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Hello all, I am a bit of a DIY er so I thought I would put together a short DIY video on how to disable the Honda VCM "feature" for a 2005 5o 2010 Odyssey.Most of

the research I did was based on content that is in this conversation on the Honda Odyssey web site. https://www.odyclub.com/threads/vcm-a-better-way-to-disable.234113/
This is a good resource to understand the development of the VCMuzzler. https://www.piloteers.org/threads/vcm-disable-a-new-and-better-way.70873/ VCM FAQ . https://www.odyclub.com/threads/vcmuzzler-ii-for-disabling-vcm-faqs.268778/
If you dont want to do this DIY you can purchase an easily installable kit for a small amount hear. https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Honda-Acura-VCM-Disable-Kit-Pilot-Accord-Ridgeline-Odyssey-Muzzle-Delete-3-5L-/173827018067?oid=171729581043
 

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Thanks for doing and posting your video. I just watched it. I have two suggestions for improvement. You should mention the big issues with VCM and why disabling it is necessary.That It causes piston ring failure, misfires, excessive oil consumption and premature failure of engine mounts. My second suggestion is to mention that VCM is only on the EX-L and Touring models of Odyssey.
 

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....My second suggestion is to mention that VCM is only on the EX-L and Touring models of Odyssey.
Vehicles equipped with VCM
 

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All the Odysseys after 2011 have VCM.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for doing and posting your video. I just watched it. I have two suggestions for improvement. You should mention the big issues with VCM and why disabling it is necessary.That It causes piston ring failure, misfires, excessive oil consumption and premature failure of engine mounts. My second suggestion is to mention that VCM is only on the EX-L and Touring models of Odyssey.
good idea to put it in the video. Not sure I will get around to adding it but I will post up in the comments what parmm posted so people can see the other models.
 

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My concern with this and the Muzzler in general is, it's not clear if this sensor it utilized by other systems (e.g. fuel mix ratio) and if there is any effect on them. I know the approach is to get just enough resistance to fool the computer to thinking the temperature is just below the threshold that keeps the VCM from engaging. I have found that ambient temperature and engine workload played a significant part. So you're either constantly changing or dialing in different resistances, having the value to always be far below the threshold, or allowing that sometimes the VCM might engage, even if only momentarily. Considering it is no minor process to disengage half the pistons, I wonder if there might be another approach, something to simply disconnect that is specific to only the VCM. Is this simple? Yes. Have I found it to be without issue? No. I did have to go up to 100 ohms to ensure the VCM stays off, but that might change come summer. And I don't know if it is overkill and if that might be having detrimental effect to the engine.
 

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Your concerns are unfounded. There are new muzzler devices that are fool proof and there are no ill effects from muzzling VCM in this manner. Consequences would be far worse to not disable VCM. I have the original 82 ohm VCM muzzler device and my VCM has never come on as far as I can tell.
 

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There are other ways to disable VCM - the problem is that they all immediately throw a Check Engine light. Manipulating the output of ECT1 is the only known way to do it without chucking a code.

The O2 sensors are the primary means of determining air/fuel mixture. They, along with the PCM, generally work to keep the AFR as efficient as possible.

There are times when it's necessary to intentionally allow a very rich fuel mixture, such as a cold engine start. When you turn the key in the ignition, the PCM is programmed to dump a bunch of fuel into the engine and ignore the O2 sensors (whose readouts would normally cause the PCM to flag the inefficiency and try to correct it) just long enough to get the engine started and running smoothly. As soon as the PCM determines that the engine has successfully started and is running, it starts listening to the O2 sensors again to maintain as efficient an air/fuel ratio as possible.

The engine computer does not continue to dump extra fuel into the engine until the coolant reaches a certain temperature. This has been observed and verified by OBD II scanners reading real-time fuel trim and AFR data (including on my own 2015 Ody).

There is absolutely no evidence I am aware of that muzzling VCM causes mechanical problems over the long term. If there were, God knows we would have heard about it here by now. People come to forums like this when troubles arise and never hesitate to piss and moan and wail about every little affliction their van suffers. We've heard nothing. Muzzling VCM only prevents problems.
 

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thscott and Cromath, so then if I have to go to say, 120ohms to get the VCM to stop engaging, this won't be a problem? I have plenty of resistors, found a seller on eBay that selles various sizes in packs of 10 reasonably priced, and use electrical connectors so I can swap them out easy.
 

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thscott and Cromath, so then if I have to go to say, 120ohms to get the VCM to stop engaging, this won't be a problem? I have plenty of resistors, found a seller on eBay that selles various sizes in packs of 10 reasonably priced, and use electrical connectors so I can swap them out easy.
It's possible to force the reported coolant temperature too low - that will cause a Check Engine light and corresponding trouble code. But given that you would know where the trouble lies and understand that there isn't a "real" mechanical problem, you can back off the resistance, clear the code and you're back in business.

If you're planning on having a variety of resistors, why not consider a Max Muzzler from @maxud. It has a potentiometer that makes fine tuning the resistance a breeze. Easier than swapping for sure.
 

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VCMTuner II seems to be the one most highly recommended here of late.
It is, but at $125 USD, no one who is looking at doing it DIY for $25-35 is going to be interested in going that way.

If a person didn't want to step up to the price point of the S-VCM controller or VCMTuner II, the Max Muzzler is a great choice at a more palatable price.
 

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If you want a VCMuzzler II, you'll get a better price by messaging @verbatim on Odyclub. You can avoid eBay's fees that way. Similarly, if you are looking for a Max Muzzler, send a message to @maxud here as well.
 

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It's possible to force the reported coolant temperature too low - that will cause a Check Engine light and corresponding trouble code. But given that you would know where the trouble lies and understand that there isn't a "real" mechanical problem, you can back off the resistance, clear the code and you're back in business.

If you're planning on having a variety of resistors, why not consider a Max Muzzler from @maxud. It has a potentiometer that makes fine tuning the resistance a breeze. Easier than swapping for sure.
I believe it is actually fooling the computer to think it is cooler than it is.
 

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I believe it is actually fooling the computer to think it is cooler than it is.
Yes. It's important to distinguish between the actual coolant temperature and the reported coolant temperature. Any VCM disable device does nothing to the actual coolant temperature; it only modifies what gets reported to the PCM, in effect fooling the PCM into thinking the coolant is cooler than it really is.

The ECT1 sensor is a NTC thermistor, so its electrical resistance decreases as its temperature increases. So by inserting an extra resistor between the sensor and the PCM, we artificially raise the resistance in the circuit which the PCM interprets as a cooler temperature. The higher the resistance, the lower the reported temperature from ECT1. But because it's possible to have too much of a good thing here, if the resistance gets too high, the PCM thinks that the coolant is staying too cold and it throws a code. So we try to adjust the resistance so that the PCM sees a coolant temperature high enough to not trigger a warning but low enough to prevent VCM activation.
 

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[QUOTE = "CroMath, сообщение: 2360647, участник: 742841»]
Да. Важно различать фактическую температуру охлаждающей жидкости и указанную температуру охлаждающей жидкости. Любое отключающее устройство VCM не влияет на фактическую температуру охлаждающей жидкости; это только изменяет то, что сообщается PCM, фактически вводя PCM в заблуждение, думая, что охлаждающая жидкость круче, чем она есть на самом деле.

Датчик ECT1 представляет собой термистор NTC, поэтому его электрическое сопротивление уменьшается при повышении температуры. Таким образом, вставив дополнительный резистор между датчиком и PCM, мы искусственно повышаем сопротивление в цепи, которую PCM интерпретирует как более низкую температуру. Чем выше сопротивление, тем ниже сообщаемая температура от ECT1. Но поскольку здесь можно получить слишком много хорошего, если сопротивление становится слишком высоким, PCM считает, что охлаждающая жидкость остается слишком холодной, и выдает код. Поэтому мы пытаемся отрегулировать сопротивление таким образом, чтобы PCM видел температуру охлаждающей жидкости достаточно высокой, чтобы не вызывать предупреждение, но достаточно низкой, чтобы предотвратить активацию VCM.
[/ QUOTE]
82oM
 

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[QUOTE = "CroMath, сообщение: 2360647, участник: 742841»]
Да. Важно различать фактическую температуру охлаждающей жидкости и указанную температуру охлаждающей жидкости. Любое отключающее устройство VCM не влияет на фактическую температуру охлаждающей жидкости; это только изменяет то, что сообщается PCM, фактически вводя PCM в заблуждение, думая, что охлаждающая жидкость круче, чем она есть на самом деле.

Датчик ECT1 представляет собой термистор NTC, поэтому его электрическое сопротивление уменьшается при повышении температуры. Таким образом, вставив дополнительный резистор между датчиком и PCM, мы искусственно повышаем сопротивление в цепи, которую PCM интерпретирует как более низкую температуру. Чем выше сопротивление, тем ниже сообщаемая температура от ECT1. Но поскольку здесь можно получить слишком много хорошего, если сопротивление становится слишком высоким, PCM считает, что охлаждающая жидкость остается слишком холодной, и выдает код. Поэтому мы пытаемся отрегулировать сопротивление таким образом, чтобы PCM видел температуру охлаждающей жидкости достаточно высокой, чтобы не вызывать предупреждение, но достаточно низкой, чтобы предотвратить активацию VCM.
[/ QUOTE]
82oM
"The ECT1 sensor is an NTC thermistor, so its electrical resistance decreases with increasing temperature. Thus, inserting an additional resistor between the sensor and PCM, we artificially increase the resistance in the circuit, which PCM interprets as a lower temperature. The higher the resistance, the lower the reported temperature from ECT1. But since you can get too much good here if the resistance gets too high, PCM considers that the coolant stays too cold and issues a code. Therefore, we are trying to adjust the resistance so that the PCM sees the temperature of the coolant high enough not to cause a warning, but low enough to prevent the activation of the VCM."
 

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To each his / her own, but I'm not a fan of this DIY approach. I don't like the idea of cutting into the wiring harness and or that it would not be easy to undo for maintenance procedures or easy to change the resistance if needed (ECO light starts coming back on or codes are thrown for too low of a temperature).

After 1 year and 15K miles I have no complaints with the VCMTUNER II and really like that I could just install and forget about it knowing that it will automatically disable itself to account for maintenance procedures and I will know right away should there be an overheating condition with my van.
 
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