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Discussion Starter #1
My 2002 Odyssey is dragging it's brakes and I have replaced the caliper, but the problem remains. I've cleaned and greased bolts and anything I can think of that could have friction. I tested the caliper off the bracket and the piston comes out and resets itself when the brake pedal is depressed. But when I mount it back on the bracket the caliper piston doesn't seem to want to reset. I've looked for pinched hoses and can't find anything. I've bled the brakes already so that's not the issue.
 

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So when you say it's dragging the brakes, could you be more specific - when you have the wheel back on and try to rotate it by hand, does it not want to rotate, or does it rotate and you hear the sound of the pads sliding on the rotor? If it's the former, then there's an issue - if it's the latter, that's normal.

I would avoid pressing the brake pedal with the caliper not over the rotor - you can pop the pistons out and make a mess with brake fluid. Put the caliper back on the car over the new pads and the rotor, then bleed the system and reinstall the wheel - next, have someone press the brake pedal and while you try to rotate the wheel.
 

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So when you say it's dragging the brakes, could you be more specific - when you have the wheel back on and try to rotate it by hand, does it not want to rotate, or does it rotate and you hear the sound of the pads sliding on the rotor? If it's the former, then there's an issue - if it's the latter, that's normal.

I would avoid pressing the brake pedal with the caliper not over the rotor - you can pop the pistons out and make a mess with brake fluid. Put the caliper back on the car over the new pads and the rotor, then bleed the system and reinstall the wheel - next, have someone press the brake pedal and while you try to rotate the wheel.
By dragging I mean when I spin the wheel the dragging caliper side spins for 6 seconds before stopping. The other side in the rear spins for 16 seconds before stopping. The piston will compress the brake pads when the caliper is pushed, but it will not release as the brake pedal is released.

The weird thing is that I looked at the piston carefully when the brake pedal was pushed and released and I could see the piston pushing and then releasing, but it seems to not release far enough.
 

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My 2002 Odyssey is dragging it's brakes and I have replaced the caliper, but the problem remains. I've cleaned and greased bolts and anything I can think of that could have friction.
Does this mean that you have cleaned the old grease off the pins upon which the caliper body slides? And then re-lubricate them with special high temp disk brake caliper grease? Did you also clean and check for holes in the rubber boots that shield the caliper pins?

Why did you even *have* to clean and grease the new, replacement caliper?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Does this mean that you have cleaned the old grease off the pins upon which the caliper body slides? And then re-lubricate them with special high temp disk brake caliper grease? Did you also clean and check for holes in the rubber boots that shield the caliper pins?

Why did you even *have* to clean and grease the new, replacement caliper?
I tried both the new caliper guide pins and the old ones. The new ones were tight and high temperature grease didn't help so I cleaned out the hole and place the ones from the bad caliper in that slide a little better. Holes in the rubber boot aren't a big issue unless the pin is sliding right?
 

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I tried both the new caliper guide pins and the old ones. The new ones were tight and high temperature grease didn't help so I cleaned out the hole and place the ones from the bad caliper in that slide a little better. Holes in the rubber boot aren't a big issue unless the pin is sliding right?
The pins are supposed to move/slide in the caliper carrier. The pins are free floating. The boot retains the grease and protects it from dirt. The pin hole is a blind hole. Too much grease in the hole can cause hydraulic lock and prevent or hinder the pin from complete travel in the hole. Old, dried up grease will also hinder the travel of the pin. Are you holding the pin with one wrench while you torque the flange bolt with another wrench to 27 ft-lbs? Did you install the pad retainers and shims?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The pins are supposed to move/slide in the caliper carrier. The pins are free floating. The boot retains the grease and protects it from dirt. The pin hole is a blind hole. Too much grease in the hole can cause hydraulic lock and prevent or hinder the pin from complete travel in the hole. Old, dried up grease will also hinder the travel of the pin. Are you holding the pin with one wrench while you torque the flange bolt with another wrench to 27 ft-lbs? Did you install the pad retainers and shims?
I think we are talking about different pins? I'm talking about the caliper guide pins which go in just by pushing them in. I torqued the bolts that hold the caliper to its bracket at 27 ft/lbs as instructed by the manual.

I also noticed that one of the guide pins has a sort of rubber fitting on the end that makes it fit tighter in the hole.
 

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I'm presuming this is rear brakes from your reply above.

Have you checked to see if the e-brake is causing the drag? If it's set too tight, it can cause the drag you are experiencing.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm presuming this is rear brakes from your reply above.

Have you checked to see if the e-brake is causing the drag? If it's set too tight, it can cause the drag you are experiencing.

Brian
DEfinitely not the eBrake. The wheel spins fine with the caliper removed and the eBrake off.
 

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I think we are talking about different pins? I'm talking about the caliper guide pins which go in just by pushing them in. I torqued the bolts that hold the caliper to its bracket at 27 ft/lbs as instructed by the manual.

I also noticed that one of the guide pins has a sort of rubber fitting on the end that makes it fit tighter in the hole.
Rear brakes, 2002. The *caliper bracket* (the part that holds the brake pads) is fastened to the backing plate with two bolts (19) torqued to 41 ft-lbs. The upper and lower guide pins (10 & 12) are different and they fit into holes in the caliper bracket and are held there only by a rubber boot. Each pin has a rubber boot and this is all that holds it onto the bracket.

Each free floating pin (10 & 12) has flats on the end in order to accommodate a wrench in order to hold it while you torque the flange nuts (15) that attach the *caliper Body* (the part that contains the hydraulically activated piston) to the guide pins, to 27 ft lbs.

*Both* pins should be protected by a rubber boot; the upper pin is different from the lower pin; each pin has a threaded hole in the end; because the pins are free floating, you have to keep them from rotating with an open-end wrench while you torque the flange bolts that attach the caliper body to the guide pins.

It is not clear from your messages that you observed and followed all this. Let us know.

 

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... the caliper piston doesn't seem to want to reset....
Not sure what you mean here - the piston isn't sprung - it won't retract when you stop pushing the pedal - the hydraulic system works by either applying pressure or not - so the pads are either firmly pressed against the rotor, or they are gliding along the surface (if they did pull back, you'd hear a clunk every time you pushed the pedal and slapped the pads into the rotor - the only time that happens is with worn wheel bearings where the pads can get pushed back (it's called knockback, and it's not a good thing)) - Here's something to try - put a tube on the bleeder and bleed the caliper so that the tube is full of fluid - leave the tube on (keep it tucked out of the way) put the wheel back on and spin it and see if it spins the way you want it to - by having the bleeder screw open, you know there is no hydraulic pressure being applied to the caliper pistons

are these new pads? have both sides been bedded properly and have a couple hundred miles on them? there could easily be a slight difference in the coefficient of friction between the two sides for new pads, and that could be causing the difference...

It really sounds like things are fine - are there any other symptoms? abnormal heat buildup on that wheel? car pulls to one side when you brake? increased noise while you are driving?
 
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