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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am sure that this question has been asked before, but I couldn't find a thread.

I know that I need a new serpentine belt tensioner for my 2007 Honda Odyssey EX-L (it's the one with cylinder deactivation). After looking at Amazon reviews as well as recommendations from this forum, it looks like I should get an OEM (if there is a less expense 3rd party alternative, please make a recommendation.)

With that said, the only issue that I have is that one of the pulleys is wobbly (circled in red below). Does anyone know if that pulley can be replaced by itself without having to purchase the whole assembly? If so, where could I buy one? The van has 135K, so it probably could use the whole new assembly, but I am not sure how long I will keep the van. Thank you.

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They don't sell that particular pulley by itself, but it can be replaced if you have proper tools and another pulley.
or
you could just buy a used but cheap tensioner from ebay
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They don't sell that particular pulley by itself, but it can be replaced if you have proper tools and another pulley.
or
you could just buy a used but cheap tensioner from ebay
Do you know what the spec is on the pulley in question? Has anyone in this forum successfully just replace the pulley?
 

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I replaced this specific pulley but on my other car which is a Civic. I used a Dayco pulley and is doing just fine (previously had a whining noise on heavy load).
 

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Using @FD7683 's link, I took a look at some of the offerings.

The last two look promising. The Continental pulley appears to use an NSK bearing. That's good.

The Gates pulley uses an NTN bearing. That's good, too.

Essentially, if it has a bearing made by Trinton, NTN, Nachi, NSK, SKF, INA, IKO or Koyo ... those are reputable names. So is F.A.G. (I have to use period punctuation marks, or the F.A.G. name [German bearing mfgr] gets hacked by "anti-hate software").

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I am sure that this question has been asked before, but I couldn't find a thread.

I know that I need a new serpentine belt tensioner for my 2007 Honda Odyssey EX-L (it's the one with cylinder deactivation). After looking at Amazon reviews as well as recommendations from this forum, it looks like I should get an OEM (if there is a less expense 3rd party alternative, please make a recommendation.)

With that said, the only issue that I have is that one of the pulleys is wobbly (circled in red below). Does anyone know if that pulley can be replaced by itself without having to purchase the whole assembly? If so, where could I buy one? The van has 135K, so it probably could use the whole new assembly, but I am not sure how long I will keep the van. Thank you.

View attachment 166223
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I can’t fathom why your would ever think to do this.
Just replace the entire tensioner.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There is a BUNCH of idler pulleys you can use from Rockauto. Not sure on the torque spec though.
Thanks for the input. My concern is that the belt tensioner between LX/EX (no cylinder deactivation) and EX-L/Touring (with cylinder deactivation) is different. All the idler pulleys sold by Rockauto appear to be for LX/EX. I am not sure if there are any differences between LX/EX and EX-L/Touring?

Also, is this reverse threaded?
 

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Thanks for the input. My concern is that the belt tensioner between LX/EX (no cylinder deactivation) and EX-L/Touring (with cylinder deactivation) is different. All the idler pulleys sold by Rockauto appear to be for LX/EX. I am not sure if there are any differences between LX/EX and EX-L/Touring?

Also, is this reverse threaded?
Yes, the tensioner is different. I believe the VCM engines have a hydraulic tensioner while the non-VCMs have a mechanical one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, the tensioner is different. I believe the VCM engines have a hydraulic tensioner while the non-VCMs have a mechanical one.
Right, I should've been clearer in my questioning. Given that the belt tensioners are different between non-VCM (LX/EX) and VCM (EX-L/Touring) engines, does anyone know if the idler pulley is different between non-VCM and VCM? I ask b/c the ones that are sold by Rockauto are for non-VCM.

I also noticed that the bolt for the idler pulley on VCM is torx whereas it's a regular hex for non-VCM. While this difference doesn't bother me, the idler pulley on VCM is "bolted" directly on the tensioner assembly, which is relatively thin. So I am not confident that the idler pulley is actually bolted on for the VCM engine. There doesn't seem to be enough "depth" (b/c the plate on the assembly is thin) for the bolt to be bolted on securely.

I am beginning to think that I need to just buy the whole assembly...
 

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See how worn your tensioner is if it helps you decide. Yes the tensioners are different. I replaced my entire tensioner when my tensioner pulley went without inspecting by the logic that if the pulley is tired then so is the tensioner. I didn't want to let it be another problem for another day.
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Alright, to follow up on this...

I ended up purchasing the Honda OEM tensioner and the belt and replaced them today. I am a curious person, so naturally, I took apart the old part and here is what I have found.

1) The tensioner pulley is held on by T50.
2) It's NOT reverse threaded.
3) Looking at the pulley, it looks to be replaceable (which was what I was hoping to do. The hydraulic on my old tensioner was still quite good.)
4) The tensioner pulley and the idler pulley are NOT the same parts. The tensioner pulley has a recessed center.

One of these days, I am going to take the old pulley to a local auto parts store and see if there is a direct replacement. That will satisfy my curiosity, but for now, the job is done and I have a peace of mind knowing that I won't have to mess with the tensioner and the belt for another 100K.

Thanks everyone.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Do you think you could just replace the bearing?
Yes, totally. I don't have the tools at home to press it out, but I am sure that it can be done. When I stop by the local auto parts store, I will rent out the tool and see if I can press it out in the parking lot.
 

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Look for numbers on the bearings themselves. Then plug those numbers into your fave search engine. Many bearings used are industry standard, not custom made for the application. I can read some numbers in the pic, but the rust/grease is obscuring most.
 

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See how worn your tensioner is if it helps you decide. Yes the tensioners are different. I replaced my entire tensioner when my tensioner pulley went without inspecting by the logic that if the pulley is tired then so is the tensioner. I didn't want to let it be another problem for another day.
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Hi,

When we had our timing belt, timing belt tensioner and water pump changed, we also had the serpentine tensioner replaced (part cost only) because I broke off the dummy bolt on top. At that time, I did mention about bleeding the tensioner to the service advisor and he said that he had not heard about it and that they warranty the work for a year.

Do most Honda dealerships knows and follow the instruction to bleed the serpentine tensioner? The repair was completed over two years and 14K miles ago. Am I good with the repair or should I still be concern about the potential for the bolt to break?

Thanks,
 

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Most "service advisors" (i.e., service salespeople) know as much about repairs as grocery store clerks know about growing wheat or raising beef cattle.
 

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You can just replace the bearings, I have done this using Japanese Nachi bearings. To get the bearing out, just use a socket on the old bearing + a hammer to get it out, to get it in, use a socket covering the outer diameter of the bearing and use a vice to press it in.
 
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