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What is the proper tire pressure for Touring with conventional tires? I have depaxed with 2009 Acura TL 17 inch rims with Kumho Solus KR21 size 235 60 17.

BTW, the Kumho KR21 tires are excellent. Quiet and nice handling. Huge improvement over the PAX.
 

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Why do you think the tire pressue would be any different?
 

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well, let's find out. post your PAX pressure levels from the door placard and I'll check out our 2010 Tour placard to post and we'll compare. you know what they say about those who assume too much ...
 

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Reading tire pressure in the door placards is so much work as one's gotta get up and go all the way to the Oddy. ALL years' owner's manuals list the tire pressure for all trims and we can look up all the manuals online.

The tire pressure information for Tourings is on page 347 for a 2005, 354 for a 2006, 384 for a 2007, page 444 for a 2008 model and 452 for a 2009 model.

Since 2008 & 2009 were the years that offered both the conventional and PAX tires, I would go by what the 2008 and 2009 manual says which is the same for Tourings with and without PAX.

You know what they say about those who assume too much ...
 

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At the sake of being "too much help", I'm running the same tires and size and run 37 psi all the way around.

I've noticed that most people on the forum have found better wear with higher pressures, especially on these behemoths.

Lou.
 

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Sorry this took so long, walking out to the "Oddy" (sic) and all that, just as poor, overworked DV laments above as too trying for his own purposes, whatever those are.

I guess I'm just old fashioned in my belief that this should be an open forum for sharing ideas and information, not for some sort of misguided attempt at showing off something -- what exactly? -- , for example.

So, my more lengthy approach is to actually post the answer to the OP's question -- imagine that! -- in case future searchers need to know this information, that is rather than just where to find it themselves, ASSuming that they had handy or knew where to access those references (to which, I note, the other non-response unhelpfully gives no links).

2010 (no-Pax) Ody Tour w/ OEM 17" wheels.
Fr 33 cold PSI
Rr 35
Spare 60 - folks, don't forget to air your spare!

I usually run a few extra PSI in the front, say 35 cold psi, but too much air negatively affects initial impact harshness and even my wife notices. Tolerances differ, as the prior "too helpful" poster's useful answer indicates, and YMMV. Too much pressure also can cause premature center wear, but I don't know the break point.

Be sure you have a spare for your new de-pax set.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
homer's van said:
Sorry this took so long, walking out to the "Oddy" (sic) and all that, just as poor, overworked DV laments above as too trying for his own purposes, whatever those are.

I guess I'm just old fashioned in my belief that this should be an open forum for sharing ideas, not for some sort of misguided attempt at showing off something -- what exactly? -- , for example.

So, my more lengthy approach is to actually post the answer to the OP's question -- imagine that! -- in case future searchers need to know this information, that is rather than just where to find it themselves, ASSuming that they had handy or knew where to access those references (to which, I note, the other non-response unhelpfully gives no links).

2010 (no-Pax) Ody Tour w/ OEM 17" wheels.
Fr 33 cold PSI
Rr 35
Spare 60 - folks, don't forget to air your spare!

I usually run a few extra PSI in the front, say 35 cold psi, but too much air negatively affects initial impact harshness and even my wife notices. Tolerances differ, as the prior "too helpful" poster's useful answer indicates, and YMMV. Too much pressure also can cause premature center wear, but I don't know the break point.

Be sure you have a spare for your new de-pax set.


Thank you for confirming the tire pressures for the Touring non-pax.

I just find it odd that the recommended tire pressure for the EX-L is higher for the front tires than for the Touring, EX-L is 35 psi while Touring is 33 psi. Yet, rear pressures are the same at 35 psi.
 

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It's my pleasure. I've noticed that difference before for Touring vs. EX, too. Some of us tune our pressures to personal preference, whereas the manufacturer tries to give a compromise number addressing ride, efficiency and handling. Maybe the 2 psi reduction addresses the initial impact harshness I mentioned for the Touring's lower profile tires compared to the taller sidewall lesser models?
Best of luck.
(I hope that you did not spend too much time hunting down all of those manual pages online!)
 

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I'd like to address a part of the post by homer's van: "Too much pressure also can cause premature center wear, but I don't know the break point." My experience with this issue is that it is a non-issue: it is almost impossible to stretch the belt unevenly on a modern, belted radial, as one would have to do in order to apply uneven pressure to the tread area, thereby wearing the center of the tread more than the edges. Uneven tread wear, as a result of over-inflation, was a phenomenon in the bias-ply and early, fabric-belted radials days. I believe that is is possible to run the tires at the maximum rated pressure (usually 44+ psi) without uneven wear...if you can stand the harsh ride. UNDER-inflation, however, WILL cause tread wear similar to what we used to see in the old days: premature wear on the edge areas of the tires. But this doesn't happen so much because of uneven pressure on the tread surface (again, the belts on modern tires remain basically, diametrically stable until the inflation pressure falls into the danger zone), but because the tread surface "rolls" under with increased slip angle, transferring load to the edge area and even up, into the sidewall in sufficiently severe cases. Under-inflation is ALWAYS the bogeyman to be avoided. Over-inflation will effect ride and handling (handling, especially when pressures are significantly higher on one end of the vehicle than the other), but is a rather "safe" condition, at least until one does the old "inflate it by eye", like the old bias-ply days, and gets the pressure WAY up...like over 45 - 50 psi.
 
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