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Discussion Starter #1
Trying to replace my o2 sensor bank 1 sensor 1 on 07 odyssey. Can't for the life of me get the original unclipped from the unit it's connected to. Can't see back there, doing it all by touch. No YouTube videos show the disconnection. Any photos to help would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here's a picture of what I can get with my phone. But does me no good when I need both hands for the job.
159866
 

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There should be a tab you push back there (red arrow). The connector should come off at the green line.

I would recommend looking up the replacement part so you can see what the connector looks like on the sensor pigtail.
Screenshot_20210113-132313~2.jpg


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Discussion Starter #4
OK, got it disconnected. However, I did so by pulling the top part of the assembly upward. The part with the blue wire (the actual piece that needs to come out) seems to be held in place and immobile for some reason. There are no ties or anchor clips on my replacement part so any idea how to remove further from here?

P.S. I am not a mechanically inclined woman. I can figure out most things but know enough from experience not to just go detaching things I'm not 100% sure come detached.
 

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You have to slide the connected connector off of the flat tang of the metal bracket before the two halves can be separated.

To remove the connector from the tang locate the lip of the tang and then lift up on the little catch on the connector then slide the connector off of the tang.

159869
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all. Now last question is, how long after it's replaced do I know if it's successful? It was one option for the p0420 code, so figured I would diagnosis cheapest to most expensive. Disconnected battery and let idle about 15 minutes, then drove about 5 miles and still off. Am I in the clear?
 

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This is not specific to the Odyssey, but most vehicles usually require a small number of trips before they can evaluate whether or not there is an issue with the emissions. The trips comes into play because, especially in winter, driving a short distance really doesn't go far enough to get everything in a state where the O2 sensors provide readings good enough to control the engine. Those sensors have to get hot enough to be working in a normal steady state and it may take several trips to set the check engine light.

Some issues are quick to set the emissions light, like if you disconnect a spark plug wire or don't connect the O2 sensor harness. Others take a while to set off a error and even more trips without error to turn that check engine light back off.

If you have a OBDII scan tool it should be able to tell you if those monitors like catalyst, evap system, etc fully tested and ready.

In NJ, we have to have our cars in a state where most of the monitors have evaluated themselves and there is still no check engine light. A trick that people unsuccessfully use is to disconnect the battery and clear any active or pending codes. The emissions folks know that a car was not driven long enough to check out as good and they send you away until all of those monitors clear.
 

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2007 Odyssey EX-L
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5 miles won't be enough to determine if the light will stay off for good. Especially if it's some other finnicky sensor, it's possible/likely that it will come back in a few hundred miles, and if not, perhaps in 1-2K miles.
 
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In NJ, we have to have our cars in a state where most of the monitors have evaluated themselves and there is still no check engine light. A trick that people unsuccessfully use is to disconnect the battery and clear any active or pending codes. The emissions folks know that a car was not driven long enough to check out as good and they send you away until all of those monitors clear.
Kinda depends on what the issue is. In NJ, we can have one incomplete monitor. If it's a finnicky sensor (like I have on my Toyota), the check engine light doesn't come back until a few hundred miles after the codes are cleared. The car's computer is typically ready before the check engine light comes back, so there is a narrow window that the car is ready and will pass. It's worked for me in 2017 and 2019... car is due again later this year, so I'll see if I can get it to pass again.
 
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