this about the need to turn *brand new* rotors???).

I see on this board that it's 50/50 wether the OEM discs warp easily - some people go for 100K miles while others (like me) start warping under warranty. We live in the country so we probably do more 50mph->0mph stops than most but we don't have much stop/go traffic. I was surprised how quickly we started having warping problems. I'd prefer to go a little further the next time around.

thanks,
Keith
 

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I have the AXXIS pads on my 90 Bronco II, and I've put over 25k on them in heavy stop-and-go driving and there's still plenty of meat on them. The rotors are OEM, and they're starting to warp just a tiny bit. I turned them before I installed the AXXIS pads. As far as rotor brand, I've always just used whatever was at the local auto parts store. I installed $20 rotors on my wife's Sunbird in the past and they never warped at all. I would assume drilled rotors would cool more efficiently and not warp, but I don't know for sure. Anybody else have any experience with aftermarket rotors?

P.S. I've had no trouble yet with the pads or rotors on my '00 LX, but I still only have 19k on it.
 

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I had very early rotor warpage on my Caravan and replaced with Bendix OE type rotors, which, at last count had gone around 40K miles (the van is still in the family) and are straight. In my experience, rotors which are badly warped are poor candidates for resurfacing, since you lose so much mass that they soon do an encore and begin to "wobble". Good luck!

Jerry O.
 

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Rotors

I have had excellent luck with Brembo rotors. I have eaten them up using really hard pads (Rofren), and I have had them last longer with softer pads. I have had them plain, and drilled and slotted. I have never warped one yet.

One very common cause of rotor warping is CAR WASHING. People wash their car, or go to a car wash after driving (thus well warmed up brakes) and in an effort to clean off the inevitable buildup of brake dust, especially on the front wheels, a lot of water will hit the rotors. A fairly large area shielded under the pads, and presto, uneven rapid cooldown, a perfect recipe for warping.

I have read of this happening repeatedly to an Acura owner who always washed his aftermarket wheels down after spirited weekend drives, until somebody pointed out this was causing his repeated warped rotor replacements (under warranty, though). Maybe Honda rotors are more susceptible than others.

John
 

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Re: Rotors

John vdP said:
I have had excellent luck with Brembo rotors. I have eaten them up using really hard pads (Rofren), and I have had them last longer with softer pads. I have had them plain, and drilled and slotted. I have never warped one yet.

One very common cause of rotor warping is CAR WASHING. People wash their car, or go to a car wash after driving (thus well warmed up brakes) and in an effort to clean off the inevitable buildup of brake dust, especially on the front wheels, a lot of water will hit the rotors. A fairly large area shielded under the pads, and presto, uneven rapid cooldown, a perfect recipe for warping.

I have read of this happening repeatedly to an Acura owner who always washed his aftermarket wheels down after spirited weekend drives, until somebody pointed out this was causing his repeated warped rotor replacements (under warranty, though). Maybe Honda rotors are more susceptible than others.

Right on, John! Road & Track had a piece in the technical correspondence section some time back and their conclusion is that rapid cooling is the worst enemy of brake rotors. Race cars get their rotors exceptionally hot and they can remain straight for long periods of abuse. Yes, they are higher quality rotors designed for harder use, but, very quick cooling would undoubtedly warp them as well. Wheels of open spoke designs, in my experience, contribute to the warpage, even though most folks feel that brake performance will be better with such wheels. Yes, the brakes will run somewhat cooler all the time, with open spoked wheels, for the average person the brakes may hold up better with somewhat less air flow through the wheels. On my Caravan, I had some open wheels and had VERY early rotor warpage. When I installed my new rotors, I added some of those brake dust shields for the express purpose of holding some heat in the brakes and promote slower cooling. For me, it worked and I had no more rotor warpage. Just my experience and a couple of cents more on the subject.

Jerry O.
 

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I, too, used PFCM pads on those Bendix rotors, so who knows what solved the problem?

Jerry O.
 

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If you say so, but I had early warpage and DO NOT brake hard, except in emergencies. R & T has a lot of input from users and repair folks and I have to think they have a pretty good take on the subject. Go figure......

Jerry O. As much a clown as the next fella, Hee! Hee!
 

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I partially agree and partially disagree with Demond. Physics is indeed what is warping rotors, however, there is no such thing as "the rotors can't take the energy of hard braking". Tell that to the guys running races around a track!. Now ordinary street PADS will give out and fade, or even glaze over, but rotors just get hotter, upto glowing red.

On my Maxima I have gone through a number of different brands of pads. I drive that car "spirited", some may call that as a nut, but leave it to say there are many hard stops involved. I have never warped the oem discs, nor the three sets of Brembos I have been using since. I have eaten up a set of drilled / slotted Brembos in 15K miles (using very hard, aggressive pads), but they did not warp. (and yes I have had them glowing red)

Cheap quality rotors may not deal well with the heating / cooling cycles. I am not suggesting Honda parts are cheap, but there must be something about the material of the rotors that make them more susceptible to warping. I have never heard of BMW brakes warping, but I have read about it many times involving Acuras and Hondas.

Even if you don't water down the brakes when hot. The fact that the pads remain in contact with the isc leaves the majority of the disc exposed to air, but some nestled in pads. These two areas will cool at different rates. Certain steels may thus warp, where others won't. Sprited driving, of course, will exacerbate this issue, which is to Demond's point, but I believe it's the materials, not the driving style, because the same driving style in different automobile, (or the same car with different rotors / pads) will go through life without warping.

For those who have had repeated problems, I would suggest use a set of Brembos (they are not all that expensive, especially if you leave them "blank" as opposed to drilled and/or slotted) and use the SAME type pads. Different discs will not affect your braking performance, and if they don't warp, you are ahead of the game.

John
 

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I hate to rain on your parade, but I had a set of Brembo rotors warp in less than 10,000 miles on an old Volvo wagon. I made a couple of hard stops, but that was it.

The original equipment rotors lasted 200K miles before warping. So far, I am NOT impressed with Brembo rotors.
 

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Brembos warping

Yeah, I too had a set of brembos warp in about 10K miles- on my Ody. I live in the mts in PA, so the brakes repeatedly get hot, but I had hoped the brembos would last better than the OEMs. Anybody with good experience with other rotors??
 

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That Caravan now has over 80K on those good Bendix rotors and I drove it recently and they are still straight. Not bad for LA county driving!

Jerry O.
 

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i got brembos on my volvo 850 and i don't have the warping problem but find them wearing down alot faster than the oem volvo rotors. i'm not running any aggressive pad either, just oem volvo ones. i bought some zimmermans on my mb190-16V and they worked great, they seem to last alot longer but it could be the pads. used pagid(sp) pads on the 190. i would have thought that brembos would be the best since its what ferrari uses...
 

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I put the Brembo Rotors on my 01 with a set of OEM pads and they started to warp in under 8,000 miles. I am not impressed with them and I won't buy them again. I guess I'll give the Honda Rotors another shot on the next time around.
 

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A very common cause of rotor warp is improper torque on the lug nuts. If anyone has tightened them with out a torque wrench, then there is a good chance this is the cause. Make sure when you have the wheels removed by any service shop you make them torque them to spec.
 

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I routinely torque the wheel bolts on my cars whenever a wheel goes on a car. Even so, that didn't help the Brembo on my old Volvo.

I just hope the Brembo rotors on my New Volvo hold up better than the replacement ones on my '83 volvo.:eek:
 

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Of course there is the issue of not using the emergency brake. If you stop fast then park the car and apply the emergency brake, good chance you will warp your rotors.
 

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Question about warping

One little question- those of us who have experienced warping, is it a permanent thing (i.e. warp and remain so even after cooling) or is it something that only appears when the rotors get hot? Mine is for the most part an issue that appears when the rotors heat up- as in downhills- and then the rotors return to a relatively normal state (a tiny bit of pulsation is detectable in normal driving).

And I torque with a torque wrench, I understand about downshifting on long grades, I understand about not sitting at the bottom of the grade at a stop sign with the pads in a single spot on the rotors and going through puddles with hot rotors. Yet, still this occurs.

Seems like on one hand, it is unavoidable that some heat distortion would occur, since the "hat" portion of the rotor is part of one of the friction surfaces, therefore that surface will dissipate and retain heat differently from the other side, but if the metal reacted uniformly, should cause uniform deformation, I'd think.
 

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Lots of theories about warped rotors floating around the internet. Check out stoptech's website. http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_warped_brakedisk.shtml

"in more than 40 years of professional racing, including the Shelby/Ford GT 40s – one of the most intense brake development program in history - I have never seen a warped brake disc.

n fact every case of "warped brake disc" that I have investigated, whether on a racing car or a street car, has turned out to be friction pad material transferred unevenly to the surface of the disc. This uneven deposition results in thickness variation (TV) or run-out due to hot spotting that occurred at elevated temperatures.

In order to understand what is happening here, we will briefly investigate the nature of the stopping power of the disc brake system."

This info comes from a brake manufacturer in the street and race business - come up with your own conclusions.

I use a very agressive break-in technique on new pads and generally everything is fine and lasts a long time. I do not turn rotors at pad changes unless there are some deeper grooves. Some rotors are expensive and worth turning and some are cheap enough to replace often. With timely quality pad changes and proper bed in techniques - I routinely get
over 100k miles on a set of rotors. Although I do agree that some rotors are crap and undersized for certain vehicles and driving habits.
 
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