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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
DIY: 2007 Honda Odyssey Front Brake Rotor (also Rear Rotor & Shock Absorber Pics)

DIY: 2007 Honda Odyssey Front Brake Rotor

I have warped rotors at 30K miles, so I just re-surfaced them. Anyway, I wrote a quick DIY for those who need it.

NOTE:
- Ideally the van should be cleaned with water the day before so all winter salt, sand are washed off to make the job easier.
- Wheel Nut Size: 22-mm
- Brake Caliper Bracket Mounting Bolts: 19-mm; torque = 101 ft-lb (this torque is a bit on the high side, see my tip later).
- Brake Caliper Sliding Mounting Bolts: 14-mm; torque = 37 ft-lb.

- A Punch Set is also useful because it is very easy to round off these rotor retaining bolts without this tool. Basically this is a punch tool with a “twisting” motion. Place the Phillips #3 head on the rotor screw. Hammer the Punch Tool a few times. This will keep the Phillips head tight on the screw and at the same time the tool unscrews it counter-clockwise (make sure you check the tool before using it. The tool should have “R” and “L” markings on it. Press it down on the ground, the tip should twist CCW: this is what you want). Your local Autoparts store or Sears should carry this tool.

- You need 2 bolts to extract the rotor because it is likely rusted in. If my measurement is correct, then the extractor bolt should be M8 x 1.25 x 25 (M8 = diameter is 8 mm; 1.25 = distance between adjacent threads is 1.25 mm; 25 = length is 25 mm). These bolts are cheap at hardware store.

PROCEDURE:

1. Apply Parking Brake. Loosen wheel nuts but do not remove them yet.

2. Jack up the van, place jackstand under the subframe (where the control arm is attached to the subframe; jackstand under subframe, not under control arm. See pic).

3. Remove wheel and set under the van for added safety. See pic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
PART III

5. Remove the Brake Caliper Bracket 19-mm bolts and hang the caliper using solid electrical wire (or metal coat hanger) to prevent strain on the brake hose.

6. Note the two (2) Rotor Retaining Bolts. They are Phillips #3. Just in case you round it off, local Honda dealer sells these Rotor Retaining Bolts for $1.00/each.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
PART IV

7. Now use the Punch Tool (aka Impact Driver) to remove the two (2) Rotor Retaining Bolts.

8. Then tap the rotor with a rubber hammer, if it comes off then fine. If not, use the extractor bolts (M8 x 1.25 x 25) to remove the rotors.

Now you can bring the rotors to local Autoparts store for re-surfacing if you wish.

Attachment: honda-ody-frontbrake-04.jpg:

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/attachment.php?s=&postid=635835
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
RE-INSTALL TIPS

RE-INSTALL TIPS:
1. Clean mating surfaces before re-installation. Use very fine sand paper to clean it. This means:

a. The surface between the hub and INNER side of the rotor where they mate together.

b. The surface between the OUTER side of the rotor and the INNER side of the wheel where they mate together.

c. The surface between Brake Caliper and Steering Knuckle.

2. I apply a small amount of anti-seize at the hub ring to avoid bonding between the hub and rotor.

3. I apply a small amount of anti-seize at the rotor ring to avoid bonding between the rotor and the wheel.

4. Don't forget small amount of anti-seize on the rotor screws threads.

5. Don’t forget to torque the 19-mm bolts. From a practical standpoint, it is very difficult, if not impossible to fit a torque wrench in the tight space of the wheel well.
What I have done in the last 25 years: tighten the 19-m bolts by hand and the wrench until it stops. Place the 19-mm wrench let’s say at 1 o’clock position. Use a Rubber Hammer and tap the wrench until it sits at 11 o’clock position. Basically 60-degree tightening. This has worked well for me for 25 years.

PS: if you want to change ONLY the brake pads, then: undo the Sliding Caliper 14-mm bolts. Remove the Sliding Caliper. Take 1 minute to study the anatomy, it is very easy. Basically Brake pads held by hardware clips. Removing the pads is very easy.Then using a pair of pliers or C-clamps and gently press the pistons back in (check the brake reservoir to be sure it does not overflow because when you press the pistons in, brake fluid flows back into the brake reservoir!!!).

Check the sliding pin's rubber boot for any tear etc. Install new pads and re-install Sliding Caliper.

Now this is a must: With engine off, gently apply the brake pedal a few times until the pads are in contact with the rotor. Then go for a test drive. WARNING: If you fail to do this step (seating the brake pads), when you drive the car out of the garage, during the first few brake pedal applications, there will be no braking effect at all!

As you can see, changing brake pads is straightforward business.

Then bed the brake per manufacturer recommendation (basically a series of braking from 60 mph to 10 mph etc. Do a google search on "brake bedding").
 

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Awesome! Thanks for taking the time cnn.


Joel
 

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Good job cnn. Have you thought of creating PDFs and posting those v/s this way where you're restricted to the number of attachments and what not? If you create a word document, you can print to PDF using cutePDF a free software. Once PDF is ready, you can email it to me and I can host or like herrhaus is now doing, host it on google docs and just post a url using tinyURL service.

PM me for more details if you're interested in that. If not, this way works fine too. :)

Here is a sample PDF way of instructions (ATF Cooler installation) that was posted by Mel a few years back if you want to see an example PDF.

http://www.ctrout.com/CPI/Ody/ATF1/ATF-CoolerInstallationNotes.pdf its located in : http://www.odyclub.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7617&highlight=Mels
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks dvpatel, I actually already have cutepdf and use it to reduce large pdf from 100 pages to 2-3 pages etc.
I did not realize that you can convert file from Word to Cutepdf file, this is new to me. So thanks for this tip.

Couple things: For those of you who doubt if you need the Punch Tool, you likely do. Some years ago, I rounded off the rotor screws on my 2001 Honda Odyssey (now sold). It took forever to extract these rounded-off screws! Since I got this Punch Tool, it is a breeze!


Another issue I forgot to mention is rotor/pad brand names.

1. Honda OEM Rotor: PN 45251-SHJ-A00 ---> $110 at dealer. I think OEM is "Mountain"Brand but it has a history of warping.
Alternatives:

- I use Autozone Duralast PN 31368 ---> $39/each at Autozone with 2yr-warranty.
I have zero problem with these Autozone rotors.

- ? Brembo

- ? ATE

- ? Pilenga

- ? PBR (made in China) seems to have problems from what I gather.


2. Honda OEM Pad: PN 45022-SHJ-A50 ---> $55 at dealer.
Alternatives:

- ? Akebono

- ? Autozone Duralast
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
REAR Rotor & Shock Absorber Pic

I also took a pic of the REAR Rotor area for those who need to do REAR Brake Job or Shock Absorber.

Search the forum for the proper torque values.

NOTE:
1. Shock Absorber UPPER Nut and Bolt: 14-mm.

2. Shock Absorber LOWER Nut: 17-mm.

3. Brake Caliper Mounting Bolt: 17-mm.

4. Brake Sliding Caliper Bolt: 12-mm.

PS: Same #3 Phillips Rotor Screws.
 

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Thanks for the DIY steps

Awesome DIY. Did mine today. Took me 3hrs including the run to the car shop for rotor turning (about an hour). I was having the steering wheel shake when braking at speeds of 65-70mph. I still have life on my original brake pads but decided to change the pads since I'm having the rotors turned. Am using Duralist Gold CMAX from Autozone. Will take it for a spin and find out if this fixed the shake.
 

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I find it interesting that the rear rotors are larger in diameter than the front ones.

Does this contribute to early warping? Why would Honda do that?:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: Thanks for the DIY steps

amignaci said:
Awesome DIY. Did mine today. Took me 3hrs including the run to the car shop for rotor turning (about an hour). I was having the steering wheel shake when braking at speeds of 65-70mph. I still have life on my original brake pads but decided to change the pads since I'm having the rotors turned. Am using Duralist Gold CMAX from Autozone. Will take it for a spin and find out if this fixed the shake.
IS the shake better after rotor resurfacing?
 

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Re: RE-INSTALL TIPS

cnn said:
What I have done in the last 25 years: tighten the 19-m bolts by hand and the wrench until it stops. Place the 19-mm wrench let’s say at 1 o’clock position. Use a Rubber Hammer and tap the wrench until it sits at 11 o’clock position. Basically 60-degree tightening. This has worked well for me for 25 years.
[/B]
I was trying to figure out how do you get 60 degrees by going from 1 OC to 11 OC. Then I realized that you must mean going the short way, not all the way around the clock face :D Basically you give it slightly less than a quarter turn of extra tightening.

Here is what I would add to your DYI.
1. open your brake reservoir by removing the cap. You need to let air escape while compressing caliper. Good time to put a towel around it, in case you miss fluid spilling out. Brake fluid fill ruin your paint in no time.
2. I always remove sliding pins and rubber boots. Clean them out, then apply synthetic grease and reassemble, making sure they slide with ease.
3. Clean brake hardware with Brake cleaner and wire brush.
I clean the caliper, caliper bracket and the rotor, but especially metal inserts that let pads slide laterally. You can easily pop them out of the caliper bracket. When I first remove them, they look all gonked up, little brake cleaner and wire brush action makes them look brand new and shiny. You can also just buy new brake hardware kit.
4. Buy brake pad anti-squeal compound from your favorite auto parts store. It costs between $1-3. Apply to the back of the pads before installing them.
5. Another tip, is that when I remove brake hardware, I have two containers, one for upper bolts and hardware and one for lower. That way, everything goes back to the right place.

good luck,
Max
 

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Taking the reservoir cap off for an extended period and letting air into the brake fluid reservoir is not recommended as brake fluid will absorb air and then make your brake pedal feel mushy.

If you haven't added any brake fluid, then it shouldn't overflow - so no need to open it.

Best time to bleed the brakes and put in new brake fluid is after a brake pad change so your fresh all the way around.

My 2 cents...
 
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