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That’s as much information as I found. My concern is contact surface area of pad to hat. Even at a few mm different diameter, you’re substantially reducing the “shoe contact patch. So although it may work well enough to stop the van from rolling when removing a front tire, it will NOT work in any emergency situation, ie. loss of brake fluid, et al. Yes, it may eventually wear in to fit, but again, if the lining is 3 mm thick and the difference between diameters of the hats are 2 mm, you’re completely worn through to shoe metal before you ever make contact with the active (wheel cylinder) side of the shoe lining. Depending upon the relationship of the passive (hinge) side, that may not make contact either or more likely be the only place that ever does touch the hat.
I am currently researching rear brake options since my backs are shot (including calipers) but since this is all (brake upgrades in general) in the name of safety, I can’t see the logic in accidentally undermining the effectiveness of the emergency brake system. It would be prudent for someone who has done the rear mdx swap (and users/has used the e-brake) to pull off the rotor and inspected wear to evaluate function.
Thoughts?
I thought about this a bit, and then tried looking up technical drawings of the rotors for comparison. Surprisingly, Brembo had a tech drawing on file for the Ody, but none for the Pilot. I still have some NIB Centric rear Pilot rotors here that I haven't had a chance to install yet due to major unexpected life changes (probably will have to be a project for next summer :( ) So, I pulled one of them out, dusted off the digital calipers, and started taking measurements and comparing them to the printed out drawing of the Ody rotor.

Turns out, the rotors are basically identical dimension wise except for the OD of the swept area (the whole reason for upgrading them). Everything else matches (within a small margin of error, say +/-0.3mm, give or take). In total, I verified the thickness of the swept area (11mm), the thickness of the mounting surface (6.2mm) the depth of the hat (43mm), and the total rotor height (63.6mm). The bit of undimensioned space between the inside of the mounting surface and the "ceiling" of the hat works out to 14.4mm per the drawing, and (as you'd expect) this was confirmed with the calipers. The little offset between the innermost lip of the rotor and the back of the swept area is about 3.6mm, for anyone curious. I also confirmed the 210mm ID of the hat; however, I had to use a tape measure for this, since my calipers top out at a little over 6". So, no worries about using Odyssey parking brake hardware on the Pilot / MDX rotors :)

I'm not sure why the shoes are different between the two though. Maybe something to do with packaging, or stopping power requirements based on expected vehicle weight?

 

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Hi guys,

I've recently bought a 2007 Odyssey Touring and as I couldn't get used to its terrible brakes and having in mind I will be driving around my family, the Pilot brake swap has become a necessity for us. The problem is that I'm from Bulgaria and I don't have an easy access to the US/Canada auto wreck shops and no one on Ebay/Amazon is offering shipment to Bulgaria for the OEM parts from Joe422's list. I have found that rockauto.com would ship to Bulgaria and I was wondering could you suggest what items should I purchase from them to perform the swap because unfortunately at rockauto they don't offer the OEM ones either but rather a bunch of aftermarket options. Here's a list of all the items I think will do the trick but is there someone to confirm I'm right or suggest something else?

2010 Honda Pilot:
1. AKEBONO ACT1280 pads
2. CENTRIC 14140108 front left caliper
3. CENTRIC 14140107 front right caliper
4. WAGNER BD180044E front rotors

I'm not sure if the calipers on rockauto come with carriers as per Joe's instructions. I already have the crush washers for the banjo bolts and the Ate DOT4 brake fluid.

Thank you in advance for all the help!
 

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Discussion Starter #245
Hi guys,

I've recently bought a 2007 Odyssey Touring and as I couldn't get used to its terrible brakes and having in mind I will be driving around my family, the Pilot brake swap has become a necessity for us. The problem is that I'm from Bulgaria and I don't have an easy access to the US/Canada auto wreck shops and no one on Ebay/Amazon is offering shipment to Bulgaria for the OEM parts from Joe422's list. I have found that rockauto.com would ship to Bulgaria and I was wondering could you suggest what items should I purchase from them to perform the swap because unfortunately at rockauto they don't offer the OEM ones either but rather a bunch of aftermarket options. Here's a list of all the items I think will do the trick but is there someone to confirm I'm right or suggest something else?

2010 Honda Pilot:
1. AKEBONO ACT1280 pads
2. CENTRIC 14140108 front left caliper
3. CENTRIC 14140107 front right caliper
4. WAGNER BD180044E front rotors

I'm not sure if the calipers on rockauto come with carriers as per Joe's instructions. I already have the crush washers for the banjo bolts and the Ate DOT4 brake fluid.

Thank you in advance for all the help!

Hi.. wow.. its nice to see people are utilizing the swap/upgrades that are easily done on the Ody~
Your choices in caliper and rotors should be fine... however I'd personally recommend staying away from Ceramic type brake pads.

Ceramic pads are quieter (but any pads installed correctly should be quiet as well, besides race pads).
They also help keep your wheels looking cleaner longer, and supposedly last longer... however braking power is less than semi-metallic type pads. Ceramic pads have a softer bite, and often feels like the brake system needs to be bled again (like air in the brake lines).

Being that youre wanting to upgrade your brakes for better/stronger/safer braking... you're handicapping yourself by using ceramic pads. I know its hard to find for you, but Genuine Honda pads have worked well, and if you want better than that... then EBC Yellow, or HAWK HPS pads should be much better in braking than any ceramic pads. They will cost a little bit more, but stopping a 2000kg vehicle with your family in it deserves some investment... right?

Anyway, good luck with your pursuit... and hope you enjoy the Ody!
 

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Thanks for your quick and detailed reply, Joe!
After reading your post I must say that I agree with your suggestion on the pads because I am really looking for the best performers overall. Luckily for me, after I posted here, I've managed to find a Bulgarian dealer that could deliver all the OEM stuff from your list so I now may have a pair of genuine Honda pads for $122
He also offered me brand new OEM calipers but the price is a bit bitter
- $560 each so I will stick to the Centrics. They should be equipped with the corresponding carriers, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #247
Nice... Yes, the new calipers should come with the proper carriers for the conversion. Getting genuine Honda pads is a good move, because they come with the proper hardware, shims, wire springs, etc. Next time you change pads, you can reuse these little hardware, but at least you will have them now. Good luck!~
 

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Nice... Yes, the new calipers should come with the proper carriers for the conversion. Getting genuine Honda pads is a good move, because they come with the proper hardware, shims, wire springs, etc. Next time you change pads, you can reuse these little hardware, but at least you will have them now. Good luck!~
Thank you big time for your help!
I will post a feedback after the job is done.
Regards and cheers!
 

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By the way, I completely forgot that soon after I purchased the van and encountered its poor breaking I firstly purchased a set of Goodridge SS brake lines. They're still sitting in the box because I've been reading of some failure reports (for the likes and not a single one for the Goodridge brand) and also inability to make proper visual inspections compared to the genuine lines. I've also been told by my mechanic that it is best to stick to the OEMs and that mine are still looking fine.
What are your thoughts and experiences on the matter? Is it safe, reliable and worth converting my rubber to those SS lines? Thanks

p.s. here's a video that made me have second thoughts about it:

 

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Look, that dude does not and can’t turn a wrench and he is doing a video on SS brake lines. You need to get true facts from techs, racers, etc.

I am using SS lines with great results.

Just installing front SS brake lines is better than the whole pilot BBK on the 3rd gen. YMMV
 

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Thanks for the reply. I see your point and it sounds really tempting but apart from performance what about longevity and serviceability? How long a properly installed set of ss lines could last... roughly?
 

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Thanks for the reply. I see your point and it sounds really tempting but apart from performance what about longevity and serviceability? How long a properly installed set of ss lines could last... roughly?
Long as normal brake hoses last.
Key is to install them properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #253
SS brake lines need to be handled with care, and installed properly. They will not expand like rubber does, but the teflon hose liner can get damaged, and so can the SS braiding... but many modern SS brake hoses have a protective vinyl layer on top too. That being said, never kink, stretch, pull, or twist a SS hose. It should last the life of the car if cared for. Be especially careful when pulling the calipers off to change the rotors. Never let the calipers hang on a SS line.

Whenever I open up any brake system, I always change to SS lines on all my cars.
 

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I hope it's not going to be a tricky job for an experienced mechanic like mine.
I've read on this thread that the Pilot swap is nearly a bolt on operation but could this also be said about the SS lines? Am I going to be able to use the 3rd gen Goodridge ss lines I have on the new front setup or just on the untouched rears?
It's the same process as replacing OE hoses. You just need to make sure the line isn't twisted. Loosely install the brake hose bracket and have someone turn the wheel full left and right and make sure it doesn't get stressed. Then tighten the bracket down.
 
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