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Discussion Starter #1
First time, I'm trying to change my rear brake rotors and pads.
According to shop manual, there's a bolt to loosen and flip up the caliper, but I notice it's really rusted. However, the two caliper mounting bolts are "like new". Is there a trick that you just remove the entire caliper (like you're going to change the rotor) which allows you to change the pads?

I guess I'm asking, just remove two caliper bolts and forget about the lower slider bolt?

quick answer requested :D cause .....
 

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Discussion Starter #2
OK, realized you do have to remove bolt to flip up caliper so that you can get pads out.

However, I've realized that the "brake inspection" my dealer has done involved only removing the caliper mounting bolts and brake spray on the rotor.

Also good news, the pads had about 5mm of pad left and rotor thickness was 10.5 mm. So IMHO the dealer lied about needing immediate brake service before performing the latest brake recall fix.
 

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wildpack said:
OK, realized you do have to remove bolt to flip up caliper so that you can get pads out.

However, I've realized that the "brake inspection" my dealer has done involved only removing the caliper mounting bolts and brake spray on the rotor.

Also good news, the pads had about 5mm of pad left and rotor thickness was 10.5 mm. So IMHO the dealer lied about needing immediate brake service before performing the latest brake recall fix.
amazing what we find out the dealer "lied" about when we figure things out ourselves :D

a service advisor at the dealer i used to go to used to tell me some crazy things. imagine how many people get screwed?
 

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Brakes are a very-high-profit item for dealers, for several reasons...


The parts are relatively cheap, but not so cheap that they can't tack on a good profit.
The skills to replace all the parts are trivial. Even a highschooler can do it.
The time taken to replace the parts is not much, but you don't need to tell the customer that.
People tend to get alarmed when you tell them their brakes are worn out, and that panic gets them to make stupid decisions.


All these combine to make a GIANT reason for the dealer to tell you your brakes are in need of replacement.
 

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Richie_Richie said:
amazing what we find out the dealer "lied" about when we figure things out ourselves :D
My dealer told my wife that she needed new brakes more than a year ago. I'm doing them this week, 15,000 miles later.
There ought to be a law....
 

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easyrider13 said:
My dealer told my wife that she needed new brakes more than a year ago. I'm doing them this week, 15,000 miles later.
There ought to be a law....
mine told me once that the reason the rear brakes on my cr-v were worn out was because of a new technology honda had implemented to stop the car from tipping forward during a hard stop. this would put more strain on the rear pads. apparently my cr-v was the only one on the planet that had the technology :eek:

what really happened was the tech didn't lube the slider pins during the brake service. lazy a$$e$
 

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It isn't uncommon for rear brakes to wear faster than front brakes, but not because of anti-forward-rollover technology :)

The rear brakes do less work, and as a result are frequently made smaller and the pads are made of a different material. These factors combine into rear brakes that wear faster than the fronts.

As an added bonus, by making the brake wear not uniform from front to back, the manufacturer has essentially thrown a bone to the dealer. He has twice the opportunity to utter the phrase "[front or rear] brakes are worn out, we should do the other axle at the same time", even though the other axle is still fine.
 

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SuperDad said:
It isn't uncommon for rear brakes to wear faster than front brakes, but not because of anti-forward-rollover technology :)
agreed. but it was too funny. 1 month earlier crv was serviced and they listed front and rear brakes at 70% (can't remember the mm measurement). when the rear pads wore away fronts were still at 70%. the right rear caliper slider was stuck because they didn't lube it.

sorry for OT posts but some of the crap dealers try and pull is amazing.
 

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If you really want to know, you probably CAN change the pads without removing the small caliper sliding bolts.

You'd pull the bolts that mount the caliper bracket to the steering knuckle, then pull the bracket and caliper off as a unit. Knock both pads toward where the rotor used to be, and insert new ones.

Note: To do this, you probably ougtta use a C clamp or something to push the pistons back before disassembly.
 
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