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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to share this with my new friends here in Odyclub.

This is something I learned from my brother. We both work on our own cars and we like testing new ways of doing things.

Well, this is a big thumbs up for me. I used it during my last brake fluid change. This also worked great instead of using a turkey baster. However, it does require a compressor bigger than a four gallon. I used my 10 gallon and it did find.

The end that goes into brake nipple does come off. I left it on thought. As for draining the Power Steering reserviour, I removed the black end of the hose. It does come off easily.

The fluid reservoir, well, watch out for it. It did well for me. I made sure it would replenish the brake reservoir as I bled the brakes. For the first time, I did not need my kid to help with the brake bleeding process.

For me it was well worth the money. BMW has a brake bleeder, waste of money. This one is a keeper. Oh, if you don't like it, the store will take returns. Im sure you will give this thumbs up. Check it out.

Brake Fluid Bleeder

HarborFreight.com
ITEM # 92924 MANUFACTURER: CENTRAL PNEUMATIC

Cheers...
 

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arielb1,

That is not new, it basically uses suction to suck the fluid out. It is OK, but at $26, it is just a suction pump.

I use my air compressor (the same air compressor for tires) for all my cars, I wrote it up here for my BMW and Honda. The key thing is:
- Make your own brake cap (see instructions, very very easy)
- Keep air pressure below 15 psi.

With this trick, bleeding is very very easy, nothing to clean up after the job is done.

Honda, see post #12, 13, 14, 15, 16::
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-2005-2010-odyssey/63890-brake-reservoir-cap-pressure-bleeder.html

BMW:
DIY: 1-man Hydraulic Bleeding Kit for those with Air Compressor! - bimmerfest - BMW Forums
 

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I've tried a few: MityVac, Vacula and others. But you can't beat: Amazon.com: Motion Pro Hydraulic Brake Bleeder - --/--: Automotive for simplicity and ease of use.

IMG_0426.jpg

IMG_0427.jpg

It's just a simple check valve, but it makes brake or clutch bleeding a one-man job without setting up additional equipment.

I use the MityVac to empty the reservoir, fill with new fluid, put the bleeder on the appropriate bleed valve and open the valve, apply the brake pedal a few times to cycle new fluid to the caliper, close the bleed valve and move the bleeder to the next wheel. I'll top off the reservoir a couple of times during the process.

Cycle Gadgets just discontinued the Motrax version of the bleeders. I picked up several more since they're on sale.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've tried a few: MityVac, Vacula and others. But you can't beat: Amazon.com: Motion Pro Hydraulic Brake Bleeder - --/--: Automotive for simplicity and ease of use.

View attachment 8589

View attachment 8590

It's just a simple check valve, but it makes brake or clutch bleeding a one-man job without setting up additional equipment.

I use the MityVac to empty the reservoir, fill with new fluid, put the bleeder on the appropriate bleed valve and open the valve, apply the brake pedal a few times to cycle new fluid to the caliper, close the bleed valve and move the bleeder to the next wheel. I'll top off the reservoir a couple of times during the process.

Cycle Gadgets just discontinued the Motrax version of the bleeders. I picked up several more since they're on sale.
Hansong,

Very nice gadget. So, one end goes to the bleeder valve, the other into a collection bottle. Open the valve, pump brakes until clear fluid comes out then close. How do you know when the fluid is clear if you are the one pumping the brakes? I guess you can see it through the tubing? Does the small black clamp keep the hose on the bleeder valve? I'm skeptical the clamp keeps the air from getting into the caliper. Otherwise, I love this idea. I just don't understand how they can charge so much, but hey, if it works, Im all over it. Less storage to boot. Im going to wait and see what other ideas I can find, but I really like this. Hansong, how many times have you used this? Any issues?

Ariel
 

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"I'm skeptical the clamp keeps the air from getting into the caliper. "

I share your scepticism. In fact, I think it's the bleeder that keeps air from entering the caliper, not the hose clamp.
 

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Here is instruction manual for it:
http://www.motionpro.com/documents/pdf/ar833_I08-0143 .pdf

"To ensure proper operation of this tool, it is necessary to prime it. To do this, position the tool vertically and begin to
depress the lever/pedal, making sure to close the bleeder screw when pressure is not applied, repeat until brake
fluid is seen in the outlet hose."

The above is instructions on how to prime the hose; it seems to require 1 person to press the pedal and 1 person to turn the bleeder screw to prevent air from being sucked into the system.
So initially, you would need 2 people.
 

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Interesting.

I've always bought the Motrax Little Bleeder, rather than the Motion Pro, but they're the same thing with a little ball bearing on top of a spring to make the check valve.

No mention of "priming" on the Motrax instructions, and I've used the things on my cars and motorcycles for the past ten years or so. As soon as you start pushing fluid out of the bleed nipple you've "primed" the check valve, for what that's worth. With only a short length of tubing between the nipple and the valve, it doesn't take much of a push on the brake pedal to get fluid to the check valve.

And if you use clear tubing it's easy enough to tell when you've gotten the old fluid out of the line. It is a one-man job after all :coolio:.

IMG_0428.jpg

IMG_0429.jpg

IMG_0430.jpg
 

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I tried the MityVac and didn't like it and it made me think any kind of suction from the bleeding valve will lose quite a bit of pressure because of the air from the bleeding valve threads (when opened). If you use the check valve type, pressing down the pedal will push out the fluid but when you let go of it, doesn't it suck the air back to your system through the threads of the opened bleeding valve?

I think the best type of bleeding is to pressurised from the resevoir end but the location and the type of cap of the Ody (or other Japanese cars) make it much more complicated. I bought the adaptor kit from Motive for my Motive bleeding tool and it didn't work well at all, very poor design (metal link strap the cap to the bottom of the resevoir).
 

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I've tried a few: MityVac, Vacula and others. But you can't beat: Amazon.com: Motion Pro Hydraulic Brake Bleeder - --/--: Automotive for simplicity and ease of use.

View attachment 8589

View attachment 8590

It's just a simple check valve, but it makes brake or clutch bleeding a one-man job without setting up additional equipment.

I use the MityVac to empty the reservoir, fill with new fluid, put the bleeder on the appropriate bleed valve and open the valve, apply the brake pedal a few times to cycle new fluid to the caliper, close the bleed valve and move the bleeder to the next wheel. I'll top off the reservoir a couple of times during the process.

Cycle Gadgets just discontinued the Motrax version of the bleeders. I picked up several more since they're on sale.
I wanted to bleed the brakes on my 2008 Ody van b/c it had soft brake feel.
I bought this tool (Motion Pro Hydraulic Brake Bleeder, Part # 08-0143) from ebay for about $20 including shipping.
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0143/

I can confirm that the tool works just fine.
The tool allows me to bleed the brake by myself.
The provided instruction was simple to follow.
I had to remove the wheel to get to the bleed screw.
I used a 10 mm box wrench to loosen the bleed screw.
It took 7 or 8 pumps for the brake fluid level to drop from MAX to almost MIN,
so I would pump 6 times, then refill to MAX.
I put a piece of wood under the brake pedal to make sure I don't push the pedal to the floor.
The way I did it: It took about 4 minutes per wheel (Fill, pump, Fill, pump).

Now the brakes feel firmer. I'll monitor to see if the brakes will go soft again which indicates air is getting into the brake line from somewhere.

Thanks Hansong for pointing out an inexpensive tool.

I couldn't wash the internal part of the cylinder. I wonder if corrosion will render the tool useless the next time I need to use it again.

Did anyone have any issue with the tool's long term usage ?
 

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You can unscrew the Motrax/Motion Pro bleeder if you want to clean it. Don't lose the spring or ball! Or, if you have a suction device, suck some oil though it without disassembly. I don't usually bother either way.
 

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