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Discussion Starter #1
Good day to all..i would like to ask help regarding tranny leaks. First question is How to replace this seal in transmission where the intermediate drive shaft axle goes in ..and second question is what is the Part number or size of the Seal that needs to be replace.i appreciate any help and opinions..:) Attached are the pictures i took and my bad i took the picture after i cleaned it, so there is no visible leak on the pics.
 

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How skilled are you?


I have a similar leak with slightly wet transmission casing but no ATF on the garage floor. So I am waiting until it gets worse and do te whole thing (at that time, maybe the CV Boots new renewal etc.).

For parts, see:
Honda Automotive Parts

Look under section called "AT Torque Converter Case". Ask Honda dealer to be sure because the seals are different for the (R) side vs (L) side.

This job requires some effort...

1. To undo the 36-mm nut, you need a 1/2" breaker bar and a 4-foot section of iron pipe with I.D. = 1".

2. Puller to push axle inward.
 

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You need to replace the axle seal - you remove the axle and intermediate shaft (can take it out as a unit), pull out the old seal, insert the replacement, and reinstall the axle. You'll need a new axle nut as well as the oil seal - you'll also want to drain the transmission fluid (the 3+ qts which you remove for a normal change interval). (the seal itself comes out fairly easily (access is what makes it a pain) then the new one can be pushed in with your fingers - you want the edge of the seal flush with the case uniformly all the way around it's circumference)


edit - I post too slow! Also - looking at the bernardi site, I think the p/n is 91206-P0Z-005 for the oil seal on the passenger side (it's 91205-P0X-005 on the driver side)
 

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...91206-P0Z-005 for the oil seal on the passenger side (it's 91205-P0X-005 on the driver side)
The trick about using Majestic Honda online website is to look under:
"AT Torque Converter Case"
"AT Transmission Case"


Seems correct, you can also check the PNs at (click under "Interchange"):

SKF Online Parts Catalog


(R) Seal 91206-P0Z-005 ---> SKF 13439
(L) Seal 91205-P0X-005 ---> SKF 15669
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thank you guys for the great help..for the instructions stated on how to do it and the PN. Im not skilled on this but budget is kinnda tight right now so i have no choice but to do it by myself.i just have to follow the instructions you guys provided. Good luck to me.Again thank you very much..
 

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thank you guys for the great help..for the instructions stated on how to do it and the PN. Im not skilled on this but budget is kinnda tight right now so i have no choice but to do it by myself.i just have to follow the instructions you guys provided. Good luck to me.Again thank you very much..
No problem,

Make sure you know the difference between floor jack and jackstand!

Since you are tight on budget, you can tackle this yourself.
Use only Honda parts.

I have not seen a good DIY for the Honda Odyssey but the principle is the same for any FWD.


1- I just replaced the CV Boot on my 1998 Volvo V70, look at post from Oct 9, 2011 in this thread, you will see all the tools you need, especially the iron pipe:
http://www.matthewsvolvosite.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=29716


2- Honda Accord Axle Removal:


3- In your case, it is the seal, so replace the seal. There are 2 ways people remove the seal:
a. Screwdriver but be very careful
b. Two (2) sheet metal screws into the existing seal (measure it is dead center on the seal so you don't damage the bore and/or axle) to extract, search google for picture.


4- You should consider replacing the CV Boots while you are there too:
 

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Alignment is recommended since the knuckle was disconnected. However, this is not absolutely needed, only recommended.

I don't know your skill level, but this is not the job for novice because it is somewhat tricky and if you are not careful can get injured or even killed (if the van is not properly supported). In terms of difficulty, it is probably a 6/10, with 10 being engine rebuild skills.

The van needs to be properly supported on jack stands etc. etc.

- If the trans casing is wet and there is no ATF dripping on your garage floor, live with it for now.
I have the same issue and am just watching the ATF level.

- If there is ATF on the garage floor, then this needs to be fixed.

Best is to ask someone who has done it before to come and help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
tnx cnn for the advices..i just finished the work..everything went well..youre right the difficult part is removing the axle.but removing the seal and putting it is not that hard.Yes i did put support under it.its for safety. hydraulic jack needs back up. I also change the Tranny Fluid.Totally flushed.i followed the write up on how to do it from the forum.So tomorrow i have to test drive it to see if there still leak.and hoping for positive result. Thank you guys..Odyclub the best.
 

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Below is an Axle DIY from a 1999 Honda Odyssey, it is virtually the same as the 3rd gen Ody. You will find all tips/tricks there:

http://www.happywrenching.com/honda/odyssey/honda-odyssey-half-shaft-replacement-axle-removal-and-installation.html


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Axle seals should be easily removable this tool
Amazon.com: Lisle 56750 Seal Puller: Automotive[/ATTACH]
Actually I have that tool, but to be honest with you, I have not used that tool for 15 years: it is clumsy and sometimes it works, sometimes it does not (every engine is different, space is different).


However, there is a trick that works all the time: an awl (or sharp nail) and sheet metal screws!

- Use an awl (or sharp nail) to punch a small hole in the seal. It must be dead center. Just gently tap the awl with a hammer, don't use force, all you care is making a small hole for the screws to go in.

- Then insert the screws as shown, taking care to make sure the screws go in straight.
When in doubt, look at the new seal, study it and you will get it.

- Then grab the screws with a pair of pliers, the seal will come out.

- Simple, easy like 1-2-3.

- However: before removing the old seal (assuming this is factory setup and the seal has not been changed before), make note (take pictures), and mark with Sharpie the seal's existing location! You do not want to drive the new seal in too far, it will leak! When driving in new seal, go very very slow and keep checking all around to be sure it goes in evenly.

- I just used the sheet metal screws technique on my 1998 Volvo Rear Cam Seal, here is picture to show the sheet metal screws trick:

VolvoCamSeal02.jpg
 

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Below is an Axle DIY from a 1999 Honda Odyssey, it is virtually the same as the 3rd gen Ody. You will find all tips/tricks there:

Honda Odyssey Axle Replacement | Happy Wrenching


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Actually I have that tool, but to be honest with you, I have not used that tool for 15 years: it is clumsy and sometimes it works, sometimes it does not (every engine is different, space is different).
Cnn,
this tool should work great for an axle seal, because the inner hole will not be blocked.

For cam and crank seals, I agree the tool will not work. I bought a different one, which works, also from Lisle.
seal.jpg

As far as the screws trick, I have used it the very first time I replaced cam and crank seals, and while doable,
it was far too time consuming and prone to disaster outcome.

If you ever worked on VWs, they actually make specific seal remover tools, which are based on the same concept (two screws),
but the tool is a template that fits perfect over the camshaft and drills holes precisely, so there is no chance of scoring camshaft.

Like you, I am just sharing my own experience here.
thanks
Max
 

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Update for those who want to know...

I have been monitoring my slow leak from the R axle seal (as "weerwolf25" had above), I place a cardboard on the garage floor to monitor the leak.
Basically 1-2 drops per day, then it stopped!

As it turns out, if the ATF level is at Min mark, it does not leak.
So:
- With engine COLD in the morning, pull ATF dipstick, mine reads 1mm below the Min mark, so I will leave it there, no need to top up.
- With engine HOT (after a run to the grocery store etc.), the dipstick reads betwen Min and Max.

So I might have overfilled the ATF a bit.

Anyway, just pass this trick along for those who don't want to change the axle seal. Keep the level at Min for a COLD engine.
 

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My 2008 Ody is at 47400 miles.
While changing the engine oil today, I saw wetness on the axle on the passenger side. The driver side axle was dry.
The wetness was at the point the axle connected to the engine (passenger side axle).
CV boot was dry on passenger side.

I have never seen any oil drop on floor so the seepage must be minor.

I did have to top off both ATF and engine oil over the past 9 months but never thought the decreased oil level was due to a leak.

I am curious about a few things:

1) Do you know if my van is leaking ATF or engine oil. I tried to smell the oil to see if it was ATF, but I couldn't tell for sure.

2) Is it too early for this type of seal to leak at 47 K miles ?
My previous older Honda Accord would leak after reaching 10 years/90K miles.

3) My van is CPO. The non drive train warranty already expired, but the drive train warranty is still good.
Is this leaking seal part of the drive train ? In other words, is the leak repair covered by drive train warranty ?

TIA.
 

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txn,

I agree with you, most axle seals leak at 10y/100K time frame, not at 30K-40K.
Anyway, my leak is very very minor, all I see is a bit wetness at the bottom of the transmission.
I placed a cardboard (taped to garage floor) in my garage and onitor the leak. Maybe 1-2 drops per week, something I can live with.

Best is wait until 90K-100K, then at that time, you need to renew the OUTER CV Boot (and maybe Inner CV Boot) anyway (most Outer CV Boots cracks at that mileage of 90K-100K), then replace the seal at that time.
 

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So what's a fair estimate to have a shop work on it?
I have an '06 Odyssey with 125k miles. My tranny case has been wet for about a year. But just recently started dripping on the garage. I changed the tranny fluid recently and now the faucet has been cranked open. Now I've got pooling...

Thinking seals plus CV boots. Prolly cheaper just to buy the axles with boots than to replace just boots, right?

I don't have the time to do this work (sick and spring vacation coming up for kids) so I need to just take it to a shop. Just wondering if it's worth going to dealer or local friendly mechanic and about what the labor and parts might look like.
 

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Update for those who want to know...

I have been monitoring my slow leak from the R axle seal (as "weerwolf25" had above), I place a cardboard on the garage floor to monitor the leak.
Basically 1-2 drops per day, then it stopped!

As it turns out, if the ATF level is at Min mark, it does not leak.
So:
  • With engine COLD in the morning, pull ATF dipstick, mine reads 1mm below the Min mark, so I will leave it there, no need to top up.
  • With engine HOT (after a run to the grocery store etc.), the dipstick reads betwen Min and Max.
So I might have overfilled the ATF a bit.

Anyway, just pass this trick along for those who don't want to change the axle seal. Keep the level at Min for a COLD engine.
was this permanent?
 
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