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Discussion Starter #1
In my last car, my child seats did a number on the leather with nasty looking dents where the car seats rested. Anyone have a suggestion on how to prevent this?

I've seen Babies R Us, Buy Buy Baby, etc. all sell covers/protectors for seats for use with car seats. I also know Honda sells a 2nd row and 3rd row cover for the seats on my 2011 EX-L.

Opinions? I'm trying to decide what to get....I'm mostly worried about protecting the leather.
 

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We used to put a folded towel under the car seat so it better distributed the contact point. Might be cheaper than a cover.
 

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I went with the Honda seat covers for the 2nd and 3rd row. They fit great, look alright overall etc. Couple of downsides though as an adult sitting on them, they are slippery and don't breath at all.
 

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Here are other worthless threads on the subject. I call 'em worthless as they aren't for the "special" 2011 model.

Found 'em using the search term: car seat protection in google search uptop.

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/20-kids-safety/3277-protecting-ody-seat-under-carseat-booster.html
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/20-kids-safety/29787-booster-seat-leather.html
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/20-kids-safety/9052-car-seat-new-leather-seat.html
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/20-kids-safety/12850-kids-leather-seats.html

And finally, if you're concerned about discoloration on using said protectors.

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/20-kids-safety/44194-seat-protectors-discoloration.html
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I use the Sunshine Kids Ultra Mat.

Amazon.com: Sunshine Kids Ultra Mat - Gray: Baby


They also have a Super Mat that only includes the bottom half.

http://www.amazon.com/Sunshine-Kids-10500-Super-Mat/dp/B00006JK3R


I use it in the second row center seat and I have had an infant car seat and now a convertible car seat on it and it works well.

;)
Prevents dents ok? I've read some reviews of some protectors that fuse to the leather with some heat. That is a concern of course.
 

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Prevents dents ok? I've read some reviews of some protectors that fuse to the leather with some heat. That is a concern of course.
It worked well with the infant car seat (base and separate removable seat). I just installed a much heavier Britax Advocate convertible car seat a few weeks ago. I haven't looked under the Ultra Mat since I installed the new seat, so I'm not sure how my seat is holding up.

Read the reviews on Amazon and Wal-mart. Both products seem to get a lot of 5 star reviews.

;)
 

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As a car seat tech, I will say that most aftermarket mats are not a good idea. Your best bet is a thin towel to protect the bottom of the seat. We don't use anything in our car. I find the dents come out after a little while and we try not to eat too much in the car so we don't get stains.

If you read your car seat manual you will see that it says not to add any aftermarket items to your seats which would include the protective mats.
 

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As a car seat tech, I will say that most aftermarket mats are not a good idea. Your best bet is a thin towel to protect the bottom of the seat. We don't use anything in our car. I find the dents come out after a little while and we try not to eat too much in the car so we don't get stains.

If you read your car seat manual you will see that it says not to add any aftermarket items to your seats which would include the protective mats.

forgive my ignorance here, but how does a solid object that is captured between two other solid objects create problems with car seat installation?

also, how does a thin piece of neoprene, rubber, latex or other fabric/plastic combo differ in any way shape or form from a 'thin' towel?

:huh:
 

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forgive my ignorance here, but how does a solid object that is captured between two other solid objects create problems with car seat installation?

also, how does a thin piece of neoprene, rubber, latex or other fabric/plastic combo differ in any way shape or form from a 'thin' towel?

:huh:
First, many aftermarket mats are quite thick. Some have ridges on one side and some soft fabric against the vehicle seat on the other. These type of mat is quite thick and leaves extra gaps in the installation.

Materials like neoprene and rubber etc can lead to a false sense of tightness. They can grip the car and the vehicle seat and make it seem as though they are installed tightly. Sometimes the seat can actually be moved inches where the mat made it seem like it was tight. In a crash, it may turn out that the seats were not tight enough. Some may are better than others... but some are really terrible at affecting a car seat install. You really need to make that determination on your own. Since a towel is known to be just fine and is accordance with the manuals, that is what is recommended. If the mat is really as thin as a towel and doesn't have rubber or plastic etc... then why buy something extra... just use a towel;).
 

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First, many aftermarket mats are quite thick. Some have ridges on one side and some soft fabric against the vehicle seat on the other. These type of mat is quite thick and leaves extra gaps in the installation.

Materials like neoprene and rubber etc can lead to a false sense of tightness. They can grip the car and the vehicle seat and make it seem as though they are installed tightly. Sometimes the seat can actually be moved inches where the mat made it seem like it was tight. In a crash, it may turn out that the seats were not tight enough. Some may are better than others... but some are really terrible at affecting a car seat install. You really need to make that determination on your own. Since a towel is known to be just fine and is accordance with the manuals, that is what is recommended. If the mat is really as thin as a towel and doesn't have rubber or plastic etc... then why buy something extra... just use a towel;).
I think a towel can suffer the same problems you are describing. What the manuals say about a towel is that if your car seat is not level then roll up a towel to put under the part of the base that is not level. For this I use those pool noodles cut to size and taped up with some duct tape. My friend is in law enforcement and has had to take classes on setting up car seats for people who want them to install them for them and this is what they do.

As for putting something underneath the entire base of the car seat there is nothing in any of the manuals that talks about this. Bottom line is most cars need something under the thick part of the base, so a rolled up towel or noodle is what is used and that is where the pressure is. This is of course for rear facing, I have not got to the point of forward facing yet. For all I know when using forward facing the rolled up towel or noodle may not be needed.
 

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I think a towel can suffer the same problems you are describing. What the manuals say about a towel is that if your car seat is not level then roll up a towel to put under the part of the base that is not level. For this I use those pool noodles cut to size and taped up with some duct tape. My friend is in law enforcement and has had to take classes on setting up car seats for people who want them to install them for them and this is what they do.

As for putting something underneath the entire base of the car seat there is nothing in any of the manuals that talks about this. Bottom line is most cars need something under the thick part of the base, so a rolled up towel or noodle is what is used and that is where the pressure is. This is of course for rear facing, I have not got to the point of forward facing yet. For all I know when using forward facing the rolled up towel or noodle may not be needed.
I took the same class as a law enforcement individual. I actually have a car seat installation education business. You are incorrect when you say that I am am thinking of a rolled towel for recline. In the actual tech curriculum there is a portion about using a thin towel to protect your car seat. One can also use pool noodles if your vehicle seat and car seat combined do not achieve an appropriate recline. This is often only necessary for the newborn phase. An older child can usually handle less of a recline. Of course you have to check your car seat manual because some seats must always be installed at a 45 degree angle.

You are incorrect that the manual says nothing about adding mats, or different harness covers... If you read your manual, you will see it says not to add anything aftermarket to the seat. This warning includes mats. You can choose to disagree but this is exactly what we are taught when we train to be techs. Go back and check your manual or let me know what seat you have and I can find the wording for you.

Not all cars need something for recline and many seats now come with recline modes that suffice without noodles. I have installed seats for some with noodles but haven't needed them for my cars and seats. The Ody has hardly any slope and I have achieved plenty of recline without noodles in my car.
 
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