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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I braved this one and was rather straightforward than I anticipated. I am mechanically inclined and do more of the maintenance work myself on all my cars. Though I was anxious about the instructions, realistically, the process was very similar to every single ATF and rear diff and center transfer fluid changes I have done in the last 10 years. So I armed myself with lot of prayers, proper tools, sunshine and 43 degree weather to get this done on Sunday.

Disclaimer: Anytime someone modifies or makes repair to their vehicle, they assume the risk of voiding their vehicle's mfgr's warranty and possibly damaging the vehicle if proper care is not taken. By following these suggestions, you are at your own risk as I do not assume responsibility of your install. The owner’s manual recommends that a dealer perform this service.

Difficulty: Intermediate
Time: 1.5 hours (on the ground). I anticipate about an hour with a vehicle post.

Parts Needed
  • Drain bolt washer 90471-PX4-000 (18mm) – 1 qty
  • Fill bolt washer 94109-20000 (20mm) – 1 qty
  • Level check bolt gasket 90471-59C-000
  • Honda ATF Type 2.0 (08200-9015) – 5 qty (5 quarts total)

Tools Needed (add additional tools if needed):
  • ½” drive ratchet
  • ½” to 3/8” adapter
  • 10mm push type nylon fasteners (you may break your stock ones)
  • 10mm socket
  • 17mm socket (short socket, Do not use deep socket)
  • 3/8” drive ratchet
  • 3/8” or ½” Ratchet extensions and swivel joints
  • 5/8” ID (inner Diameter) flexible hose (ATF rated) – 2 feet
  • 5qt Drain pan (clean)
  • Breaker bar – optional
  • Digital inclinometer (magnetic) – optional
  • Honda 10spd ATF replacement procedure booklet (or subscription to a FSM)
  • Hydraulic jack and stands or vehicle lift (optional)
  • Impact gun, cordless - optional
  • Lock Neck Funnel (like a HF 66479/90468)
  • Phillips and flathead screw drivers
  • Safety gloves and goggles
  • Shop rag
  • Torque wrench
  • Work gloves (preferably the oil resistant ones)

IMPORTANT: Prior to starting the project, ensure that you have identified few things: adequate mechanical knowledge, Mental aptitude to get this done, physical dexterity, adequate patience, acceptable weather and humidity, and common sense. If you seem to lack any one of these, you may want to reconsider moving forward.


Preparation
  • Start off by removing the Engine cover, air intake tube (17243-5MR-A00) and the Front bulkhead cover (74117-THR-A00). You will need some room to work around [image below].
  • Move down below and remove the front splash shield (74111-THR-A00) and the metal Transmission cover (74112-TZ5-A02)[image below].
  • Then move the van to a level surface, place it on jack stands and using the magnetic digital inclinometer, ensure that the vehicle is level. Ensure it is level by placing the inclinometer directly to the underbody of the van. If you have a vehicle lifting post, you are extremely blessed.
  • Make sure the vehicle is supported and secured properly prior to working under the van.
g52.jpg g51.jpg

Procedure
  • FIRST, Using the ½” drive ratchet and a 17mm socket, break the fill bolt free. Do not remove it yet. IMPORTANT: If you cannot break this bolt loose, DO NOT drain the ATF. Schedule a service with your dealership.
  • Using a 3/8” ratchet, ½” ratchet with a 3/8” adapter, or a breaker bar, remove the drain bolt and let the ATF fluid drain (may take 10 to 20 min to drain).
  • Remove the fill bolt and discard the old sealing washers from both the fill bolt and the drain bolt.
  • Clean both the bolts [dirty ones pictured below] and install the appropriate sealing washers.
  • Install the drain bolt & washer and torque to 36 ft-lbs
  • Insert the 5/8” tubing to the long neck funnel and insert the tubing into the fill bolt hole (ensure that there are no debris or burrs from the hose) [image below].
  • Once the ATF has drained, measure the volume and write it down.
  • Shake each quart of the ATF for 30sec prior to pouring it into the funnel. Unlike the engine oil that can be dumped rather fast, take your time and slowly add the recommended/amount you took out; adding too fast will cause the fluid to run out of the fill hole.
  • Install the fill bolt and washer and torque to 32 ft-lbs

* I used the socket, swivel, extension and ratchet setup to install the fill bolt back up.

g53.jpg g58.jpg g56.jpg g57.jpg g55.jpg


IMPORTANT: Refer the 10 spd ATF fluid replacement & level check procedure for what type of transmission you have. Also, measure the amount of ATF you drained and it is always safe to put that amount back in (with fresh fluid). I drained approximately 4.25quarts and replaced that amount with new ATF.


ATF Level check
  • Follow the steps detailed in the ATF fluid replacement & Level check procedure found here >> 10 Speed Transmission Fluid Change
  • install the level check bolt and washer (if required). Torque to 15 ft-lbs.
Completion
  • Put everything back together and make sure you reset the maintenance minder accordingly.
  • Go take a shower and clean up as you probably smell like crap at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome, however you left out the amount of swearing, and alcohol involved. We need to know if a 12 pack is need or more

Sent from my LM-V600 using Tapatalk
Luckily, no alcohol or swearing. With the van being new and no rusted or stuck bolts, It was a breeze. It took me around 2 hours and I also did the oil and filter change and cleaned out my catch can.
It took longer to change the oil and filter and ATF on my '05 TL than the O&F and ATF on the G5.
 

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Luckily, no alcohol or swearing. With the van being new and no rusted or stuck bolts, It was a breeze. It took me around 2 hours and I also did the oil and filter change and cleaned out my catch can.
It took longer to change the oil and filter and ATF on my '05 TL than the O&F and ATF on the G5.
Catch can, for carbon buildup? Are you finding a lot of carbon buildup?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Catch can, for carbon buildup? Are you finding a lot of carbon buildup?
Yup, to trap blow-by gases. Cant provide a confirmation till I pull the cylinder heads and inspect the valves.
The catch can is there just a a preventive measure as many with GDI engines have complained about carbon buildup. In the J35Y engines, the placement of the fuel injectors and their spray pattern does claim to 'wash' the back of the valves (by design), but I figured it does not hurt to be cautious.

This is from my oil change this past Sunday

cc1.jpg

This is from my previous oil change in June 2020

cc2.jpg

Though I cannot attest to these amounts being a lot (or not), I can imagine the possible effects of them when touching the hot intake valves, or even the lower intake runners.
 

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Refresh me on which years the 10 spd came on?
2018-2019 Touring and Elite had the 10 spd. LX, EX, and EX-L models came with a ZF-designed 9-speed.

All trims received the 10 spd for 2020.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OP thanks for such a detailed write up. Nice work.

Just curious on pic 4, it seems you have some type of leak no? Seems wet in certain areas.
You are right. There is some fluid seepage between the block and transmission. The Gen 2 Ridgelines with the same engine and different transmission. have similar issues. Nothing catastrophic has happened on those vehicles or mine, but I am anxious even calling a dealership to take a look.
 

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You are right. There is some fluid seepage between the block and transmission. The Gen 2 Ridgelines with the same engine and different transmission. have similar issues. Nothing catastrophic has happened on those vehicles or mine, but I am anxious even calling a dealership to take a look.
I’ve had similar seepage on other cars and it was always something minor like a hardened rubber o-ring or old valve cover gasket. Problem was locating the source being an adventure into the Wild West.

How many miles on yours? I will keep an eye on this area. Again thanks for your sharing .
 

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Yup, to trap blow-by gases. Cant provide a confirmation till I pull the cylinder heads and inspect the valves.
The catch can is there just a a preventive measure as many with GDI engines have complained about carbon buildup. In the J35Y engines, the placement of the fuel injectors and their spray pattern does claim to 'wash' the back of the valves (by design), but I figured it does not hurt to be cautious.

This is from my oil change this past Sunday

View attachment 159849

This is from my previous oil change in June 2020

View attachment 159850

Though I cannot attest to these amounts being a lot (or not), I can imagine the possible effects of them when touching the hot intake valves, or even the lower intake runners.
Please enlighten me. What is a 'catch can'? Are you examining your engine oil that is being drained?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Please enlighten me. What is a 'catch can'? Are you examining your engine oil that is being drained?
Catch can, is a a device, that is placed between the intake manifold and the PCV system to trap any blow-by. Typically used in high performance vehicles that have higher cylinder pressures.
Since the Piston to cylinder wall is not a perfect seal, combustion gases find their way into the crankcase creating a high pressure which then needs to be vented. Typically these gases have higher than normal hydrocarbons from the combustion chamber and the heated oil in the crank case. To be environmentally conscious, these gases are purged back into the intake manifold and thus burned. These gaseous mixture can burn or become gooey when settling on very hot surfaces like the back of a valve.

In a traditional port injected (fuel) engines, the fuel injectors spray behind the intake valves and essentially 'wash' any hydrocarbon build up and prevent the valves from gumming them up. Typically they build up around the valve seat, and over time, cause improper sealing of the valve to the valve seat on the cylinder head.

In a direct injection engine, like our J35Y6, the high pressure fuel injectors spray directly into the combustion chamber, as opposed to the back of the valves, to increase combustion efficiency and result in better emissions and fuel economy. The by product is the inability to 'adequately' wash the back of the valves. Though the placement of these injectors in the J35Y series is 'claimed' to effectively wash the valves and prevent carbon buildup, The fear among a certain few (like myself) is the possibility of such build up and the resulting issues are not covered by warranty.

Thus, as a preventive measure, I proactively placed a catch can to trap as much of these gases as possible and dump it at every oil change. These get dumped with old oil and recycled.

Point to note is that no officially documented cases have surfaced about these issues surrounding carbon buildup in the J35Y family of engines.
 

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Catch can, is a a device, that is placed between the intake manifold and the PCV system to trap any blow-by. Typically used in high performance vehicles that have higher cylinder pressures.
Since the Piston to cylinder wall is not a perfect seal, combustion gases find their way into the crankcase creating a high pressure which then needs to be vented. Typically these gases have higher than normal hydrocarbons from the combustion chamber and the heated oil in the crank case. To be environmentally conscious, these gases are purged back into the intake manifold and thus burned. These gaseous mixture can burn or become gooey when settling on very hot surfaces like the back of a valve.

In a traditional port injected (fuel) engines, the fuel injectors spray behind the intake valves and essentially 'wash' any hydrocarbon build up and prevent the valves from gumming them up. Typically they build up around the valve seat, and over time, cause improper sealing of the valve to the valve seat on the cylinder head.

In a direct injection engine, like our J35Y6, the high pressure fuel injectors spray directly into the combustion chamber, as opposed to the back of the valves, to increase combustion efficiency and result in better emissions and fuel economy. The by product is the inability to 'adequately' wash the back of the valves. Though the placement of these injectors in the J35Y series is 'claimed' to effectively wash the valves and prevent carbon buildup, The fear among a certain few (like myself) is the possibility of such build up and the resulting issues are not covered by warranty.

Thus, as a preventive measure, I proactively placed a catch can to trap as much of these gases as possible and dump it at every oil change. These get dumped with old oil and recycled.

Point to note is that no officially documented cases have surfaced about these issues surrounding carbon buildup in the J35Y family of engines.
outstanding writing! How much do you capture in your catch can?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
outstanding writing! How much do you capture in your catch can?
approximately 1.7fl-oz

 

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Parts Needed
  • Drain bolt washer 90471-PX4-000 (18mm) – 1 qty
  • Fill bolt washer 94109-20000 (20mm) – 1 qty
  • Level check bolt gasket 90471-59C-000
  • Honda ATF Type 2.0 (08200-9015) – 5 qty (5 quarts total)
What about transmission filter? Why you skip it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What about transmission filter? Why you skip it?
yup, you skip it because it is not recommended.

Even on Honda 5spds, you skip the filter, unless the transmission was poorly maintained by missed fluid changes or if they were operated under extreme temperatures. For the filter to clog up and cause a noticeable issue, the clutch material would be far beyond their designed life manifested by inability to move or slippage.

I have a G1 Ridgeline that I purchased new and have over 243K miles on it. ATF change as recommended, still on factory installed transmission filter.
 

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yup, you skip it because it is not recommended.

Even on Honda 5spds, you skip the filter, unless the transmission was poorly maintained by missed fluid changes or if they were operated under extreme temperatures. For the filter to clog up and cause a noticeable issue, the clutch material would be far beyond their designed life manifested by inability to move or slippage.

I have a G1 Ridgeline that I purchased new and have over 243K miles on it. ATF change as recommended, still on factory installed transmission filter.
Do these transmissions actually have a filter? On all the modern autos I have worked on lately they don’t use an actual filter anymore. What they are calling a “filter “ is just a metal screen that would have no point in changing.
 

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Do these transmissions actually have a filter? On all the modern autos I have worked on lately they don’t use an actual filter anymore. What they are calling a “filter “ is just a metal screen that would have no point in changing.
Yes, its cartridge-type inside transmission.
 
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