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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our 02 Odyssey has 142,000 miles on it and I have not changed the spark plugs. Runs perfectly. While it would be inconvenient to have them go bad on a long trip, my main concern is having one or more seize on me. Apart from that, I'm really happy to stick with the originals until I start noticing symptoms.

Has anyone actually had to deal with a seized plug ON AN ODYSSEY? If so, at what mileage?

If I heard some reliable stories about seized plugs in Odysseys, I might change my ways....but probably not until then.

Thanks.
 

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I just changed the plugs in both my Ody and Accord. They were both past 110k neither of them showed any signs of seizing. The NGK plugs are coated to help prevent it. I used anti-seize on the new plugs but probably didn't need to. Another 105k I probably won't have the cars at that point. I got my plugs off ebay for $5 a piece, they were $10 at local auto stores. My plugs also looked perfect making me think I could have easily gone much longer. I have noticed no real increase in mileage or performance by changing the plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Our mileage has been the same since we bought the car new.....16 or 17 around town, maybe 22 on the highway.
 

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I haven't done plugs in the Ody yet but all other aluminum head motors I do it with a warm vs cold or hot motor. Apply antisieze on the new ones going in. Depending upon head design I will hit the spark plug well with a shot of compressed air to blow out any debris after removing the coilbpack but before removing the old plug. No sense in dropping a bunch of crud into the cylinder. If you don't have an air compressor or a refillable air bubble a couple of cans of computer compressed air cleaner might work for you.
 

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I did the plugs on the Ody at 96k and none of the plugs were hard to take off. Takes all of 30 minutes.
 

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When changing plugs in Aluminum heads I always work on a cold engine. Any heat will increase the likelihood of thread issues. Russ
 

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I changed my spark plugs at about 110K miles. I didn't have any problem with seized spark plugs. I put anti-seize compound on the plugs and used a torque-wrench to tighten them.

At about 200K miles, I decided to change the spark plugs (had some issues which I thought might be related to spark plugs). Five out of the six plugs came out fine. The last one (rear passenger side) did not want to budge. Being afraid to cause any damage, I just left the spark plug in. The ones I removed looked OK.

Maybe I was unlucky on the sixth spark plug. None of the others were very difficult to remove. I'm guessing the one I left in will work fine for awhile.
 

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***snip*** Five out of the six plugs came out fine. The last one (rear passenger side) did not want to budge. Being afraid to cause any damage, I just left the spark plug in. The ones I removed looked OK.

Maybe I was unlucky on the sixth spark plug. None of the others were very difficult to remove. I'm guessing the one I left in will work fine for awhile.
That stuck plug will only get more stubborn the longer you leave it. Spray it with Quick Freeze and then try again to remove it. Quik-Freeze
 

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Getting new ones back in isn't the issues, making sure the old ones come out without crossthreading is your biggest concern. I cross-threaded one about 14 years back. . . a real headache. Mechanic had to install an insert with new threads. I would:

1. Blow out any debris after removing coilpack, very thoroughly, as suggested.
2. Use a long-handled ratchet or either a breaker bar over your ratchet.
3. Keep your socket extension as parallel with the plug as possible while removing.
4. Turn very slowly, even when it loosens up, to minimize the chances of cross-threading.
5. Always reinstall new plugs with antiseize.
6. For the last year I've been satisfied with Denso irridium (sp?) plugs.
 

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gurtljb, I agree with all your suggestions. However, what can make spark plus removal difficult is actually galling. It occurs when parts seize after being joined for a long period of time.

Cross-threading is when the male threads don't align with the female. This can occur when spark plugs are installed incorrectly.
 
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