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Discussion Starter #1
I have 2010 EX, have a dead short. Draining the battery every night at least 2-5 volts. Changed out the air compressor models and have done every test I can think of. Changed the alternator in June 2018. Getting to a point of being stranded. I have to unhook my pos. neg. cables every night. Can't be good for the computer. Could it be the voltage regulator on the alternator? Any advice helpful
 

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The relays seem to be ok. I metered them and bought a new one just in case. Switched them around also, as they are the same. Thank you for any help.
 

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First test the battery. It should have at least 12.6V with the engine off. (The van consumes some power when parked. If the battery is good, it can provide that power for days and still start the engine no problem. If it's weak, that power can leave the battery unable to start the engine.)

Next, identify the parasitic circuit. Connect a DMM on amps scale to the negative battery terminal. Then pull the fuses one by one until the DMM shows a drop in current.

Then diagnose the problem within the circuit.

Many videos on YT, such as this one by Eric the Car Guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes saw that video by Eric, Ill try this. The positive side of the meter right? Have another back up battery also.
 

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You don't have a "dead short." You have a parasitic draw (assuming you don't just have a bad battery that doesn't hold a charge overnight.) That means something is on that shouldn't be. A dead short would blow fuses, melt wires, or drain a full battery in minutes.

There are various methods for narrowing down the circuit that is causing the drain. All are fairly technical in nature and require some in depth troubleshooting, along with certain procedures for preparing the vehicle to look for the draw.
 

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The positive side of the meter right?
Not 100% sure what you are asking...

If about the meter, + to the battery cable, - to the battery post.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You don't have a "dead short." You have a parasitic draw (assuming you don't just have a bad battery that doesn't hold a charge overnight.) That means something is on that shouldn't be. A dead short would blow fuses, melt wires, or drain a full battery in minutes.

There are various methods for narrowing down the circuit that is causing the drain. All are fairly technical in nature and require some in depth troubleshooting, along with certain procedures for preparing the vehicle to look for the draw.
Thank you for your help, very much appreciated. I have dealt with this for some time. Do you believe a dealership could help me? Is there a simple test that could be performed? I have been pulling fuses to try to narrow it down. I do have a faulty pass. side slider switch. I pulled both of these fuses, but I don't think I have it licked yet. thank you again.
 

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Thank you for your help, very much appreciated. I have dealt with this for some time. Do you believe a dealership could help me? Is there a simple test that could be performed? I have been pulling fuses to try to narrow it down. I do have a faulty pass. side slider switch. I pulled both of these fuses, but I don't think I have it licked yet. thank you again.
A faulty switch?
 

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Finding parasitic draw can be complicated. Not sure there is a "simple" test as "simple" is all in the experience level of the tester. If it were mine, I'd put an amp clamp on the power feed to the module after the vehicle has been shut off and all modules have gone to sleep. That's relatively simple but requires some equipment like a scope with an amp clamp, and removing the rear quarter trim panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm going to try the method in Eric the car guy's video. It started well this morning. I removed both sliding door fuses. I will wait a day and see what happens. Thank you again for your help.
 

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Above, I asked about this "switch" you referred to but you never answered back. Do you have any sliding doors that don't work? If the draw is caused by one of the sliding doors, then the draw is caused by the sliding door module staying awake due to one of the four micro switches in the door latch not opening or closing properly. This draw usually occurs on fuse #7 in the driver's side fuse box. Pulling the R/L sliding door fuses (I think they're like 30A fuses) just pulls the fuse to the electric motors which are not the source of the draw.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Above, I asked about this "switch" you referred to but you never answered back. Do you have any sliding doors that don't work? If the draw is caused by one of the sliding doors, then the draw is caused by the sliding door module staying awake due to one of the four micro switches in the door latch not opening or closing properly. This draw usually occurs on fuse #7 in the driver's side fuse box. Pulling the R/L sliding door fuses (I think they're like 30A fuses) just pulls the fuse to the electric motors which are not the source of the draw.
Sorry about not answering quick. Rough week. I do have a bad door on the passenger side. I pulled the fuses and found out the right fuse is the pass. slider, not the left. Still getting a draw from some where though. My TPMS light came on after my low pressure light lit up. This means a malfunction there also. I pulled the fuse to it and the light stayed on. (because of no fuse) Put the fuse back in and hopefully reset it. Still losing about 3/4 volt after 8 hours. Just enough not to start. Trying other test I saw on utube. After that pulling fuses. Thanks again for the help.
 

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The only way to stop the draw is to fix or replace the bad door latch, pull the #7 Backup fuse from the driver's side fuse box, or unplug the sliding door module for the inop sliding door. Generally, the easiest thing to do is replace the offending door latch assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The only way to stop the draw is to fix or replace the bad door latch, pull the #7 Backup fuse from the driver's side fuse box, or unplug the sliding door module for the inop sliding door. Generally, the easiest thing to do is replace the offending door latch assembly.
Yes this looks that way. I have to get inside the door to unplug the latch, wouldn't I? I pulled the fuse (40amp) under the hood and the #7. This is what has me worried as that I still have a draw. I think I have a weekend project.
 

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Assuming the draw is caused by the door, unplugging the latch will not help. You need to unplug the computer module that runs the door.

If you pulled the #7 fuse and you still have a draw, then your issue isn't the sliding door(s.) You need to first determine, exactly, which circuit the draw is happening on.
 

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I think that means pulling fuse by fuse. I started it last night and all was well. 4 hrs since I last ran it. This morning went to start it, after 9 hrs overnight, barly enough to turn the engine over. Back to the drawing board.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Is it possible that the TPMS could be causing the draw? It failed yesterday on my way to work. Also, I put a new alternator in in 2018. Aftermarket, not oem. The voltage regulator is on the alternator, maybe that is staying open or closed when I shut the vehicle off? Does that make sense?
 

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I think that means pulling fuse by fuse. I started it last night and all was well. 4 hrs since I last ran it. This morning went to start it, after 9 hrs overnight, barly enough to turn the engine over. Back to the drawing board.
Personally, I use the mV check of the fuses rather than pull them one by one. Here's the issue. You have to put the vehicle into a state where you can even check for a parasitic draw. That means the vehicle has to think all the doors are closed, key is out, dome lights are off, and computers go to sleep. Only problem is, you need to open the doors and hood in order to do your tests. That means you need to latch the doors and either tape the dome light buttons in the door jamb or remove them. The vehicle will then need to sit for about 30-60 minutes to allow all the different modules to go to sleep. If you don't wait, you'll see modules awake that will show an amp draw.

Once you have the vehicle ready, you need to connect your meter. You can remove one battery terminal and use your meter in "amps" mode to connect the battery cable to the battery. Most meters have a 10A fuse in them so you have to be careful not to do anything that will exceed that amount of current or you'll blow the fuse in your meter. That means no lights, or any high draw items that could exceed 10A. Once you get your meter in line with the battery then you wait your 30-60 minutes and check the draw. Note, reconnecting the battery cable to the battery through your meter will wake up the modules again and you'll need to wait 30 mins again for things to go to sleep. After everything has shut down fully, you should have 50mA (0.050A) or less. If it's much higher than that you have a parasitic draw.

Here's where your testing begins. If you just start pulling fuses you can potentially reboot modules. That means when you put the fuse back in you'll have a higher draw than you had before pulling it until that circuit goes to sleep again. The method I use is to use another meter in the mV scale and check for voltage drop across the fuse. There are charts out there to tell you how much voltage drop across a fuse there will be if there is current flowing in the circuit. If there's no current flow you'll see 0mV. Using this method requires two meters but doesn't wake up modules by removing fuses. Once you find one with current flow you can pull it and see if your draw goes away on the other meter.

This procedure takes practice and time. However, it's what's required in order to find the offending circuit.
 
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