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Discussion Starter #1
I've done a search on DRL fogs but most were for the previous gen and links within were broken. I have a 2011 Canadian Touring that uses the high beams as DRLs. I've pulled the DRL fuse #27 under the driver's dash to disable it. has anyone with this generation been able to reroute/Mod the DRL to the factory fogs?
 

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Based on the diagrams, (for the 2014-2017, but should be the same for the 2011-2013) there is no way to separate the DRL and High Beam wiring. The DRLs are controlled with a PWM module inside the fuse/relay box next to the ECU (passenger rear corner) that also directly powers the high beams - there is no external relay, dropping resistor, etc. that could be used to separate the two functions.

-Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Based on the diagrams, (for the 2014-2017, but should be the same for the 2011-2013) there is no way to separate the DRL and High Beam wiring. The DRLs are controlled with a PWM module inside the fuse/relay box next to the ECU (passenger rear corner) that also directly powers the high beams - there is no external relay, dropping resistor, etc. that could be used to separate the two functions.

-Charlie
As is with the DRL fuse removed. the high beam still functions normally. Flash to pass works and so does the high beam function with low beams on, so the DRL module must be a separate source of power to the high beam.

I wonder if if I put a spade into the power side of the empty DRL fuse and run that wire to the fogs it might work? it would just be a pain to go through the firewall.
 

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Which fuse number is the DRL fuse, which fuse box?

-Charlie
 

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Will you be changing out the factory fogs to lights that were designed to be DRLs? Here in the US, the fog lights can only be legally on if the vehicles headlights (and tail lights) are on at the same time. The DRLs, which are actually at a lower output than regular headlights can be legally lit by themselves, but are turned off when the other front lights are lit (either parking lights or headlights).

My other vehicle, a 2016 Soul, did not come with factory DRLs (although in Canada they do, actually they are mandated), so I installed a Philips LED DRL kit that has a circuit which prevents the DRLs to be on when the headlights or parking lights are on. The lines of the Soul's front worked well with the light set. There are probably aftermarket DRL kits that would blend better with the Odyssey and possibly fit in the factory fog locations--won't be plug and play though, but it shouldn't be too much effort to run the requisite wiring to the fog location.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Will you be changing out the factory fogs to lights that were designed to be DRLs? Here in the US, the fog lights can only be legally on if the vehicles headlights (and tail lights) are on at the same time. The DRLs, which are actually at a lower output than regular headlights can be legally lit by themselves, but are turned off when the other front lights are lit (either parking lights or headlights).

My other vehicle, a 2016 Soul, did not come with factory DRLs (although in Canada they do, actually they are mandated), so I installed a Philips LED DRL kit that has a circuit which prevents the DRLs to be on when the headlights or parking lights are on. The lines of the Soul's front worked well with the light set. There are probably aftermarket DRL kits that would blend better with the Odyssey and possibly fit in the factory fog locations--won't be plug and play though, but it shouldn't be too much effort to run the requisite wiring to the fog location.
No i am not planning to change them out although if i did i would consider the philips DRLs you mentioned. Might have been your post or someone eleses but it looked good installed. As far as i know fogs can be used as drls. I see a ton of audis and other makes here with fogs as DRLs and they came factory like that. Pre led strip era of course. Right now its not required for tail lights to come on with Drls but i just read that will change in 2021.
 

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Why disable the DRL?
 

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Fuse #27 driver side under dash. Only present in Canadian models.
Looks like the setup is the same on the US models, though I can't be 100% sure (it is on the diagrams, and it doesn't specify US vs. CAN for that section - and I'm not near the van at the moment).

Here's a description from the diagrams:

Daytime Running Lights (DRL)
The DRL circuit is composed of the control circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box), the DRL Indicator, the left and right headlights(high beam), the left and right HID unit (high beam)(HID), the parking brake switch, the relay circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box). The DRL circuit operates with the ignition switch in ON (II), the headlights off (headlight switch in OFF or in PARKING position), and the parking brake released. When the DRL circuit is on, the control circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box) and the relay circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box) activate the DRL control circuits on and off (duty cycle), which provides a reduced voltage (approximately 6-8 volts) to the high beam headlights. This reduced voltage causes the high beam headlights to come on with a reduced brightness. The DRL Indicator also illuminates.
NOTES:
• The DRL circuit is disabled when the ignition switch is turned to OFF (0). To keep the DRL circuit from coming on, apply the parking brake while the ignition switch is in OFF (0). When the ignition switch is turned back to ON (II), the DRL circuit will not come on until the parking brake is released.
• The headlights revert back to normal operation when the headlight switch is moved to the ON position


The key bit there is "duty cycle" - meaning PWM, and thus no dropping resistor or separation of the high beam circuit from the DRL circuit.

-Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Looks like the setup is the same on the US models, though I can't be 100% sure (it is on the diagrams, and it doesn't specify US vs. CAN for that section - and I'm not near the van at the moment).

Here's a description from the diagrams:

Daytime Running Lights (DRL)
The DRL circuit is composed of the control circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box), the DRL Indicator, the left and right headlights(high beam), the left and right HID unit (high beam)(HID), the parking brake switch, the relay circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box). The DRL circuit operates with the ignition switch in ON (II), the headlights off (headlight switch in OFF or in PARKING position), and the parking brake released. When the DRL circuit is on, the control circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box) and the relay circuit board in the relay control module (in the under-hood fuse/relay box) activate the DRL control circuits on and off (duty cycle), which provides a reduced voltage (approximately 6-8 volts) to the high beam headlights. This reduced voltage causes the high beam headlights to come on with a reduced brightness. The DRL Indicator also illuminates.
NOTES:
• The DRL circuit is disabled when the ignition switch is turned to OFF (0). To keep the DRL circuit from coming on, apply the parking brake while the ignition switch is in OFF (0). When the ignition switch is turned back to ON (II), the DRL circuit will not come on until the parking brake is released.
• The headlights revert back to normal operation when the headlight switch is moved to the ON position


The key bit there is "duty cycle" - meaning PWM, and thus no dropping resistor or separation of the high beam circuit from the DRL circuit.

-Charlie
can you post a pic of that diagram? you're probably right as i have seen some posters from the states mention fuse 27 so its probably not an only Canadian model. When I said separate circuit i should have said separate power source.
 

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Here's the page:



Basically, the box that is labelled the "Relay Circuit Board" will contain some sort of PWM controller for the high beams - but notice there is no other connection or bypass (with a relay like the low beams) otherwise. The old school dropping resistor setup is gone (not sure how it was on earlier Hondas, but that's what Toyota and Subaru did years ago).

-Charlie
 

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"High beam DRL can blind other road users. Using high beams for DRL is very stupid and should not be allowed. "

That's your story and you are sticking to that????
 

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High beam DRL can blind other road users. Using high beams for DRL is very stupid and should not be allowed.
You do understand that they are at 1/4 power of full brightness, during the day, right? They also have the right beam spread to be seen from a far enough distance to do what they are supposed to do (reduce collisions by increasing vehicle visibility).

In my non-DRL vehicles, I often drive with my headlights on in situations where there is oncoming traffic (country roads, etc.).

-Charlie
 

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Thanks for setting that straight Charlie
 

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High beam DRL can blind other road users. Using high beams for DRL is very stupid and should not be allowed.
Most vehicles on the road now use the high beam filaments in the headlights for DRL by design--they are energized at 1/4th normal highbeam current and therefore have 1/4th (roughly) the output and are not nearly as bright as highbeams would be with the headlights on.

Oops--just saw Charlie's reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Here's the page:



Basically, the box that is labelled the "Relay Circuit Board" will contain some sort of PWM controller for the high beams - but notice there is no other connection or bypass (with a relay like the low beams) otherwise. The old school dropping resistor setup is gone (not sure how it was on earlier Hondas, but that's what Toyota and Subaru did years ago).

-Charlie
Thanks for posting that Charlie. I dont know how that relay circuit board works and i just did a voltage measurement at fuse 27 with ignition on only and after with low beam on. No change in voltage which means my original idea of using it wouldnt work.
 

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No change in voltage which means my original idea of using it wouldnt work.
Yeah, the DRL fuse is powered when the engine is ON at all times. The CANBUS connection is how the Control and Relay boards in the fuse box know when to turn on Low, High and DRL beams. You'd have to snoop the CANBUS and trigger functions off that to add functionality...

-Charlie
 

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You do understand that they are at 1/4 power of full brightness, during the day, right? They also have the right beam spread to be seen from a far enough distance to do what they are supposed to do (reduce collisions by increasing vehicle visibility).

In my non-DRL vehicles, I often drive with my headlights on in situations where there is oncoming traffic (country roads, etc.).

-Charlie
Yes I do know that. But low power doesn't change the lights aim. High beams are aim high enough to shine right in other road users eyes. GM did/does the same thing and it was a bad idea when they started and it still is.
 
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