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This question is for all you 2001 Odyssey owners who have crossed the 200K miles milestone. I have a 2001 Odyssey EX with about 185K miles; I am the original owner. I have kept the van well maintained, and it has been pretty reliable over the years. I have primarily used the local Honda dealer for maintenance (mainly because of convenience - it's 5 minutes from where I work). The only major issues I've had were with the EGR valve and catalytic converted (long story, but Honda reimbursed me for most of the cost) and of course, the transmission. The transmission went at 138K miles and after negotiating with American Honda and the dealer, Honda replaced the transmission (3 year/36K miles warranty) but I had to pay $2500.

So now I have this 11 year old van, which really runs like a new car, and am torn as to whether I should invest money for maintenance items as it approaches the 200K mileage milestone, or put that money towards a new car (I drive between 15 - 18K miles/year). The van needs the following major maintenance items: tires, brakes (front and rear), timing belt (and other belts), water pump, spark plugs, coolant system flush (and hoses).

I've never kept a car for this may miles (this is my first Honda; I always had Toyotas before) and I'm concerned about investing a lot of money in the van at this point. A major breakdown/repair could be right around the corner...

What has been the experience for those of you who've kept your 2001 Odyssey beyond 200K miles? Has it been reliable for years thereafter? Thanks for your feedback! Jeff
 

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UUee! That's probably $3500 worth of maintenance at the dealer, plus the tires.That would certainly put me over the top
on getting a new one, even on my van and it's only got 132K. Mine hasn't been so trouble-free though.
 

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My '01 is just getting to 160k, and since I like working with a wrench, I tend to think I'll take this thing to at least 350k. I just replaced the brakes (all parts but the master cylinder and front calipers, which I did rebuild). I'll likely need some of the stuff you've mentioned, but it's certainly going to be cheaper to rebuild the van as time goes along and get more miles out of it. At least that's how I'm thinking on my freelance musician's budget! I do have to say, it's tempting to purchase a second, smaller car for my long commutes that don't involve carrying timpani in the back. My vote is stick with it - I love my Odyssey, and anyway, we have our own theme song...
 

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I guess it depends on what you really want. My Ody is 10 years old and the kids have grown up now with one already gone, another about to leave after this summer and the last one is a freshman in high school. I really don't need to keep it and would like to downgrade into something smaller and more fuel efficient. Gas prices are climbing again.:(
 

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My 2001 Ody has 205K. It gets a lot of use - about 19-20K per year. I actually just changed the timing belt for the first time at 192K. I have done the EGR port clog fix and replaced the EGR itself - these are DIY and quite simple. I also need new tires and will do the brakes this spring / summer.

Most of the things that you talk of are pretty standard and really, if you have had the timing belt and water pump done once already, you could put that off - those are the big cost ones. I would encourage you to investigate options for servicing other than the dealer that are more cost favorable for you or try your hand at DIY - Sparkplugs are a nice easy DIY and are cheap.

In my van - runs great, very slight whine under acceleration. We talk about keeping it for 15 years and 300K and even beyond that to up to 20 years. Really, if the van is running well and serving your needs, I would encourage you to keep it as long as you can. Lower vehicle taxes, insurance also support keeping an older vehicle running as long as it is meeting your needs. The main risk is some sort of catastrophic failure that would end the life of the van and for the most part the risk there seems to be the tranny and you are familiar with that and in fact you can recover from it. Really, keeping the fluids changed as needed, you should be able to get 15 years out of the van and maybe more.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all of your replies. I really would like to keep the van and maybe, I can just forgo having to do the timing belt and water pump and just see how long the van lasts. I always thought the 105K interval for the timing belt was probably conservative, but it seems that some folks have gone way past that point. How long can one reasonably expect out of the timing belt/water pump? Also, I've never changed the power steering or brake fluid (that has been recommended to me a few times, but thought it was a scam)...and lastly, I have been using a local shop lately and so, does the tranny fluid replacement need to be Honda ATF? Can a shop generic ATF be used instead, or should i still go to Honda for the tranny fluid change? Thank you all - you have been very responsive and very helpful!
 

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I have heard that timing belt failures are mostly heat related. So if you take long trips and/or drive in hot weater, you probably should change it at the recommended interval.
Flushing PS is easy and a scam if they charge alot. Just suck out as much fluid as you can with an oven baster or or hand pump then top up the fluid again.
The brakes is another story. Replacing the ABS control unit is expensive. Plus water gets into the fluid and makes your brake system gradually go bad.
 

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Once a cars projected annual maintenance cost gets to 75% of the cost of a new car payment, over the course of a year, I move on. Think brakes tires timing belt regular maintenance. Rust also needs to be factored in.
 

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mine has 207 on it, and i drive it alot! I know it needs motor mounts, a timing belt this year, and probably new struts. If the interior is in very good condition, and it runs as well as you say it does,
dude, whats the problem putting wear and tear maintenance into it? $1500 a year for upkeep is still way cheaper than $400 a month payments on a new one. If my tranny went tomorrow, Id repair it
and keep driving.
 

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I agree with the last two posts. I would do the timing belt and water pump....regardless of cost, considering that a failed belt will cost you a valve job and an engine repair that far exceeds the 600-700 timing belt job. I don't know what you have as a downpayment on a new vehicle but a new Odyssey (mid level) costing in the range of 35,000 will run you $700 per month without a downpayment......That's $8400 per year.
 

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I wouldn't put a ton of money into it due to (a) it's age (b) it's mileage, and (c) you never know how long the tranny will last. I'd keep driving it until it dies. If you're lucky, that'll be a long time.

My Mercedes is 23 years old and not worth much money so I'm going to drive it until it dies. I try to fix/maintain it myself, it hasn't been to a mechanic in 4 years. I buy the least expensive after-market parts on the internet.

Brake pads for the Odyssey are easy to change out and the rotors are plenty thick so you don't need to worry about those. Spark plugs are about $10 each but aren't difficult to change. You don't need to go to the dealer, find an independent mechanic that'll do necessary work cheaper.
 
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