Honda Odyssey Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im going to replace my timing belt pretty soon and I'm just trying gather all the Info I need about the job. In the service data it says to torque to a certain amount and then go another 60°. I know some bolts that you torque to yield you have to replace because it stretches the threads. Is this the case? The service Data doesn't say to replace but I was wondering what you guys thought. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
621 Posts
Don't think the crank bolt is a stretch bolt
 

·
Registered
2016 Touring Elite
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
The service Data doesn't say to replace but I was wondering what you guys thought.
The repair manual has specific instructions on how to reuse the bolt - I'd say it is fine to reuse it.

(where to clean, where to apply new oil, etc.)

-Charlie
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2011.2017.odyssey

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
What if you just ugga dugga the bolt through and not do the 60°? Would it "not" stay tight or what? Just curious about it because the crank bolt I dealt with on my other car just had a torque spec.... thats all 😁
 

·
Registered
2016 Touring Elite
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
What if you just ugga dugga the bolt through and not do the 60°? Would it "not" stay tight or what? Just curious about it because the crank bolt I dealt with on my other car just had a torque spec.... thats all 😁
Too many ugga duggas and it might not come off in the future. Hondas are notorious for hard to remove crank bolts. The low inititial torque value + angle helps get a more reliable (not too high) clamping force, which aides future removal.

I have used the 'ugga dugga' method on many other vehicles though. ;)

-Charlie
 

·
Registered
2012 EX-L, >128k miles, VCM Tuner, Honda tow pkg.
Joined
·
855 Posts
Torque + 60 degrees is easy. No need for an angle guage because the sides of a hex bolt are 60 degrees from one another. Just use the torque wrench for the initial setting, and then mark one side of the bolt head and the adjacent metal. Then turn it so the next side of the bolt head lines up with the mark.
 

·
Registered
2000 Odyssey LX, 2003 Odyssey EX, 2011 Odyssey EXL, 2016 HRV
Joined
·
126 Posts
man what a rip! I just put a new crankshaft pulley on my 2000 Odyssey and had to buy a new 3/4" drive torque wrench to torque it to 181 ft-lbs and job done, just like my shop manual says. All's fine. Now, I just got a 2011 Odyssey, so I bought a shop manual for that model and saw this thread and checked and lo and behold it does say to torque the bolt to only 48 ft-lbs and THEN turn it another 60 degrees. I wonder if you could use that technique on the 2nd generation pulleys? I could have used my 1/2 drive torque wrench. I needed that big wrench though for axle nuts and suspension parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
You have more tools now. I think it's a win in disguise lol
Thanks to many posts on here talking about the Milwaukee 2767 and the Lisle heavy mass socket, I told my wife that I was going to get what I needed for the TB&WP that I need to install soon. I've been wanting that Milwaukee since I first saw one, but couldn't justify the cost. Now that I have a few more candles on the cake I can; I'm not as strong as I used to be, but damn if these battery-powered tools don't make life easier.

I waited until this summer to buy a MoJack lift for my zero-turn to make sharpening the blades easier. I wish I would have bought that thing 10 years ago.
 

·
Registered
2000 Odyssey LX, 2003 Odyssey EX, 2011 Odyssey EXL, 2016 HRV
Joined
·
126 Posts
I don't know about removing the the 4th gen model (I have a 2011) crank bolt but I suspect it is the same bolt as always used on the J engines. I recently had a timing belt service done on this low mileage but 11 year old van and I had them install a new crankshaft pulley (harmonic balancer) with fresh rubber while they had the old but still good one off. Reason being, just in September, on my 2000 LX (2nd gen) I had the pulley come apart at the rubber seam and shed the drive belt. Let me relate some experience I had with the Honda crankshaft pulley bolt, otherwise know as the BOLT FROM HELL and my waste of money on some tools. By the way, the dealer quoted $660 to do this job. Removed the right front tire and partially pulled back the wheel well plastic cowling. I started with my 1/2 drive Harbor Freight Earthquake air wrench. Would not budge it. Disclosure: I am only feeding it air from a Craftsman 30 gallon compressor through 3/8" hose which is good enough for lug nuts and even axle nuts. Wasted $70 on the Ingersoll Rand 19mm special socket designed for this job-did not work. Wasted another $20 on an OEM (AutoZone) heavy duty special socket designed for this job. Didn't work. Bought the Honda hex hold down tool and tried the air wrench and sockets again-no luck. Now remember, I am up on jack stands with not unlimited space underneath. But I bought a 25" HF 1/2" drive breaker bar sticking out from under the front bumper and using another 18" breaker bar to steady the hold down tool I couldn't break it loose, even with a floor jack on the breaker bar pushing up to the point the 1/2" drive bar was bowing badly and was likely to fail. Finally found a HF 3/4" drive Earthquake air wrench and bought it to give the gimmicky sockets another chance. I had upgraded my 3/8 inch air line to all new 1/2" hose and fittings, but it still didn't work. Side note: unless you have over a $1000 plus, 60 gal air compressor, your air wrenches are underfed and won't give you the advertised "nut busting" torque. HF (bless their heart) let me return the $360 big honkin' air wrench that I really don't need even for automotive lug nuts. So after relating this all to a Honda service writer who used to wrench there, found out that the dealership techs there use breaker bars to get that bolt off. So got on that jungle river site and I bought a manly 40" long 3/4" drive breaker bar made by Tecton (Taiwan), (2) 16" long 3/4" drive Crescent brand socket extensions (China), a 3/4" to 1/2" impact socket adaptor from HF(China), and my 1/2" drive Craftsman 19mm impact socket (USA). This will get you out past the fender. Got out the van's tire jack and sat it on top of two stacked pieces of scrap 6x6 to rest the whole contraption on, and put my whole 187 lbs. weight on it. Use mechanic gloves for this. First time, the holder slipped and gave me a little bit of whiplash. Repositioned that and gave it the old college try. This time it broke free with a loud pop. I think I heard my new awesome breaker bar chuckling during this. That was over 650 ft.-lbs. of REAL torque, not tapping from an air wrench. The bolt did NOT have Loctite on it as I suspected. Some vehicles you have to get a pully remover. The Honda one just wiggles off, hence the need for a tight bolt. Unless you want to spend $500 on the electric 700 series Milwaukee (which I hear is awesome but may not work on a stubborn bolt like mine) and you don't already have an air wrench, I would recommend you go with the same breaker bar/extension set up. It works! I ended up spending nearly the same but, except for the gimmicky sockets, now I have some great tools and upgrades to keep forever. And it was fun too...:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't know about removing the the 4th gen model (I have a 2011) crank bolt but I suspect it is the same bolt as always used on the J engines. I recently had a timing belt service done on this low mileage but 11 year old van and I had them install a new crankshaft pulley (harmonic balancer) with fresh rubber while they had the old but still good one off. Reason being, just in September, on my 2000 LX (2nd gen) I had the pulley come apart at the rubber seam and shed the drive belt. Let me relate some experience I had with the Honda crankshaft pulley bolt, otherwise know as the BOLT FROM HELL and my waste of money on some tools. By the way, the dealer quoted $660 to do this job. Removed the right front tire and partially pulled back the wheel well plastic cowling. I started with my 1/2 drive Harbor Freight Earthquake air wrench. Would not budge it. Disclosure: I am only feeding it air from a Craftsman 30 gallon compressor through 3/8" hose which is good enough for lug nuts and even axle nuts. Wasted $70 on the Ingersoll Rand 19mm special socket designed for this job-did not work. Wasted another $20 on an OEM (AutoZone) heavy duty special socket designed for this job. Didn't work. Bought the Honda hex hold down tool and tried the air wrench and sockets again-no luck. Now remember, I am up on jack stands with not unlimited space underneath. But I bought a 25" HF 1/2" drive breaker bar sticking out from under the front bumper and using another 18" breaker bar to steady the hold down tool I couldn't break it loose, even with a floor jack on the breaker bar pushing up to the point the 1/2" drive bar was bowing badly and was likely to fail. Finally found a HF 3/4" drive Earthquake air wrench and bought it to give the gimmicky sockets another chance. I had upgraded my 3/8 inch air line to all new 1/2" hose and fittings, but it still didn't work. Side note: unless you have over a $1000 plus, 60 gal air compressor, your air wrenches are underfed and won't give you the advertised "nut busting" torque. HF (bless their heart) let me return the $360 big honkin' air wrench that I really don't need even for automotive lug nuts. So after relating this all to a Honda service writer who used to wrench there, found out that the dealership techs there use breaker bars to get that bolt off. So got on that jungle river site and I bought a manly 40" long 3/4" drive breaker bar made by Tecton (Taiwan), (2) 16" long 3/4" drive Crescent brand socket extensions (China), a 3/4" to 1/2" impact socket adaptor from HF(China), and my 1/2" drive Craftsman 19mm impact socket (USA). This will get you out past the fender. Got out the van's tire jack and sat it on top of two stacked pieces of scrap 6x6 to rest the whole contraption on, and put my whole 187 lbs. weight on it. Use mechanic gloves for this. First time, the holder slipped and gave me a little bit of whiplash. Repositioned that and gave it the old college try. This time it broke free with a loud pop. I think I heard my new awesome breaker bar chuckling during this. That was over 650 ft.-lbs. of REAL torque, not tapping from an air wrench. The bolt did NOT have Loctite on it as I suspected. Some vehicles you have to get a pully remover. The Honda one just wiggles off, hence the need for a tight bolt. Unless you want to spend $500 on the electric 700 series Milwaukee (which I hear is awesome but may not work on a stubborn bolt like mine) and you don't already have an air wrench, I would recommend you go with the same breaker bar/extension set up. It works! I ended up spending nearly the same but, except for the gimmicky sockets, now I have some great tools and upgrades to keep forever. And it was fun too...:rolleyes:
If
 

·
Registered
2000 Odyssey LX, 2003 Odyssey EX, 2011 Odyssey EXL, 2016 HRV
Joined
·
126 Posts
get that strongest one. You'll probably need the holding tool to get it off and you WILL need it to torque the bolt back on. Don't waste money on the Ingersoll Rand socket. I don't think the Lisle socket (or its knockoffs) work either. Didn't work for me. I'm sure others strongly disagree and maybe it worked for them.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top