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DIY: 2007 Honda Odyssey AC Compressor Replacement

* For those who follow the thread below (AC Clutch), I have posted in that thread that my AC Clutch went out at 37K, then every 12 months, and most recently the AC Clutch burned after 2 months (I am at 80K):

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-2005-2010-odyssey/93901-05-compressor-clutch-troubleshooting-7.html

* After the old compressor (with 80K) came out, I saw PAG oil behind the Stator, so my theory is oil leaked past the Front Seal, dripping down to the mounting area and also the Clutch itself, causing slipping. Once the Clutch slips, it heats up very quickly, causing the rubber to (inside the clutch plate) to burn.

* So time for me to replace the AC Compressor.

* Total Cost:
---> AC Compressor = $255 online
---> AC Recovery/Recharge = $75 + $30
---> PAG Oil = $8.00
---> Total = $368
Hey, Honda dealer quoted $1500, so I save more than $1100!


PARTS:

1. Compressor:

---> 2005-2007 Ody: Denso Compressor 471-1630 (previous version was 471-1629, stick to 471-1630!)

---> 2008-2010 Ody: Denso Compressor 471-1638 or 471-1639 ( +/- VCM)

Comparing with 471-1630, 471-1638 or 471-1639 has about 10 cc less in displacement, maybe this reduces the head pressure and maybe this is why we don't see burned Stator in 2008-2010 models?

Not sure why Honda redesigned the AC compressor half way through the 3rd Generation Ody. Perhaps during VCM operation, there is less power available, thus smaller compressor?

* Surprisingly, the Denso came with new O-rings x 3. I had bought some Honda O-rings, turned out I don’t need them! Anyway:
80871-ST7-000 is 5/8” O-ring for suction side
80872-ST7-000 is 1/2” O-ring for discharge side


2. PAG Oil:

* Use PAG-46 (NG Oil 8). The compressor came with only 50cc of oil, so I added some more, see below.


3. Splash Guard plastic clips:

* Get these as a package deal on ebay for cheap (don't buy them at Honda dealer!):
91501-S04-003, qty = 7
91503-SZ5-003, qty = 10
Ebay sellers typically sell qty = 15 or qty =20 for cheap.


4. Zip Ties in case your splash shield breaks here and there.


5. Some M6 x 1.0 x 16mm bolts, hardware store has this.


6. Optional: Desiccant bag PN 80101-SFE-003 is $40 at dealer, which is a rip-off. Use generic stuff at local autoparts store for $10. The problem with this desiccant bag: it is located on the driver side of the condenser and there is a metal frame below blocking the cap. You simply cannot replace it with the condenser in place, You have to remove the condenser from the car to replace the desiccant bag!
I did not replace my desiccant bag, I can go on with this debate but my system has always been tight with no leak (such as condenser leak or line leak).
Anyway, your choice.


GENERAL NOTES

* If you are new to HVAC, read the guide below from Honda Civic forum to get to know the terminology (compressor, evaporator etc.). Very good review, theory of operation, troubleshooting guide etc.:

Summer A/C Guide, How it Works, and When it Doesn't - Honda-Tech

* Ever wonder how the AC compressor works, here are some nice Videos:




SPEC'S

1- Bolt specs:
* 12-mm mounting bolts 16 ft-lb.
* 10-mm connections at AC Compressor: 7.2 ft-lb.




2- System capacity:

* R134a: 24.7- 26.5 oz

* PAG: 2007-2010: 6 oz. This is the tricky part, Helm manual is confusing the way is written, each component has certain amount of oil.

* ---> So I spoke to the Denso HQ engineers, the bottom line is: 6 oz is for factory dry fit. Oil is only needed at the compressor, anywhere else, it is a nuisance. Once the system is in operation, some oil will stay in the Rear/Front Evaporators, some in the condenser. So during Compressor change, add only 4 oz. Drain the new compressor first, then add only 4 oz to the compressor. See below!


TOOL

Besides the standard tool such as metric socket, screwdriver, you will need these special tools:

* 5.5mm or 7/32-inch socket. You can get this at Sears.

* Feeler Gauges, and AC Clutch Tool (to hold the Clutch still while you remove the 10-mm bolt). I used this to re-adjusted the factory gap from 0.559 mm to 0.300 mm.

* Loctite for 10-mm bolt (I used this as added caution).

* Serpentine Belt Tool

* Eye goggles

* AC Recharge Gauge in case you vacuum/recharge yourself.

* Measuring Cup, don’t use your kitchen stuff, get a new measuring cup for $2.00.

* Empty box for nuts/bolts.

* Ziploc bags and rubber bands to plug the open lines. This is crucial!


OdyACCompressor01.jpg


OdyACCompressor02.jpg



* Note the Relief Valve at the bottom of the compressor, this valve opens when system pressure is above 450 psi (IIRC), this happens when your relay is stuck ON all the time:


OdyACCompressor03.JPG


OdyACCompressor04.JPG


PROCEDURE

* Go to car wash the day before and wash the under chassis beforehand to keep things clean.

* You can buy the vacuum pump for $90, but I don’t do HVAC for a living. For the same money, I got good service from local shop:

* I used “Brake Plus” shop. They say “recovery” vacuum is different from “vacuum” (prior to charging with R134a). Anyway, price by Brake Plus:

* $75 for R134a recovery (they recovered 2.0 lbs out R134a from my system)
* Went home and replaced AC Compressor
* Came back to have system vacuum (30-45 min of vacuum), then R134a added. Cost = $30 for this.

1. Front van up on wood ramps, put in Park. Now turn wheels turned all the way to the Right.

2. Remove Belt. I have J35A6 engine (mechanical tensioner). If you have J35A7 engine, see the Timing Belt thread for info on Hydraulic Tensioner. Anyway, place the tool as shown, leave some room for it to rebound because once the belt is out, the tool will move to the front, hitting the hoses.
* The UPPER Pulley is where you place the 14-mm socket/belt tool.

INSTALL NOTE: Make a diagram of the belt routing for re-installation. Tip: loop the belt around all pulleys, and do the tensioner pulley last. Make sure that the belt fits in ALL grooves when refitting it. Failure to do so may cause the belt to slip and tangle inside the TB compartment, ruining your engine (see forum for that thread).


OdyACCompressor05.jpg


3. Remove splash guard. I spent close to 45 min. fighting with all these stupid plastic clips. In my BMW, the splash guard comes out in 5 min (Phillips screws). These Honda clips are simply dumb design!
Note that Honda uses 2 different types of clips (small and large) for this area.


OdyACCompressor06.jpg


4. Now the Right Fender area is another dumb design. The 10-mm bolt seized, during removal, the nut tab (part of the liner) broke off from the plastic liner! So the bolt is bonded to the broken metal tab. I spent 1h fighting with this bolt. Then I gave up and yanked it to the top. Then during install Zip Ties solved the problems LOL!
- Fold the Plastic Liner to create space to deliver the baby!


OdyACCompressor07.JPG


5. Disconnect both suction and discharge lines (10-mm bolt and 10-mm nut). Immediately cap them with Ziploc bags and rubber bands to keep moisture out.
NOTE: Use new O-rings supplied with compressor.

6. The compressor is mounted by four (4) 12-mm bolts. Wear gloves, and go slow, make sure the socket bite onto the top bolts properly. Do NOT strip the bolt head.
* Compressor is removed via the wheel well area.
* NOTE: disconnect the wiring near the radiator fan. Look at the wiring of the new part, you will see the tab, squeeze the tab, then use a small flat screwdriver the pry the 2 connectors apart. Note that during install, the connector must be fitted to the metal tab on the radiator fan shroud to keep them out of the fan blades! Anyway, observe your factory setup before taking them apart. Sorry no photo for this part but someone can post it later.


OdyACCompressor08.JPG


OdyACCompressor09.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
7. Old compressor had very very small amount of oil (nothing draining out to the cup).
* Either PAG oil leaked out of the front seal (I think this is my case) or the oil is sucked out during Recovery phase (maybe the HVAC guru can chime in).
* The 5.5mm bolt deserves some mentioning! One came out fine. The other one is stripped. After some drilling/pounding with punch/hammer, it came out. So I used the good bolt for the “recessed area”, and a new generic M6 x 1.0 x 16mm bolt for the other area. It worked fine.


OdyACCompressor10.JPG


OdyACCompressor11.JPG


NOTE: Replace the 1/2-inch O-ring on this adaptor. Then transfer it to the new compressor.


OdyACCompressor12.jpg


8. From inspection of old compressor, I saw PAG oil behind the Stator, so this explains the repeated issues I had with the Clutch. Oil leaks out front seal and drips onto the clutch surface, causing slipping ---> burned clutch.


OdyACCompressor13.jpg


9. New compressor came with gap of 0.559 mm, I adjusted it down to 0.300 mm.
NOTE: when insert the feeler gauge, insert gently, do not force t, all you need is to insert it to a depth of about 3 mm


OdyACCompressor14.jpg


10. New compressor only had 50cc! The Denso people told me the new compressor comes with 100cc! The bottom line: do not trust anyone, do your own thing.
See the video below for proper technique (spin the shaft to drain the oil):



NOTE: Clean the measuring cup before draining oil from new compressor. Cleanliness is crucial! Once you drain the new compressor, add 4 oz of PAG-46 oil. Recap the opening (new compressor comes with rubber cap) because during install, debris may fall inside. Only disconnect the cap at the time when you connect the lines to the compressor.


OdyACCompressor15.JPG


INSTALL NOTE

* Make sure you use new O-rings (wet them with PAG Oil).

* Mount the compressor with the 12-mm bolts first, then connect the lines later.

* When you connect the lines to the compressor: pay attention!
Make sure the O-ring fits nice and squarely onto the compressor openings. Then snug the 10-mm bolt or 10-mm nut down. Otherwise, you WILL have a leak later. Follow the torque specs.

* Don’t forget the electrical connector snaps onto the radiator fan shroud. Make sure all wiring is out of the way of the rotating pulley!

* When refitting serpentine belt, read warning above!

* When you go back to the shop for recharge, ask to speak to the tech. Their usual procedure is: they add oil during R134a recharge using data from their computer!
---> Tell them you already have 4 oz of PAG Oil in the compressor. Also during the vacuum process (30-45 min down to 29 inches Hg or so), check to see any oil comes out. Usually a bit (maybe ½ oz) comes out because this is from the condenser). If a bit of oil comes out, you don’t need to add any oil b/c you already have 4 oz sitting in the compressor. If all 4 oz comes out (I doubt it), then you need to add oil.
The bottom line: when it is all said and done, there should be about 6 oz of PAG oil in the entire system.

* Once the system is vacuumed down with no leak, add R134a.

That is it boys and girls...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Some more odds/ends that I thought worth mentioning:

1. Some AC gurus told me it is important that once the system is buttoned up (lines connected but prior to charging with R134a), spin the AC shaft via the Clutch some 10-16 revolutions to distribute oil, and also to prevent oil slugging during the 1st start-up.
I am not sure this is needed, but what the heck, it costs you nothing, why not?

2. Also, some people say to prevent Clutch slipping, burnish after R134a is charged. Just google "Burnish AC Clutch".


Burnishing is the cycling of the clutch to allow a wearing in of the engagement surface area. The reason for burnishing a clutch is to increase the initial starting torque. Most technicians fail to follow this important procedure when replacing a compressor or clutch. An unburnished ac clutch can produce a low torque condition, causing the clutch to slip and thereby fail. When replacing a clutch or compressor & clutch assembly, follow this important burnishing procedure. Run the engine at 1,500 to 2,500 RPM. Using the controls on the dash, cycle the clutch ON and OFF at a rate of 10 to 15 times per minute for a total of 50 cycles minimum. This should bring the clutch up to operating torque capacity.
.
 

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Thank you cnn for another great write-up, I just replaced my compressor following your how-to. :)

I found the compressor on Amazon for $270, and since I have prime I was able to get one-day shipping for $8. A local shop did the system recovery and then vac'd and filled for about $70. Not too bad. :)
 

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Thanks for the write-up cnn!

My stator went bad and I purchased the whole compressor for $220 at rock auto. Originally I thought I would just replace the clutch & stator, but since the van is at 98K, I figured I might as well replace the whole thing. I did have to remove the tensioner assembly (easy 2 bolt removal) to deliver the baby, because the belt pulley was too big.

1 hr @ 25 micron vacuum, 26 oz R134a & 4 oz double end capped PAG-46, and she is good as new. The wife and kids are thankful for A/C now!

Michael
 

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What about the A/C Receiver Drier / Accumulator ? ya'll replacing that too? isn't it a part warranty requirement ?
 

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The source of difficulties was the compressor. cnn never had a line leak; in short, the closed system had not been breached and then spent an extended time with open lines. When he removed the compressor, he immediately capped the line ends. I've done this before, too, on household and automotive systems, and immediately sealing off the line ends prevents moisture inclusion problems.

I've got one of those dessicant bags sitting in my rollaway. It's pretty big and has a lot of "drop" capacity. "Breaking" the lines and then capping them will not allow enough moisture into the system to come even close to saturating that bag.

I'd say it was a good call. Very little gained by performing extra surgery and removing the condenser (disconnect another line) and open up the socket head plug (another opening). The greater risks outweigh the marginal (at best) gain.

This is a good writeup, cnn. Thanks for the videos; I never realized that the A/C compressors use something like swash plate pumps. They look like they function like hydraulic pumps on a big jet aircraft.

OF
 

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The accumulator/drier is likely affected if the compressor fails internally or the system is opened to the atmosphere for a long period of time. If the compressor fails and sends bits of metal downstream, it is going to end up in the accumulator and possibly the condenser. You can flush the condenser, but best just to replace the accumulator. As long as the system has not taken on moisture from being open to the atmosphere, such as when recovering the refrigerant, replacing a component and recharging, it is not mandatory to replace the drier. The desiccant is often soaked in oil, so it is not going to quickly absorb moisture unless it is exposed to the atmosphere for an extended time. It does absorb moisture quickly when the fluid is moving through it during compressor operation.

In my case, I only had the lines open for about 20 minutes while replacing the compressor, and then I pulled a low vacuum for an hour. If you think about it, replacing the desiccant allows it to be open to the atmosphere while you are installing it, and that is likely more exposure than deep inside the system bathed in oil.

If the system has been discharged, recharged, opened etc, there is always some moisture that likely enters and possibly is absorbed by the desiccant. Over time the desiccant's reserve decays, so it is wise to replace it in general, but I don't think it is affected much at all when opening a properly operating system one time.

Michael
 

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I just ordered a new compressor and a new condenser..found a shop that is only going to charge me $325 labor to install both...no warranty though...still less than half of Honda's refurb'd compressor only warrantied offer...rolling the dice...
 

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Thanks for the great post cnn. When getting the mating block off the compressor all 3 of the bolts sheared. I had to re-thread a new hole for the one bolt that sticks way out in your photo. I put everything back together and it was ice cold for a week then all warm air. The pressure was really high in the system for some reason and the pressure relief valve started to go off. I recovered the freon and vacuumed and put freon back in. All warm air. I think I have a leak. Is there any way to get that mating piece for the hoses to the compressor? Or does it sound like the expansion valve is stuck and that is why pressure is building in the system. Anyone's help would be appreciated.
D
 

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CNN...thanks for this great thread.

Quick question for you/forum: Amazon has the whole Denso 471-1630 assembly for $227 (+$20 tax for me in CA). My 2007 EX-L has ~95,000 miles. Is it worth replacing everything?

Seems like the replacement of all will be easier and faster than replacing just the stator/clutch, and those parts alone will cost me about $235 shipped from Majestic. If I replaced all, I would just have to spend the extra $65 with my mechanic for refrigerant recovery/charge (I just did this last week thinking I had a slow leak since the 2nd condenser replacement a month ago...but that's another story...so sunk cost).
 

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Like MWD, I ended up picking up the entire compressor unit for $250 through Amazon...was going to be $245 from Majestic just for the clutch + stator. Things went pretty fast up to two points.
1) It was ridiculous trying to figure out how to get the old compressor out with the belt wheel (?) still attached. I removed a bolt from the tensioner assembly so I could rotate a piece partly out of the way, and after 10 minutes of trying different angles it finally came out. Fortunately, the new one eventually went in very easily.
2) Just like CNN, it was impossible to get the second 5.5mm head bolt off the compressor without drilling it out. Fortunately I have some experience dealing with things like this, but still added at least an hour to my effort this morning (15 min to drill out, 45 min trip to the HW store).

Thanks for all the instructions!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
@JamesInLV,

You made the right decision, I was faced with the same situation of clutch vs new compressor.

Then I saw the post by CandyGram4Mongo re leaking front seal:
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-2005-2010-odyssey/93901-05-compressor-clutch-troubleshooting-13.html

Then it was an easy decision, new Denso compressor is the ticket.

I have had the Denso compressor now for 1 year, works fine.

You easily saved $1000, the Honda dealer wanted $1400 for this job that I did for $350 ($250 for compressor, $100 for evacuation + recharge). Still better than a car payment!
 

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Removal

I followed these steps and was able to remove the compressor without to much issue. Problem I had was that I was unable to remove the compressor via the wheel well. It just will not fit at all! Any suggestions?

I know these directions are for a 2007 Honda Odyssey, I have a 2004 Honda Odyssey, figured it would be the same .

Damon
 

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2004 and 2005-2010 are different generations, so, it is naive to think you can use gen3 instructions for gen2 odyssey.... Ask in appropriate forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Actually, damonlbeaty did not ask a naive question at all.
The 2nd gen forum has no clear instructions for AC Compressor R&R, I linked this DIY AC Compressor for 2nd gen folks so they can use a reference. It is virtually the same procedure between 2nd gen vs 3rd gen procedure.

Back to damonlbeaty question, for 2nd gen procedure, I remember reading somewhere that it needs to come out through the top. So the alternator needs to be removed to deliver the baby through the top.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I followed these steps and was able to remove the compressor without to much issue. Problem I had was that I was unable to remove the compressor via the wheel well. It just will not fit at all! Any suggestions?

I know these directions are for a 2007 Honda Odyssey, I have a 2004 Honda Odyssey, figured it would be the same .

Damon
See the 2nd gen thread posts by sailorbenjamin:

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/24-1999-2004-odyssey/155372-c-compressor-diy-replacement.html
 

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Read that you could also loosen the subframe bolts to make room for removal from the bottom, just cant find out what the subframe bolts are... Anyone know?
 

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To pull it through the wheel well you need to take off the tensioner. Use a breaker bar from on top to loosen it and then remove it. I tried to just undo the bolt on the bottom and move the bottom arm of the tensioner and it will not fit through. Once you remove the tensioner you have just the right amount to pull it through. And replace the receiver/dryer. It is very easy. just remove the clips to the upper bumper, the screws in the wheel wells right in back of the front lights at the seam, then tilt the bumper forward to gain access to the condensor. Don't bother removing the clips on the splash guard. I jjust removed the right wheel well and 2-3 clips on the right splash guard to gain access to everything. Just bend the guard down and out of the way. Good luck. Just did the whole thing this past weekend. Not fun at all but beats the $1500 to have the shop do it.
 
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