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Discussion Starter #1
My Odyssey 2001 with 183,000 KM needs the front brake pads to be changed. Could some one let me know whether I should change the rotors too ?
I was told by someone to get that changed while changing the pads. I read the service manual and there is no mention of rotors for front wheels.
Please guide me
Thanks
 

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It depends- are yours the original rotors? If so, they probably need to be changed. If not original, it depends on what condition they are in and what thickness remains. Personally, I change the rotors about every other pad change. Some change pads and rotors every time.
 

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Agreed. The rule of thumb is that when you change rotors you should definitely change pads. The converse - changing rotors when pads are worn - only is necessary when the rotors are worn, deeply grooved, or otherwise out of spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the replies.

I have never changed the brakes. AS such this is going to be the first time.
I checked the price of a rotor and they say its 123 + taxes each, its a lot of money so I am wondering whether I should skip it this time.
Thanks
 

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Is that a dealer price? Seems pretty high. Check online and through this site's search feature and I'm sure you'll blow away that price. I've only been on this forum a couple weeks but I've seen prices quite a bit lower than that - there should be some brake threads on the first couple pages here that'll give you some leads.
 

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So 115k miles-ish? Sorry, some of us still think in miles ;) As mentioned, look at the rotors and check for grooves and measure the thickness. If all good then go for just the pads and see how it brakes. Seeing you are not in the US your prices are most likely higher than what we can get them for here. If changing, I would only go OEM seeing they last so long. Check out the US prices on Bernardi Honda or Majestic Honda's websites.
 

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Bell2810,

I posted this on another Honda forum (CR-V) but it is applicable to your question. Give it a read and see what you think.

On a scale of one to ten the difficulty of replacing your brake pads (front) in my opinion is a 3-4 for someone with the tools and some mechanical ability. It might even be a 2 for some who have that natural ability to fix and tinker. But let me start by saying a couple of things. First, always consult a good service manual. I would never suggest that someone who has never done brake work before fly blind. Second and I can't over state this, work with someone who would be willing to show you what to do the first time. Remember what you are talking about, brakes, they are not complicated in any sense, but they NEED to work. Now with that all said, you will need to determine the extent of the job. Many will tell you to resurface the rotors, some will tell you not to bother. What I do is first look at their condition, for example are there are any deep groves / scores, if there is brake peddle pulsing on a fairly hard slow down (say on the highway, 70 down to 40 mph), any vibration(s), any pull when braking, for me these all come into play. If I have these issues then I'm more likely to replace the rotors (hardly pays to get them cut / resurfaced). But when I have none of those symptoms I just replace the pads. Now once you have figured what you are going to do (with the rotors) you need to decide what you are going to use for brake pads, with the odyssey, the factory Honda pads come with both shims and clips. Using parts house pads you will most likely get nothing other than the pads. To get the new pads into place you need to be able to push the caliper piston back, I use a large C clamp. The Caliper "floats" on the caliper mount and "pins", sometimes I'll push the piston back with everything in place other times I'll push the piston back with a pad against the piston with the caliper in the "open" position. For me it mostly depends on the vehicle and the size of my C clamp. Again, here is where having someone to show you what to do helps. Most manuals will only tell you to push the caliper piston back.... Also note, if you have kept the brake fluid level up while the pads have worn down then you will need to remove some fluid from the master cylinder or else it will spill out as you push the piston(s) back, displacing the fluid that has been taken up due to the pad material loss. The caliper is held to the caliper mount using two "pins", removal of one pin allows for the caliper to pivot up on the other (the pin is a bolt that threads into the pin assembly). Well I've gotten into it fairly deeply and you can see that it is not that complicated, but I think I'll leave off here. So at this point, the vehicle should be safely supported (I can not stress this enough), front wheels removed (rim / tire). Again, a good service manual coupled with a good friend who knows what they are doing would come in handy here. If what I have said makes you uneasy or you have doubts well ..... Lots of luck in what ever you decide. Russ
 

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That's an excellent write-up by reberman999.

I was a bit intimidated the first time I changed my brakes and rotors, but it really is an easy job. You only need a socket wrench to remove the brake calipers as well as a C-clamp for pressing the caliper piston. I usually use the old pad for pressing the caliper back.

One last thing to add if you plan on replacing the rotors. If they are still the original rotors installed from the factory, then they are probably screwed onto the hub by a short philips head screw. You will need an impact wrench to remove this screw. On the other hand, if the rotors aren't screwed onto the hub, then they can be easily removed by hitting with a block of wood. No need to screw the new rotors onto the hub.
 
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