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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone so when I first got the van I wanted to clean out the TB (I'm OCD about it) and found out that the motorized TB plate can't be moved when its off.

I asked here and checked youtube and everyone said, you have to remove it to clean it.

Well, not to be deterred, I figured out that if you put the ignition to 'on' (but don't start it), then either get a helper to put their foot on the gas pedal OR use a brick, that will open up the throttle body.

I then proceeded to hose out the entire throttle body with my cleaner. I gently wiped the back of the throttle plate too.

Everything is squeaky clean now! Was amazed at the amount of black 'crud' that ran out of it.

I also took the opportunity to liberally spray the intake with sea foam to clean out any remaining carbon that might be in there.

Sorry, didn't take any pics but honestly it's pretty straightforward!
 

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If you're OCD about that, you don't want to take apart the intake manifold above the spacer that connects to the cylinder heads. You wouldn't believe how much oil and crud from the PCV system ends up in there, as well as stuff from the EGR system.

About to do this again, this time on our 2003. EGR and manifold cleanup seems to be one of those items that should be on a 50,000-mile interval in the owner's manual, but I just do it at the timing belt change interval.

Pretty much every Honda or Acura V6 since the late 1990's has to deal with the bugbear of PCV and EGR grime for the intake tract about a foot downstream from the TB.

OF
 

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I then proceeded to hose out the entire throttle body with my cleaner.
I also took the opportunity to liberally spray the intake with sea foam
That may not have been a good idea. My Honda Service Manual states on page 11-372:

Remove the throttle body to clean it.
Do not clean the bearing area around the throttle shaft or you will remove the molybdenum coating.
Do not spray carburetor cleaner directly on the throttle body.
Use only genuine Honda Carburetor Cleaner.

I'd argue that you don't really need to remove it or use genuine Honda CC, but as for 'hosing out the entire throttle body,' that may not have been a great idea. Time will tell I guess. Keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I used a generic throttle body cleaner (vs a carb cleaner) as its supposed to be 'safe' on the newer electronic throttle bodies. I have done it numerous times on my other two cars (which admittedly did not have electronic throttle bodies) and never had any issues.

It's interesting that the Honda service manuals says that - but is it for the older Odyssey?

I find it funny that there were a few comments in another thread that discouraged me from cleaning it. But I did it anyways - and drove it for 1.5 hours on the highway today with no issues. Mind you, it's just the first day. I don't even think I did a 'good' job of cleaning it.

Unless someone can prove to me that its detrimental to do so, I'm going to do it again when I do my oil change.
 

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Yes, that is from my 2005 service manual.

I doubt that you'll have any problems but as expensive as those damn things are I think that caution is wise. Maybe someone with a service manual for a 4th gen can chime in on what theirs says.

I'm planning on cleaning mine for the first time in the next week or so. I'm not taking it off and per the manual I'm just going to wipe it out with a cloth soaked with CC. It's the original and with the high mileage I don't want to take any chances on removing any of the remaining lube amongst the bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wouldn't worry too much about the lube to be honest. Most cleaners will also lube moving parts (at least the ones I use say they do). Worst case, you could squirt a small amount of graphite lube / or similar lube on the pivot points to lube the bearings after cleaning.
 

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Hey everyone so when I first got the van I wanted to clean out the TB (I'm OCD about it) and found out that the motorized TB plate can't be moved when its off.

I asked here and checked youtube and everyone said, you have to remove it to clean it.

Well, not to be deterred, I figured out that if you put the ignition to 'on' (but don't start it), then either get a helper to put their foot on the gas pedal OR use a brick, that will open up the throttle body.

I then proceeded to hose out the entire throttle body with my cleaner. I gently wiped the back of the throttle plate too.

Everything is squeaky clean now! Was amazed at the amount of black 'crud' that ran out of it.

I also took the opportunity to liberally spray the intake with sea foam to clean out any remaining carbon that might be in there.

Sorry, didn't take any pics but honestly it's pretty straightforward!
Cleaning Throttle Body is on my to do list this weekend. I did this for my 2003 V6 Accord. The difference was day and night, with regards to how smooth and on the dot the idle rpm was, post procedure.

If you're OCD about that, you don't want to take apart the intake manifold above the spacer that connects to the cylinder heads. You wouldn't believe how much oil and crud from the PCV system ends up in there, as well as stuff from the EGR system.

About to do this again, this time on our 2003. EGR and manifold cleanup seems to be one of those items that should be on a 50,000-mile interval in the owner's manual, but I just do it at the timing belt change interval.

Pretty much every Honda or Acura V6 since the late 1990's has to deal with the bugbear of PCV and EGR grime for the intake tract about a foot downstream from the TB.

OF
Cleaning the intake manifold will always be on my to do list whenever I clean the throttle body. The last time I did this on my 2003 V6 Accord, I said to myself that I will never ignore cleaning the intake manifold along with throttle body cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Last time I did it on my 99, I was amazed at how much sticky black 'crud' was still in there despite my repeated Sea Foam cleaning (using the brake vaccum hose method) and LIBERAL throttle body cleaning. In fact, I was also dismayed by the Idle Air Control valve (which was why I took it apart) gummed up by the same stuff. I guess its just sticky carbon residue. I had to clear the EGR port with a drill bit (as per Honda procedure). Took a few hours but it all went back together perfectly. BIG difference after it was done.
 

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Here is the excerpt from the 2014 Honda Odyssey service manual:

2014 Odyssey-Throttle Body Cleaning-page1.png 2014 Odyssey-Throttle Body Cleaning-page2.png
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the link! Where can I order the service manual online? Also, what's the 'HDS'?
 

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Thanks for the link! Where can I order the service manual online? Also, what's the 'HDS'?
I believe the paper service manual is only available for the 2011-2012 and the 2013-2014 is still not available yet and may never be. There is another thread on that issue.

The info I posted is from Honda ISIS (Integrated Service Information System). The info is also available in Honda Service Express via subscription.

The HDS (Honda Diagnostic System) software is used in conjunction with the MVCI (Modular Vehicle Communication Interface) that connects to the DLC (Data Link Connector) on the vehicle.

See links posted by JCsHonda in the previous post.
 

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Wanted to clean throttle body today. So, once I removed those black air passages, I saw that the throttle plate is still shiny golden yellow. The throttle body aluminium passage is also shiny, even around the circumference of the throttle plate. So, I cancelled the idea of throttle body cleaning. I'll do it in the next 3 years or 20,000 miles, whichever comes later.
 

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Can anyone tell me which is the best way to remove the TPS sensor? do I need to remove the whole throttle body?
The Throttle Position Sensor is all integrated with the Electronic Throttle Control System (ETCS.) Yes, you have to remove the entire throttle body. If you clean the throttle body you will need a bidirectional (professional) scan tool to reset the Throttle Position data and relearn the idle. No matter what you read on the Internet, the idle CANNOT be relearned without resetting this data with a scan tool. I learned this the hard way and now have a scan tool capable of resetting it.
 

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I just read all about cleaning the throttle body, and how it is on everybody's to-do list.
If you have to remove it to clean it, it will remain on my to-do list until I no longer own this vehicle.
(2003 Odyssey with 91k miles). The less you mess, you'll have less stress. Every time I do anything on this car, it opens a can of worms.
 

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I just read all about cleaning the throttle body, and how it is on everybody's to-do list.
If you have to remove it to clean it, it will remain on my to-do list until I no longer own this vehicle.
(2003 Odyssey with 91k miles). The less you mess, you'll have less stress. Every time I do anything on this car, it opens a can of worms.
Your 2003 Odyssey throttle body is quite different than what's being discussed here. Yours uses a cable. These are electronic dive by wire systems.
 

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Your 2003 Odyssey throttle body is quite different than what's being discussed here. Yours uses a cable. These are electronic dive by wire systems.
In a number of YouTube videos, I see folks spraying throttle body cleaner (Seafoam or CRC) in somewhere between the intake hose and the throttle body with a U-shaped hose. You basically undo the air intake hose, then hook in the little cleaner hose, and reattach the intake. Then you start the engine and begin spraying the cleaner.
Where will that gunk go if not further into the engine manifold or onto the valves? I've heard raves about how the engine performs better, but you never hear the shortly thereafter followups.

Another thing is the MAP sensor, does it makes sense to take it out and clean it after? Is it better to just buy another one?
What say yee?
 

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Don't clean MAP sensors. Unless it has a known problem I'd just leave it alone.

The spraying into the tube with the engine running is an attempt to clean carbon from the induction system. It may do some cleaning of carbon inside the cylinders but I doubt it will do anything about carbon around the throttle plate. If it does, you still need to relearn the idle.
 
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