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I've seen all these reports of unexplained soft brakes and am unsure what to make of it. My 08 Touring has great brakes. The pedal is high, solid and it stops on a dime. I can easily activate the ABS if I want to. There are only a few components in the system. The booster, the master cylinder, the ABS control unit, the lines, and the calipers. It could definitely be air in the system, though the Honda bleeding process is no different than any other process. I've seen nothing about activating the ABS unit while bleeding brakes on this vehicle. The procedure for replacing the module is to bleed normally and if the pedal feels spongy after that to bleed again. For whatever reason, Honda recommends starting with the left front, going to the right front, left rear, right rear, which is opposite of what I learned about starting with the wheel furthest away.

It's also very possible that there is a defective brake pad that is delaminated from the backing or split. I saw that once on a new pad on a vehicle. Also, sometimes the metal anti squeal backing plates can also cause some springyness that could cause a spongy pedal. A defective rubber brake hose could cause it, a leaky master cylinder could cause it, a bad ABS unit could cause it. Personally, if I were in this predicament I'd start with the least expensive and work my way up. New pads/rotors all the way around with careful attention to every detail. I'd also replace all the rubber brake lines and go from there. I don't think putting the Pilot brakes on is needed, personally, since these brakes will stop the vehicle nicely (when working properly,) but that's a decision left up to you.
 

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DV, are you saying you've had bad brakes since the van was new? Not to be rude, but why did you keep it?

Did you ever get the Honda zone manager to drive with you? If you have paper records, and they haven't fixed it, then Honda is still responsible for it.

If you can find a quiet section of highway, put out a marker, drive past the marker at 60 mph and slam on the brakes. Measure the stopping distance, which should be about 140'. From 30 mph, it'll probably be about 30 to 40 feet, but again, you've got to slam the pedal.

Doubling your speed will quadruple your stopping distance. From 120 mph, you won't stop at all!
 

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So. I am torn. I am getting ready to now do the upgrade. I am at 95K on the original brakes/rotors. No pulsating or vibrations. Just a squeal when backing up which I am sure I can fix by re-greasing the pad/piston. Planning to get the timing belt work done at John Clark's place in the upcoming weeks. The wheels/tires combo is next and the brakes there after.

I see someone did MDX front and back. I am not sure if I missed it but if I do the same, does the dust shield in the back also need to be bent?

What if I get the Pilot rear calipers?

Anyone done any homework on this so that I can save research time?
I'm going to do this upgrade in the spring. Have front calipers from a 2010 Pilot and rear calipers from a 2009 (IIRC) MDX ready to go, along with Centric rotors and EBC pads all the way around, plus a set of braided steel lines. I was a bit concerned about the caliper upgrade having a weird effect on the brake bias - I'm kind of conscious about this, because my old Trans Am was so badly set up from the factory that the ass end would start to come around when stopped on a slick surface unless I mashed the pedal into the floor. The rear calipers did almost nothing until you really stomped the brakes. Not wanting to repeat that, I did a bit of research as follows:

Stock '05 - 10 Odyssey front calipers use 2x 45.7mm diameter pistons each. Rears use a single 40.6mm diameter piston. Doing the math on this (if I did it right), gives us a ratio of 71.7% weighted to the front.

*Note that this is based ONLY on ratio of total surface area of caliper pistons front to rear - I know there are lots more variables to this, even before you take into account any other systems in the car that may affect this or interfere with it in some way. I just wanted a basic guideline to know where I was starting from, and to make sure I wasn't changing things too much.

The 2010 Pilot has 2x 48mm pistons up front, 1x 42mm piston in rear, giving that vehicle a ratio of 72.32% front to rear.

The 2009 MDX has 2x 51mm pistons up front, 1x 43mm piston in rear, for a ratio of 73.78% front to rear.

So, not much different really. Any combination would probably work fine without affecting the balance too much. BUT, if we put Pilot calipers up front, and MDX calipers in back, we end up with a ratio of 71.36% front to rear, which is only an 0.34% shift to the rear off of the stock balance of the van, but with bigger calipers, pads, and rotors. Without any other information available (at least, not without doing a ton of research), it seemed to me like this would be the best combination for this project.

All that said, there are a million variables that I couldn't account for because I didn't have the data in front of me (ratio of piston area to pad surface area, distance from center mass of pad to hub, etc). There are bias calculators you can look up online, but the ones I saw required a lot of really technical specs that most people outside of race teams and automotive engineers will not have access to, so I had to improvise with very imperfect napkin math.

For reference, the stock Ody rotors are 295.91mm front (vented), 312.67mm rear (solid). Pilot and MDX both use the same rotors, 329.69mm up front (vented), and 333.76mm rear (solid). Pilot and MDX use the same pads front and rear as well.
 

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I've seen all these reports of unexplained soft brakes and am unsure what to make of it. My 08 Touring has great brakes. The pedal is high, solid and it stops on a dime. I can easily activate the ABS if I want to. There are only a few components in the system. The booster, the master cylinder, the ABS control unit, the lines, and the calipers. It could definitely be air in the system, though the Honda bleeding process is no different than any other process. I've seen nothing about activating the ABS unit while bleeding brakes on this vehicle. The procedure for replacing the module is to bleed normally and if the pedal feels spongy after that to bleed again. For whatever reason, Honda recommends starting with the left front, going to the right front, left rear, right rear, which is opposite of what I learned about starting with the wheel furthest away.

It's also very possible that there is a defective brake pad that is delaminated from the backing or split. I saw that once on a new pad on a vehicle. Also, sometimes the metal anti squeal backing plates can also cause some springyness that could cause a spongy pedal. A defective rubber brake hose could cause it, a leaky master cylinder could cause it, a bad ABS unit could cause it. Personally, if I were in this predicament I'd start with the least expensive and work my way up. New pads/rotors all the way around with careful attention to every detail. I'd also replace all the rubber brake lines and go from there. I don't think putting the Pilot brakes on is needed, personally, since these brakes will stop the vehicle nicely (when working properly,) but that's a decision left up to you.
As always, excellent advise John. I do not have spongy brakes. The pedal is firm and it does stop almost every day normally. But when its fully loaded and we have had to use the brakes a bit, then it gives you the fright of your life. The Pilot calipers are very affordable at salvage yards. The rotors which I plan to replace any way won't set me back a whole lot. I have not been able to activate ABS on a dry clear day but that most likely is perhaps because I have not stomped on the brakes that bad. Plus, at 95K I most likely have glazing and brake fading issue. I am sure I can simply do a pad change and get away with it.



DV, are you saying you've had bad brakes since the van was new? Not to be rude, but why did you keep it?

Did you ever get the Honda zone manager to drive with you? If you have paper records, and they haven't fixed it, then Honda is still responsible for it.

If you can find a quiet section of highway, put out a marker, drive past the marker at 60 mph and slam on the brakes. Measure the stopping distance, which should be about 140'. From 30 mph, it'll probably be about 30 to 40 feet, but again, you've got to slam the pedal.

Doubling your speed will quadruple your stopping distance. From 120 mph, you won't stop at all!
Not rude at all marvinstockman. Like I said, it does stop and stops well most of the times. Once in a while it does give us trouble but nothing where I'd get in a wreck. We do keep adequate distance when its fully loaded and we're in traffic using the brakes a lot. The recall that was done was not because of a problem but because I got the recall notice. We have never complained about the brakes to the dealers and now I am way out of warranty.
I will try out your stopping test but the van is primarily driven by the home minister so it will be a week or two.
 

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Nice thread here. I drive a 2004 VW Jetta TDI wagon and the front brakes on that are about the same size as this gen 3 Odyssey, and I wish those were bigger. My wife and I look to buy a 2010 Odyssey and it now has 16" wheels. I'll start searching through junkyards for calipers/brackets. We're in the rust belt (as in car rust) here so if I get stock calipers/brackets I'll probably trade up to Raybestos zinc plated which don't cost too much if I send back the proper core.
I'll search around on Craigslist and junkyards for 17" or 18" wheels.

This is an old thread but if anyone has any recent tips on what parts to buy and where I can find them, I would appreciate the input.

Wish me luck.
 

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Nice thread here. I drive a 2004 VW Jetta TDI wagon and the front brakes on that are about the same size as this gen 3 Odyssey, and I wish those were bigger. My wife and I look to buy a 2010 Odyssey and it now has 16" wheels. I'll start searching through junkyards for calipers/brackets. We're in the rust belt (as in car rust) here so if I get stock calipers/brackets I'll probably trade up to Raybestos zinc plated which don't cost too much if I send back the proper core.
I'll search around on Craigslist and junkyards for 17" or 18" wheels.

This is an old thread but if anyone has any recent tips on what parts to buy and where I can find them, I would appreciate the input.

Wish me luck.
U-pull junk yards aren't really a thing where I am, so I found some used calipers on Ebay. This was hit-or-miss. The Pilot front calipers I got are very nice, just need a bit of cleaning. The MDX rears were big balls of rust that vaguely looked like brake calipers, and one of the slide pins was seized up solid. I had to torch it out. I set up an electrolysis bath for the rears, and they came out pretty good, although I'm not done with them yet. Caliper rebuild kits were super cheap, so I'm going to rebuild all 4 prior to installation to get any old rubber out of there. Caliper rebuild kits, brake hardware kits, Centric rotors, two new rear caliper pins came from Rock Auto. Front and rear EBC Yellowstuff pads and Goodridge braided brake lines came from Amazon. I also got some paint for the rear calipers (might do front as well) to make sure they don't rust up again. My parts list:

Front calipers (2010 Pilot) - Auto dismantler via Ebay
Rear calipers (2009 MDX) - Auto dismantler via Ebay
Brake hardware kit (2010 Pilot front) - Rock Auto, Carlson 13555Q
Brake hardware kit (2009 MDX rear) - Rock Auto, Carlson 13501Q
Caliper pin kit (2009 MDX rear) - Rock Auto, Carlson 14202
Caliper rebuild kit 2x (2010 Pilot front) - Rock Auto, Centric 143.40028
Caliper rebuild kit 2x (2009 MDX rear) - Rock Auto, Centric 143.42034
Front rotors 2x (2010 Pilot) - Rock Auto, Centric 12040071
Rear rotors 2x (2009 MDX) - Rock Auto, Centric 12040072
Front pads (2010 Pilot) - Amazon, EBC Yellowstuff DP41801R
Rear pads (2009 MDX) - Amazon, EBC Yellowstuff DP41802R
Stainless braided lines (2005 Odyssey) - Amazon, Goodridge G-Stop 20026
 

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The Pilot brakes used to be an upgrade over at the Ridgeline forums, but now folks are starting switch to the MDX brakes as the front caliper piston sizes are a bit larger. Just like the Pilot, the MDX brakes are bolt on affair as well. The 330mm rotors and larger piston area offer good braking.

'10 MDX Caliper: 50.8mm | 2 Piston caliper | 4051.60 sq.mm | 330mm Front rotors
'10 Pilot caliper: 47.5mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3542.31 sq.mm | 330mm Front rotors
'10 Ody caliper: 45.5mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3250.29 sq.mm | 296mm Front rotors
'10 Ridgeline Caliper: 44.0mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3039.52 sq.mm | 296mm Front rotors.
* Above numbers are for each front caliper, not both combined.

As you can see, for the OEM replacement/upgrade, the MDX provides the most brake torque thanks to its larger pad and piston area. They are all direct bolt ons but need their respective caliper brackets/carriers.
 

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The Pilot brakes used to be an upgrade over at the Ridgeline forums, but now folks are starting switch to the MDX brakes as the front caliper piston sizes are a bit larger. Just like the Pilot, the MDX brakes are bolt on affair as well. The 330mm rotors and larger piston area offer good braking.

'10 MDX Caliper: 50.8mm | 2 Piston caliper | 4051.60 sq.mm | 330mm Front rotors
'10 Pilot caliper: 47.5mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3542.31 sq.mm | 330mm Front rotors
'10 Ody caliper: 45.5mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3250.29 sq.mm | 296mm Front rotors
'10 Ridgeline Caliper: 44.0mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3039.52 sq.mm | 296mm Front rotors.
* Above numbers are for each front caliper, not both combined.

As you can see, for the OEM replacement/upgrade, the MDX provides the most brake torque thanks to its larger pad and piston area. They are all direct bolt ons but need their respective caliper brackets/carriers.
Okay I will work towards the MDX caliper and rotor approach.

In looking at wheels, I like the Pilot design as it looks like it will be easier to keep clean vs. the double spoke Odyssey oem wheels. Should I be concerned about fitment of the 17" Pilot oem wheels with the MDX Caliper?
 

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I found 4 good Acura TL wheels at a local used parts warehouse, size 8Jx17ET55 $78.75 each. Odyssey stock would be 7Jx17ET50. So the new wheels are an inch wider with 5 mm more offset. I'll still use the 235/60R17 tire which can still fit on an 8" wide rim. Goodyear Assurance GT tires on sale with two rebates on Tirerack for $137 net each delivered. I looked around for a 255/55R17 tire but didn't find anything appealing. The Federal SS-595 is low cost but doesn't seem like a good choice for me in the snow belt.
I'm still trying to figure out a good approach to get the 2010 MDX Caliper. Emailed Rockauto about sending in an Odyssey Caliper core for credit if I bought MDX Cardone calipers, no answer yet.
 

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The Pilot brakes used to be an upgrade over at the Ridgeline forums, but now folks are starting switch to the MDX brakes as the front caliper piston sizes are a bit larger. Just like the Pilot, the MDX brakes are bolt on affair as well. The 330mm rotors and larger piston area offer good braking.

'10 MDX Caliper: 50.8mm | 2 Piston caliper | 4051.60 sq.mm | 330mm Front rotors
'10 Pilot caliper: 47.5mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3542.31 sq.mm | 330mm Front rotors
'10 Ody caliper: 45.5mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3250.29 sq.mm | 296mm Front rotors
'10 Ridgeline Caliper: 44.0mm | 2 Piston Caliper | 3039.52 sq.mm | 296mm Front rotors.
* Above numbers are for each front caliper, not both combined.

As you can see, for the OEM replacement/upgrade, the MDX provides the most brake torque thanks to its larger pad and piston area. They are all direct bolt ons but need their respective caliper brackets/carriers.
I think the issue with using the MDX calipers up front is that any upgrade involving swapping calipers with larger pistons will require proportionately more fluid to move said pistons, which translates to more pedal travel (unless the master cylinder is upgraded as well). According to what I've read on the forum here, it's not too significant when going to the 48mm Pilot calipers on the stock Ody MC, but I think it might be more of an issue when going to the 51mm MDX calipers. I'd find someone that has done that first and ask about it before jumping in.

I found 4 good Acura TL wheels at a local used parts warehouse, size 8Jx17ET55 $78.75 each. Odyssey stock would be 7Jx17ET50. So the new wheels are an inch wider with 5 mm more offset. I'll still use the 235/60R17 tire which can still fit on an 8" wide rim. Goodyear Assurance GT tires on sale with two rebates on Tirerack for $137 net each delivered. I looked around for a 255/55R17 tire but didn't find anything appealing. The Federal SS-595 is low cost but doesn't seem like a good choice for me in the snow belt.
I'm still trying to figure out a good approach to get the 2010 MDX Caliper. Emailed Rockauto about sending in an Odyssey Caliper core for credit if I bought MDX Cardone calipers, no answer yet.
Make sure the TL wheels have the appropriate load rating for the van. I read something (I think in the giant depax thread) about the sedan wheels being able to bolt up, but not having the load rating required for the heavy Odyssey.

When I was looking at this a while back, the best deal I found on zinc plated calipers that don't require a core was on Amazon.
R1 Concepts currently has a 2010 MDX front right caliper, zinc plated with bracket on Amazon for $84.07 w/ no core required and free shipping. Weirdly enough, the left front isn't currently listed but I'd shoot them an email and ask if they have it if you still wanted to go the MDX route.

Pilot ones are a bit cheaper, and they are currently showing both at $78.70/each.
Left
Right
 

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If you can find a quiet section of highway, put out a marker, drive past the marker at 60 mph and slam on the brakes. Measure the stopping distance, which should be about 140'. From 30 mph, it'll probably be about 30 to 40 feet, but again, you've got to slam the pedal.
So, I did try this out and I think I know what is going on in my specific case. Everytime we have had a scare, the van was fully loaded to the brim. It has stopped fine with the same load too.

I tried to make a panic stop from 60 and was able to complete it just fine. Van was not loaded. Just the Mrs and I. The pedal has not felt bad at all so its likely not the air in the system.

After a couple of these heavy stop trials (I admit, I did not measure the stopping distance in feet), the brake fade kicked in and then the stopping distance grew.

That means, I need new pads I think. I was planning out the whole upgrade which while I can get the 4 corners of the calipers for a song, I need new wheels and bigger tires, I think I will just get new pads and take it from there.
 

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I did the upgrade and drove to Mississippi this weekend to visit my daughter. I had a good test of the brakes when someone swerved in front of me to take an exit in Pennsylvania. The biggest drama I had was with the calipers.

I ordered MDX calipers from R1 Concepts, the price was good at $183.60 delivered for a pair. But they cancelled the order and sent my money back as they were unable to fulfill the order.

I emailed RockAuto about sending Odyssey Calipers back on a core credit for purchase of MDX Calipers, and they replied that the calipers returned had to match the ones bought. So I got a pair of Cardone calipers, part #s 19P-3278 and 19P-3279. These are zinc coated for MDX with brackets. Total cost with core charge, tax, and shipping delivered was $303.66. The pistons didn't measure any larger than the old calipers. I did not check the caliper to bracket slide bolt torque, figured they were tightened correctly. My wife called about a clunking sound when she was 10 miles from home last week. Both bolts had fallen out on one side. I went to Autozone and bought a new bolt/glide pin set for $15 and used the bolts. The bolts are M10x1.25 fine thread high strength 9.5. I tightened to 40 ft-lb and checked the other side, they were already tightened to around 35 ft-lb, added a little bit more. Must be the slide pin bolts were not torqued on the one side.

The Goodridge G-Stop 20026 stainless hose set was $133.86 delivered from Amazon. Definitely worth doing just this if nothing else on these cars. Nice product.

Brake pads were Centric and Wagner corrosion resistant rotors. Rockauto again. Pads part # 500.13780 and rotors BD180044E. Total delivered with tax $189.36.

We'll see how everything looks after a couple of New York winters of salt exposure.

I'll sell the oem calipers with rotors and pads. It's nice to have the 330 mm rotors now vs 300, but this upgrade was more of a headache than I had hoped for.
 

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DAMN! A very intense lesson to be learned. Could of ended REALLY badly. Always torque every single part of the suspension and brake components, especially on a minivan!

If someone still decides to go with the pilot BBK, go with OEM calipers. I had no success with aftermarket calipers in the past.
 

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DAMN! A very intense lesson to be learned. Could of ended REALLY badly. Always torque every single part of the suspension and brake components, especially on a minivan!

If someone still decides to go with the pilot BBK, go with OEM calipers. I had no success with aftermarket calipers in the past.
I'm not sure you read my post correctly. I bought bracketed calipers and the bolts which fell out were installed by Cardone. One side seemed to be around 35 ft-lb as when I checked them with my torque wrench, I tightened them only slightly more to get to 40. All of the bolts I installed, I did use torque wrenches, I have a 1/4" 20-200 in-lb torque wrench for little fasteners which I used for the banjo bolts. I used the spec from Goodridge on their banjo bolts. I didn't use a torque wrench for the 10 mm flare nuts on the solid brake lines, not sure if hardly anyone goes through the trouble to get a special torque wrench set-up for brake line flare nuts, although in the HVAC business we do see specs for flare nuts on brass fittings and some manufacturers do offer a special tool to torque them.

Plus I was expecting 50 mm pistons and they were smaller.

Lesson on this for me is that Cardone isn't a quality manufacturer. We'll see how the calipers hold up compared to the Raybestos zinc coated front calipers on my Jetta.

OEM might be good quality, but will rust fast in New York state.

As far as babysitting a manufacturer to check they did their job correctly, my Jetta is a good example of why that isn't always possible. A good many of the bolts on that car are single use TTY. They are torqued to a low setting then a spec is provided for a fraction of a turn past that setting. There is no practical way to verify someone else did their job correctly with those bolts.
 

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I don’t post much but I do feel the need to chime in here for safety’s sake (if for no more than posterity).
I wonder if any of you that did the REAR mdx upgrade thought through the emergency brake diameter between the pilot/mdx and the odyssey. Seems like it’s been completely overlooked in this discussion and I would guess 99% of us don’t use it so it wouldn’t be an issue.... until it is.
The shoes appear to fit a different diameter drum in hat but I don’t have the resources to verify. Can anyone spec that and verify? If they are different, I wonder if the shoes and parts kit from the mdx will function in place of their counterparts.
 

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I don’t post much but I do feel the need to chime in here for safety’s sake (if for no more than posterity).
I wonder if any of you that did the REAR mdx upgrade thought through the emergency brake diameter between the pilot/mdx and the odyssey. Seems like it’s been completely overlooked in this discussion and I would guess 99% of us don’t use it so it wouldn’t be an issue.... until it is.
The shoes appear to fit a different diameter drum in hat but I don’t have the resources to verify. Can anyone spec that and verify? If they are different, I wonder if the shoes and parts kit from the mdx will function in place of their counterparts.
I went on Rock Auto and found a couple of spec sheets for each type. Unfortunately, they seem to do what they want and the measurements don't appear to be standardized, so it's hard to make a straight across comparison. These were the only spec sheets for each I could find. It looks like there may be small dimensional differences, but it looks like the ID of the "drum" in the rotor hat is (I'm guessing) the same between the two, based on the 4.090" overall shoe assembly radius on the Odyssey spec (working out to an overall OD of 8.18"), vs. the 8.25" "drum inside diameter" spec listed on the shoes for the Pilot.

It gets a bit muddy for the width, as the "steel width" is listed as 1.380" for the Ody shoes (with a friction lining width of 1.200"), whereas the Pilot spec has the "width" and "brake shoe width" spec both listed at 1.26", although the steel part of the shoe in the pic is clearly a bit wider than the friction material. The only real way would be to put a set of (preferably) new shoes of each type side by side and take measurements with calipers, although the specs they do provide allow for maybe an 0.12" difference at most.

That said, it's hard to tell if the Pilot parts would bolt onto the Ody hubs, since the hole patterns look different and I don't know exactly which ones would be used. My feeling is that the critical dimensions are close enough where you can just run Ody shoes on the Pilot rotors and it won't be a problem, but that's just my guess based on the dimensions I have available to work with.

2005 Odyssey:


2010 Pilot:
 

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That’s as much information as I found. My concern is contact surface area of pad to hat. Even at a few mm different diameter, you’re substantially reducing the “shoe contact patch. So although it may work well enough to stop the van from rolling when removing a front tire, it will NOT work in any emergency situation, ie. loss of brake fluid, et al. Yes, it may eventually wear in to fit, but again, if the lining is 3 mm thick and the difference between diameters of the hats are 2 mm, you’re completely worn through to shoe metal before you ever make contact with the active (wheel cylinder) side of the shoe lining. Depending upon the relationship of the passive (hinge) side, that may not make contact either or more likely be the only place that ever does touch the hat.
I am currently researching rear brake options since my backs are shot (including calipers) but since this is all (brake upgrades in general) in the name of safety, I can’t see the logic in accidentally undermining the effectiveness of the emergency brake system. It would be prudent for someone who has done the rear mdx swap (and users/has used the e-brake) to pull off the rotor and inspected wear to evaluate function.
Thoughts?
 

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I did the upgrade and drove to Mississippi this weekend to visit my daughter. I had a good test of the brakes when someone swerved in front of me to take an exit in Pennsylvania. The biggest drama I had was with the calipers.

I ordered MDX calipers from R1 Concepts, the price was good at $183.60 delivered for a pair. But they cancelled the order and sent my money back as they were unable to fulfill the order.

I emailed RockAuto about sending Odyssey Calipers back on a core credit for purchase of MDX Calipers, and they replied that the calipers returned had to match the ones bought. So I got a pair of Cardone calipers, part #s 19P-3278 and 19P-3279. These are zinc coated for MDX with brackets. Total cost with core charge, tax, and shipping delivered was $303.66. The pistons didn't measure any larger than the old calipers. I did not check the caliper to bracket slide bolt torque, figured they were tightened correctly. My wife called about a clunking sound when she was 10 miles from home last week. Both bolts had fallen out on one side. I went to Autozone and bought a new bolt/glide pin set for $15 and used the bolts. The bolts are M10x1.25 fine thread high strength 9.5. I tightened to 40 ft-lb and checked the other side, they were already tightened to around 35 ft-lb, added a little bit more. Must be the slide pin bolts were not torqued on the one side.

The Goodridge G-Stop 20026 stainless hose set was $133.86 delivered from Amazon. Definitely worth doing just this if nothing else on these cars. Nice product.

Brake pads were Centric and Wagner corrosion resistant rotors. Rockauto again. Pads part # 500.13780 and rotors BD180044E. Total delivered with tax $189.36.

We'll see how everything looks after a couple of New York winters of salt exposure.

I'll sell the oem calipers with rotors and pads. It's nice to have the 330 mm rotors now vs 300, but this upgrade was more of a headache than I had hoped for.
LOL, critical brake parts from autozone. You must enjoy living on the edge! Maybe this is one case where theres only a few sources and theyre the same as everyone elses but autozones replacement parts quality is scary. I only buy fluids there now.
 

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Agreed. But the Ody has weak brakes since the beginning. First few years we wrote it off as its a big vehicle. Then people started posting here and we realized that there is a problem of weak brakes on it. While I am happy with the brakes and the rotors not warping and stock brakes lasting almost 97K, in cases of an emergency stop, it scares the crap out of wife and myself. It has always stopped but a couple of times, very very close and once, I overshot the stop line at a light and ended up in the middle of the intersection.

So, I think its time for the upgrade. I am sure new pads will help. I am sure new tires will help too but the poor performance was there when this set was new.

** Edit **
Also the tire grip will trigger ABS or lockups and slide. That has never happened to us. The current issue is if used to hard, there is definite brake fade. I know that can be cured by new pads and perhaps rotors.
I think I was surprised at how well the ody will stop whe it has to when I did a panic stop about a montjh after buying it. S/B 163 approaching Friars for those familiar with San Diego. Fast downhill freeway into a congested exit. It didnt look like I would avoid the car in front then I stood on the pedal hard and it did. In day to day driving they do feel weak.
 
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