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My wife hates that expression: rocket science.

Our 2000 Odyssey is due for the 105k mile service, a part of which is to replace the spark plugs. A Honda dealer wants to charge $230 for that portion of the service package. Aren't OEM plugs about $20 each? So 6 plugs is about $120. It's should be an easy DIY task, right? Am I missing something?

p.s. Where can I find the correct torque to apply to the plugs?

Thanks.
 

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I changed the plugs in our '01. Not too hard. If memory serves you remove the plastic cover and that gives access to each coil pack / plug. the ones in the back were a bit harder due to access, but with various socket extensions, none were impossible. Regarding the torque - don't have the value off hand. Maybe there is a post in the maintenance section with that. I know it wasn't very much.
 

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Buy them on line e.g. from Amazon and you will be paying less than $10 each. The torque is usually around 15 ft-lb. Generally, you follow the direction on the package where it tells you to tighten 1/4 turn after it sits. Don't use big ratchet and try to put your hand near the pivot point so that you will not apply too much torque.

And definitely use the OEM plugs either Laser Platinum or Laser Iridium made by NGK or Denso.
 

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Heh, this was an easy decision to make. After looking over the posts, opening the hood and TRYING to locate the spark plugs (I could only feel the rear coil assembies), I was pretty much convinced to have the dealer change them. Since they have been installed since I bought the van 90K and 9 years ago, the chances of them being hard to remove is very high. SO Dealer it is! I will post what the cost was...
 

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Heh, this was an easy decision to make. After looking over the posts, opening the hood and TRYING to locate the spark plugs (I could only feel the rear coil assemblies), I was pretty much convinced to have the dealer change them. Since they have been installed since I bought the van 90K and 9 years ago, the chances of them being hard to remove is very high. SO Dealer it is! I will post what the cost was...
 

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Heh, this was an easy decision to make. After looking over the posts, opening the hood and TRYING to locate the spark plugs (I could only feel the rear coil assemblies), I was pretty much convinced to have the dealer change them. Since they have been installed since I bought the van 90K and 9 years ago, the chances of them being hard to remove is very high. SO Dealer it is! I will post what the cost was...
$260 before taxes at the dealer. They are using Honda platinum spark plugs.
 

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Let me assure you that honda does not own a spark plug factory. the sales wing of honda rebadges some manufactures plugs that are close to spec and most importantly cheap!.
 

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Rocket Science? More like remedial HS auto shop class level work. Ever had a look at the average dealer auto tech? Are you really intimidated that they are capable of things you aren't? ;)
 

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Apparently it's not common knowledge, but spark plugs need to be changed when the engine is COLD. My co-worker had a good laugh at me when I told him my troubles getting the plugs to come out in a Miata when I just drove home from Pepboys with the plugs. The threads risk crossing when the engine block is hot due to metal expansion. Once the engine cooled down, the plugs came out no problem.
 

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I just changed the plugs on my 05. used laser iridium from NGK, which is what was in there from the fatory. $60 incl shipping from Rock Auto, and exactly 60 Minutes time from hood open to hood closed. I used a 3/8 ratchet with a 4 in. extention, and a universal/swivel. Spark plugs take a 5/8 spark plug socket. ...and yes, best to do it with the engine cold. :)
 

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Can't be harder than a damn Chrysler Voyager. I hate doing tune-up's on those.

Of course it ain't as easy as my BMW either... a 20 minute job easy.
 

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I am on a budget and want to do a tune up. Is it neccassary to replace the coil packs or can I just do the spark plugs? And is NGK the only ones recomended?
 

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No need to replace the coil packs if they are working okay.

However, NGK Iridium is the best plug for this engine. They are available online for a good price compared with over-the-counter.
 

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I finally replaced the plugs on my 2006 Odyssey at 117,000 miles. I replaced them with new NGK plugs, purchased from Amazon for a little under $10 apiece. I won't say it was a quick job because it was a learning experience. But here's what I learned:

1. Use the GearWrench 80546 swivel head spark plug socket with magnetic grip. This tool is awesome and it fit back behind the engine for the rear plugs with no problem.
2. For the back plugs, use a hand mirror to see what you are doing. Makes a huge difference.
3. There is just no space to use a torque wrench on the back plugs, so don't waste two hours trying to fit it back there, or trying to find a smaller torque wrench. Just tighten them by feel and/or by amount of turn.
4. Old plugs came out very easily from the cold engine, even after 117k miles.
5. Old plugs looked basically fine. Very clean and same gap as the new ones. Looked a little weathered but otherwise no different from the new ones.
6. The only real hassle, aside from figuring out how to torque the back plugs, was that the electrical connectors on two of the back 3 plugs were very difficult to remove from the coil. The connector tab gets stiff or something. Scraped some skin off my knuckles trying to pull those things off.

Okay so I won't say how long it took to do the whole job ... I'll just say that by the time I got to the sixth plug (drivers side rear), that last one only took about 5 minutes!
 

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Good on you, and great first post. That GearWrench 80546 sounds like the bomb:



Did that one seem to be the right length for the job? Would a shorter one allow the use of a torque wrench?

Welcome to the forums! :cool:

OF
 

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Good on you, and great first post. That GearWrench 80546 sounds like the bomb:

Did that one seem to be the right length for the job? Would a shorter one allow the use of a torque wrench?

Welcome to the forums! :cool:

OF
Thanks! Great forum.

The GearWrench 80546 is actually a little on the short side, which is not a bad thing because there's so little working space with the back plugs. When the plug is threaded in place, just the tip of the GearWrench socket extends out of the coil's hole, just enough that you can grip it with your fingertips for hand tightening. To put a wrench on the socket and be able to turn it, I needed to add a short 3/8" extension onto the GearWrench.

Some people have said that they used a small torque wrench on the back plugs ... but I got the smallest one I could find and it still doesn't come close to fitting in that space. If someone knows a part number I'd be interested.
 

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6. The only real hassle, aside from figuring out how to torque the back plugs, was that the electrical connectors on two of the back 3 plugs were very difficult to remove from the coil. The connector tab gets stiff or something. Scraped some skin off my knuckles trying to pull those things off.
Tip - If you take the acorn nut off first and slide the coil out ever so slightly you get way better access to the connection and don't chance a break pulling it off.

I just got under my hood again and got cylinder one out with a 10mm ratcheting box wrench and a 3/8 drive socket wrench with extension on a spark plug socket with a rubber catch in the top.

The 10mm box wrench gets at the little acorn nuts holding the coils on, they shouldn't be too tight, if so get a 16 point 10mm deep socket and use the 3/8 socket wrench. Be careful putting them back on, over tighten and you can strip those little nuts fast.

If you need to gain room while removing the plugs, take the socket wrench off the extension, slide extension and plug socket into tube and place wrench on after.
 
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