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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday I replaced the rear pads on my EX-L.

What a PITA!

I have done disc brake pads numerous times on other vehicles. It is usually very straight forward and easy. But these &#%$^[email protected]# things....

Maybe it was the made in china cheapo pads I used, but WTF is with the tightness. I eventually got them in after copious amounts of swearing, cleaning, lubing.

I was almost to the point of throwing out the spring clips. They'd be loose and fit, but at least they'd be in.

Has anyone taken them to a grinding wheel to get the end tabs of the pads to fit?

This whole episode had me wishing I had a base level Ody with rear drums. Drums can be a PITA to do as well, but my experience has been that they typically last forever.

Seems like pretty near everything is rear disc these days.

Why?

I understand that they have better performance, but, its a minivan, not a high performance sports car.

My question is to those that have owned rear drum equipped Odys. Did you ever find yourself thinking, "damn, I wish I had rear drums"?
 

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I never touched the rear drum brakes on my '99, But I did replace the disc brake pads on my '96 and '02. I had no problems with the Auto Zone lifetime warranty pads.
Did you perchance review the sticky thread REAR Brake Shoes & Lubrication Tips & Tricks ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I read a few pages through it, but it seemed to be for drum only.

Is there info for discs?
 

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I wish my ‘99 rear brakes was not drum brakes.

What exactly is the problem you are having? Removing the old brake pads? If you live in the rust belt, some rust build up should be expected.

I too love Autozone free brake pads/shoes replacement warranty. On all my vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The old pads come out fine. It was getting the new pads in. The tabs on each end of the pad don't want to slide into the slots.

I removed/cleaned the clips a few times. I eventually went back to the old clips as they seemed to stay in place better. Next time I may just take a grinding wheel to these tabs to get them to fit better.
 

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I've installed many aftermarket pads in older cars where OEM pads are not available. I find it common to use a file to shave off paint or even a tad of metal to make the pads fit into the caliper. Make sure the caliper is clean and any rust is removed where the pads mount. And then if the pads still won't fit you may need to work with the pads to make them fit. The main problem I've found is thick paint on the mounting tabs.
 

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This whole episode had me wishing I had a base level Ody with rear drums. Drums can be a PITA to do as well, but my experience has been that they typically last forever.
True that.

Rear discs are generally more troublesome than drums due to their greater exposure to road spray (e.g. seized calipers, etc.)

However discs look better behind the alloy wheels that most cars have today.

I admit that I was thrilled that I waited for the 2002 Ody, the first year they had rear discs, for the better appearance.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't think it is so much a matter of looking better as it is a matter of showing off to others that you have an upscale car with 4 wheel disc brakes.

30 years ago 4WD was the sign of something upscale. Today, rear drums are the sign of something being bottom of the barrel entry level.

I think this is a shame.

As we know, drum brakes are very well protected and typically last much longer than discs. I also believe they are less prone to dragging, which is typically the reason for premature wear with discs.
 
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