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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My hypothesis: a crank bolt is hardest to remove when it鈥檚 never been removed, and still has the factory torque setting.

Thoughts?

After watching all the nightmare crank bolt removal videos鈥鈥檝e decided to jump from a ladder on to 15 feet of breaker extensions. I feel confident 馃槀
 

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11 Odyssey EX-L
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It will all depend on how the crank bolt was reinstalled.... to torque spec, 1/2" Ingersoll Rand with 5 seconds of "ugga-diggas" or the I don't care tech that uses a 3/4" impact gun like the one he used to take the bolt off the first time. Typically 3 feet of leverage with a 1/2" breaker bar and the crank holder tool is enough to get it loose. One key is having the clearance between the bolt and the ground to have sufficient clearance to get enough swing or room to get the proper tools in that tight space.
 

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It's really not that much of a nightmare to remove. Lisle socket + the strong Milwaukee impact will have it off in seconds, literally.

And even bolts that have been removed will still be some work to remove later.
 

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I鈥檝e decided to jump from a ladder on to 15 feet of breaker extensions. I feel confident 馃槀
You'll break your legs. Get impact and heavy socket.
 
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99.99% of Honda or Acura crankshaft pulley bolts will respond favorably to Lisle socket + impact tools.

I've only personally experienced one outlier. Had to replace a failing, leaking OEM timing belt tensioner on a 2012 Accord EX-L. The bolt did not loosen with the Lisle driven by an AirCat 1150 with maximum allowed and sustained line pressure. The square drive on the Lisle socket ending up showing some damage.

The scenario posted in jest by @Makaha ... I did something like that. I used 3/4" and 1" square drive tools. Mere 1/2" drive tools would have failed
  • First, mounted the crank pulley holder held with an S-K breaker bar on a jackstand
  • 3/4" drive 19mm socket onto the crank pulley bolt with 3/4"-to-1" drive impact-rated adapter with extension
  • 1" drive extension socket end on a jackstand with an almost 4-foot-long 1" drive breaker bar
  • 10-foot long cheater bar
I put all of my weight on the cheater bar ... no luck. Very carefully bounced up and down a little on it, and finally broke free that blamed bolt.

I should have taken pictures of the setup. Truly a Rube Goldberg affair. Easily in excess of 1,500 ft-lbs. of breakaway force required for that one.

Hope to all that is Holy that the second time is easier.

OF
 
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If you have the van on a lift, the breaker bar/holder tool and long extension seems like it would work. ETCG used a really long extension in his video and it loosened right up. Anything else, get the killer torque impact gun with thick socket and in my case, it was off in a few seconds.
 

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The easiest most guaranteed way is to get the 3/4" breaker bar, 3/4" extension set, and a 3/4" 19mm socket. Even if you have to put your 4' long Jack handle over the breaker, the extensions don't flex and the bolt will break loose.

The other trick is to lower the car close to the ground to wedge your pulley-holder & 1/2" breaker bar. Then rest your 3/4" extension on a jackstand before attaching the 3/4" breaker and extension. This provides all the support you'll need to break the bolt loose the first time every time.
 

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The idea that the Honda crank bolt is easier to remove the second time is incorrect. Typically, the crank bolt is only touched when replacing the timing belt which would be 7 years or more in between. During the 7 years of driving the crank bolt achieves harmony with the crank pulley and they are like lovers that are hard to separate. The crank bolt has a tendency to self tighten over time. Every time a cylinder fires there is a slight acceleration of the crank. If you watch slow motion recordings of NHRA Top Fuel dragsters and watch the rear tires you can see what I mean.

I have heard of people who planned to do a timing belt at home and asked their local mechanic to zip out and zip in the crank bolt right before they attempted the job. I think this might work.
 

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The crank on Honda V6 rotates clockwise. IF the bolt moved from combustion or crank harmonics, it would be working itself loose, not tightening. That's why people sometimes use the starter-trick to break the bolt loose (I don't recommend).

But either way I would definitely agree no it's NOT easier the second time........ UNLESS......you just installed the bolt with fresh oil between the bolt-head and washer (per instruction manual). That's the only time I find it easier to remove. I'm sure that oil film vanishes in no time though.
 

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Which is probably why the timing belt idler pulley has loctite on the bolt from the factory and should always have loctite put back on it when installing.
 

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Some cars like the Civic we used to own have the crank pulley on the drivers side. Starter trick wont work.
Yeah, I believe many of the vintage Honda engines were like this. D series comes to mind.
 

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Your absolutely right. My point was that if the engine were to move the crank bolt (which it doesn't), its orientation would cause it to loosen over time.

Reverse threaded wheel nuts go on the right side of race cars for this very reason.
You are correct.
 

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Some vehicles used to have left hand thread lug nuts on one side...which side were they?
Isuzu NPR trucks and some late 60's Pontiac and there are a few others that ran right hand threads for the wheel studs on the passenger side of the vehicle and left hand threads for the wheel studs on the driver side. I know on the NPR trucks that there was an "L" stamped into the tip of the stud if it was a left hand thread. There is some science behind why an engineer thought this was necessary, but in real world applications there were more people snapping the studs because they were taking them off the wrong way which created more of a problem than the lug nuts actually loosening themselves.
 
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