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I have had my 2000 Odyssey---previous owner was very much by the book on maintenance schedule---at the dealer only---every nit picking little item was tended to by the dealer.

It has 214K on it now, transmission was bad when I got it--he revealed that to me upfront.

Now I need to do a left CV half shaft replacement. And its time for timing belt kit too. Front brake pads are near the end. Rotors have been resurfaced but never replaced.

If it turns out to be the axle, with this mileage I am considering replacing brake pads, rotor (($60), caliper ($75), and the bearing hub assembly ($50-100 each) (I recently learned in our rust and salt conditions calipers tend to start freezing up about this age at times one doesn't want to pay for tow trucks and repair shops on Sunday afternoon when 150 miles from home)------the reason for all these parts to be replaced is labor wise----its pretty much all torn apart to do the CV shaft anyhow.

Related to the timing belt, I am also considering draining the antifreeze and replacing all heat/radiator hoses along with all belts.

All of this is because of age, the way bearing wear out and (calipers) the way rust shows up and causes problems at times that are very inconvenient and cause tow trucks and expensive repair shops to do repairs at time like Sunday night when wanting to get home from 150 miles away.

Also, in a Suburban, in this area I learned at 10-12 years radiators were likely to fail, whats the history on Odyssey radiators length of life?

I know this seem like "shotgunning" ALOT of parts, but labor wise---to a point they are all kind of tied together and it seems I would save labor hours in the long run to do it this way---whats your thoughts about that?
 

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My '99 with 195k miles, owned since new, self-maintained other than 3 dealer AT replacements, has had new front rotors and one TB change, but none of the other stuff you're mentioning.

I'd recommend doing only what's needed. Save your $$ for the transmissions (yes, that was plural ;-) ).

Things that could cause problems, especially at higher mileage on this car are: ignition switch, and ignition coils. I've had 2 coils fail so far, replaced all of them, and now carry a spare in the car. Very easy to troubleshoot and replace, but they do seem to wear out. Lots of info on this forum on these issues.
 

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Timing belt kit, brake fluid flush, power steering flush, transmission flush. Then, rebuild the calipers for the brakes and redo the bushings and shocks. At that mileage, I'd consider replacing all of the coils if any of them fail.

Still about 2k+ of shop work.
 

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Hey OldSkewl...what symptoms do you get when the ignition coil has gone bad?
Thanks!
Engine runs rough. Sometimes really rough. CEL comes on, with Engine Misfire codes P1399, maybe some others like ?? P030# ??. From memory, the P1399 says there is a misfire somewhere, and the P0301 (for example) indicates a misfire on cylinder 1 (numbering is just like reading a book - standing at the front of the car, looking back at the engine, the back row reads 1,2,3 from left to right, etc.). Sometimes you don't get the P030#. Sometimes you get several of them indicating multiple cylinders, but it is really only one. It could even be that the true failed cylinder is not reported while others are, so don't pay attention to the #.

To confirm and isolate which coil has failed, remove the plastic cover (2 plastic screws turn 90 degrees to release it) over the front 3 coils/spark plugs. With the engine running, one cylinder at a time: remove the low voltage wiring connector to each coil, with your hand on the engine top to feel if the idle feels any rougher or has no change when you remove it; then reconnect the connector and move to the next cylinder. If the coil for that cylinder has failed, you should not detect any change in idle roughness when the connector is removed. If the coil is good, when removed the idle will get rougher because you just killed that cylinder.

Once you've isolated the failed coil (cylinder really), it is possible that the spark plug or something in the wiring failed. So to be sure, swap the failed coil suspect with a good coil and see if the failure shifts to the new cylinder. That will confirm that it's the coil and not the spark plug or wiring or ECU or something else. You need a 6mm Allen wrench to remove the coil, that's it.
 
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