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Discussion Starter #1
2007 Honda Odyssey Spark Plug

I wrote a DIY for my 2001 Honda Odyssey Spark Plug here. You can go through that thread to get some background info:
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=31689

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The 2007 Honda Odyssey is similar in principle but there are minor differences.

1- Spark Plug is NGK IZFR5K-11 (about $10/each online as of Nov. 2010).
- More information can be obtained from NGK website:
http://ngksparkplugs.com
http://ngksparkplugs.com/docs/tech/design_symbols_plugs.pdf

- Basically “I” is Iridium and “11” is the gap of 0.044”.
- If you check the gap, be very careful NOT to damage the Iridium tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Part II

2- Tools needed:
- Torque Wrench
- 6” extension
- 3” extension
- Short Flat Screwdriver
- 5/8” Spark Plug Socket
- 6-mm Allen key (not shown)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Part III

3- Remove Plastic Cover:
- Turn the Front knobs counter-clockwise ¼ turn.
- Lift the Rear of Plastic Cover upward, it is held by 2 knobs at the rear.
- Then set the Plastic Cover aside away from the car to avoid accidentally stepping over it:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Part IV

4- Squeeze the Upper part of the Spark Plug Connector and remove the Connector.
- If you run into problem, then use the short Flat Screwdriver but gently pry the connector away from the Ignition Coil. Be careful NOT to damage the connector when prying it!
- Using the 6-mm Allen key, remove the bolt holding the Ignition Coil.
- When re-installing, the torque for this 6-mm Allen bolt is 8.7 lb-ft (basically tighten until it stops, then using 1 finger and give it a tug and that is it).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Part V

5- At 40K miles, the Factory Spark Plug still has a gap of 0.044”: which is the original specifications!
- The reason I remove them is for checking and also for applying anti-seize to prevent the spark plug from seizing into the engine if left in there too long!
- Notice that I apply a small dab of anti-seize on the Spark Plug’s threads. Do NOT let the anti-seize touch the Iridium tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Part VI

6- When installing Front Spark Plugs, because of tight space:
- Insert the Spark Plug + Socket together using Left Hand.
- Then attach the 6” extension using Right Hand.
- Then insert into the hole.
- Gently turn it Counter-Clockwise a few times to prevent cross-threading.
- Then turn it Clockwise by hand (do NOT use ratchet at this time to prevent cross-threading).
- Then torque to 18-22 lb-ft.
 

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Part VII

7- I notice that at Factory, Honda applied a thin smear of grease at the very tip of the Spark Plug Rubber Boot. So I apply a thin smear of grease to keep moisture out:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Part VIII

8- The Rear 3 spark plugs are a bit more challenging. The mirror shows their positions.
Also, no space for Torque wrench so you have to tighten them by feel.
By the time you finished the Front 3 Spark Plugs, you already have a good feel for 18-22 lb-ft.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Part IX

9- For the Rear Spark Plugs, I use a “garden knee pad” on top of the engine so my elbows can rest on it.
 

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Part X

10- The Rear Spark Plug at the driver’s side presents unique challenge because of the tight space.
- Drop the Spark Plug Socket in the hole first.
- Then insert the 6” extension.
- Then turn Counter-Clockwise and remove the extension-socket combination.
- There will be no room to pull this whole extension-socket combination because of the tight space next to the firewall.
- As soon as the socket is visible, disconnect the socket from the 6” extension, then drop the socket back down in the hole. Now insert the 3” extension and pull the spark plug out.


Congratulations on a job well-done!!!....:)
 

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Why are you changing them at 40K? They can go twice that easily and still probably too soon. Seems rather expensive for no gain other than piece of mind, but not sure even that is valid as there is no risk at 40K that you avoiding to have piece of mind. hmmm
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
dagmando said:
Why are you changing them at 40K? They can go twice that easily and still probably too soon. Seems rather expensive for no gain other than piece of mind, but not sure even that is valid as there is no risk at 40K that you avoiding to have piece of mind. hmmm
I did not changing them at 40K. I already mentioned my reasoning in Step 5 above.

I took the spark plugs out for:

1. Inspection

2. Applying anti-seize to prevent seizing with time.
A spark plug left too long in an engine can bond with the engine.
In fact, when removing the spark plugs, I could hear the metal-to-metal screeching sound!

3. For a Write-up for forum members.
 

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Thanks very much for the pics and the detailed write-up! It helps to have a good reference and especially all the tools needed at hand to make the job go easy!
 

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Good write up, but I have a few comments:

Do not adjust the gap of iridium tip plugs. If the gap is out of specification, replace them.

Torque spec is 13 lbf•ft (18 N•m), not 18-22 lb-ft as you listed.

The grease applied to the inside of the ignition coil boot is dielectric grease. It prevents entry of moisture and also prevents corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
EE4Life said:
Do not adjust the gap of iridium tip plugs. If the gap is out of specification, replace them.

Torque spec is 13 lbf•ft (18 N•m), not 18-22 lb-ft as you listed.

The grease applied to the inside of the ignition coil boot is dielectric grease. It prevents entry of moisture and also prevents corrosion.
Thanks for the input. W.r.t. to your points:

1. I have adjusted Iridium plugs before in other cars. The key thing is not to touch the Iridium tip with the adjustment tool.
The reason mfg's do not recommend adjusting Iridium plugs is that: some people may damage the Iridium tip.

2. Torque per Honda service manual is as you said 13 lb-ft, but read on to the next thread.

3. Personally, I never pay attention to dielectric grease in 25 years of wrenching (I never care for it). I have used wheel-bearing grease at battery terminal and spark plug boot in 25 years, zero problems.
If people have dieletric grease in the shop, by all means use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #17
For those who wonder what torque is necessary to strip the cylinderhead spark plug hole's thread. This fellow from the Ford Forum did this experiment using a junk engine. Read this for fun:

http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1000090-tested-for-the-breaking-point-on-the-early-4-spark-plug-thread-heads.html#post9424574

QUOTE:
I used a scrap Ford 2001 MY PI 2V V10 head with good threads to test the breaking point of the plug threads that are so weak according to many people on this forum.

I did four plugs, two with antiseize and two dry.
I started with the correct torque and worked up.

At 55 ft lbs it felt like the threads were just starting to stretch.

From 55 to 85 I got about 1-1/2 turns more out of them, and it did not feel good.

Two of the plugs snaped off flush with the heads just shy of 100 ft lbs, after anouther 3/4 turns from 85 ft lbs. One was dry and one had anti seize.

The third plug broke right at of 100, 5/8s of a turn after 85 ft lbs. This one had anti seize.

The forth made it to 115 ft lbs, 1/8 turn past 100 ft lbs (7/8s of a turn passed 85 ft lbs) and snaped. This was a dry plug.

Every one of them the plug broke, I never striped the threads out of the heads like I though I would.
 

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CNN, that post above is awesome!

In my experience, it's cross threading that gets people...not over-torquing.
 

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kudos to cnn for the detailed, easy-to-follow instructions. was searching for instructions to change the plugs on a 2006 odyssey, this is exactly what i needed!

will go to advance auto parts, they have the ngk 3657 plugs for $12.49, but they have a coupon for $30 off $75 (added an air freshener to make the $75), and the total cost for 6 is $46.

one question though - in place of a torque wrench, is there a way to install these with a regular wrench, and not over- or under-tighten the plugs?

thanks.
 

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Re torque for Spark Plugs. I took the data from NGK website:
Spark Plug Installation Instructions

Flat seat type (with gasket), 14-mm ---> 18.0~21.6 lb-ft

Conical seat type (without gasket), 14-mm ---> 7.2~14.5


To me, NGK IZFR5K-11 looks like Flat Seat Type Spark Plug and therefore I use 18 lb-ft.

Here is the pic of the Flat Seat type:
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/attachment.php?s=&postid=637746
I didn't have a torque wrench, so I gave it my best educated guess - not too tight, not too loose.

One thing that DID freak me out at first, until I realized what was happening - as the plug was tightened almost to the end, when it hit the washer, it felt tight, THEN it 'gave' some more, as the washer was being compressed - for a second, it felt like I tightened it too much and was now stripped, but as it seated itself, it was good.
 
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