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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2008 EX-L with about 200k miles. The power steering pump was noisy, so I thought I would replace it. I jacked up the car, took the wheel off, put a 19 mm six point socket on the 1/2" ratchet and turned counter clockwise. I felt the belt move a bit and then snap the socket came off, and there was the cast aluminum piece on the floor. I didn't think the socket was misaligned, as I replaced the timing belt myself on the this car at 120 k. Okay I can see how bad this looks. How bad is this really and how can I get the belt off, if that is possible? I might try a chain/strap wrench after I calm down.

I appreciate any help anyone can give, this has never happened before.
 

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Cut old belt, remove broken tensioner, install new tensioner, install new belt.
There is not much else you can do.
 

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Not sure what broke on you but isn't there another place on the auto tensioner to put your socket to relieve the tension? I always remove the belt from the top.
 

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Not sure what broke on you but isn't there another place on the auto tensioner to put your socket to relieve the tension? I always remove the belt from the top.
He is talking about piece of aluminum casting made for a socket to fit in.
Actually yes, no need to cut belt, he can use upper pulley bolt for the same purpose he used broken piece.
Stupid me, I did not think about this )

Just looked at the pictures of the tensioner, upper pulley doesnt have a normal bolt, so it will be difficult to operate this tensioner with casting piece broken off.
Especially resetting this tensioner will be hard, and without resetting the main mounting bolt will snap, that happened a lot.
 

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The auto tensioner should look like this:



You can see two "dummy" hex bolts where you can put your socket. I always use the upper one. Maybe I'm missing something but it sounds like he broke the lower one.
 

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The auto tensioner should look like this:



You can see two "dummy" hex bolts where you can put your socket. I always use the upper one. Maybe I'm missing something but it sounds like he broke the lower one.
Right, I did not notice the lower hex.. There is actually two of them. Then yes, OP should not have any problem removing belt.

My J35A6 has spring loaded tensioner, its quite different. There I just grab upper pulley bolt, to release serp belt.
 

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lol, am I too late to say that tensioner has two hex position to de-tension the pulley?
All the easy questions are answered already.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks!

Right, I did not notice the lower hex.. There is actually two of them. Then yes, OP should not have any problem removing belt.

My J35A6 has spring loaded tensioner, its quite different. There I just grab upper pulley bolt, to release serp belt.
Wow, that upper tensioner bolt must be well hidden, thank you for that, I've never seen the upper bolt. You guys saved me, thanks alot.

You do turn it counter clockwise, if my memory is right?

Thanks again, y'all rock!
 

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It's important to go slow as the tensioner is hydraulic. You put some pressure on it and wait a bit before it starts moving. If you just muscle it you have a chance of breaking it or damaging the hydraulic piston assembly.
 

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Our serpentine belt fell off several months ago due to a failure with the crankshaft pulley. For some reason, we were not able to put the serpentine belt back using the top tensioner bolt and we broke it off by using too much force. We had to use the bottom bolt to change the the serpentine belt. Have anyone ran into this? No matter how much force and how long, we pushed toward the back of the van, the belt did not give much slack. Thanks
 

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Just broke my top one off too after replacing the alternator. Hoping the bottom one works so I don't have to replace the tensioner mechanism. I will be sure to go slow and steady on the bottom one!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
SO I installed a new tensioner and torqued to 55 ft-lb, but did not use the Honda Bolt for the tensioner, and of course the bolt broke and now it's buried in the block. 90 degree drill and left hand drill bits? It's got 200 k miles and I should be happy its lasted this long.
Thanks for the help
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I had saved the newer Honda bolt that had the tensioner on the 1st time. Really heavy duty, and lesson learned. Aftermarket is not always the best, but the cheapest. Does anyone know the torque specification, I remember writing it down as 55 ft-lb.
 

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Here is some good news for those who have broken the Dummy Tensioner Bolt that is normally used to reduce the tension on the Serpentine Belt to remove or install it on your engine.

Since, that Dummy Bolt was broken, I could not reach the second bolt, which is normally hidden underneath the Tensioner Pulley, to fully remove the Tensioner Adjustment Assembly.

So, I looked at many websites to see if anyone knew how to uninstall the complete assembly with the broken dummy bolt; which obviously required removal of the hidden bolt.

I have attached the picture of the damaged Dummy Bolt, to make it easier for readers to understand the problem I was facing.

Generally speaking, the only ideas I got from different clubs was to drill another hole inside the Tensioner Assembly and then move the pulley to its locked pin position to get access to the normally hidden bolt.

Last night I got this idea: What would happen if I removed the Tensioner Pulley on the damaged assembly? Would that give me access to the hidden bolt?

Please note that I was doing this on a 2003 Mercedes C240. So, it is possible that my solution might not work for all the Serpentine Belt Tensioner Assemblies on the other cars on this planet.

In the morning, I went and bought the kit to open the Torx-50 bolt for about $16. It came with many other bolt removers; such as Torx-45, etc.

It took me about 20 seconds to unmount the Tensioner Pulley with my new tools. But, I was pleasantly surprised to see the hidden second bolt of the assembly. So, my problem was solved.

I removed the hidden and the other bolts off the Tensioner Assembly. Threw away the damaged Tensioner Assembly, and successfully installed my old Tensioner Assembly along with my new Serpentine Belt.

This saved me at least $400 that many people seemed to have paid to handle similar issues with their Serpentine Belt Tensioner Assemblies. So, I thought I would pass this idea for others to benefit from my experience.
 

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Here is some good news for those who have broken the Dummy Tensioner Bolt that is normally used to reduce the tension on the Serpentine Belt to remove or install it on your engine.

Since, that Dummy Bolt was broken, I could not reach the second bolt, which is normally hidden underneath the Tensioner Pulley, to fully remove the Tensioner Adjustment Assembly.

So, I looked at many websites to see if anyone knew how to uninstall the complete assembly with the broken dummy bolt; which obviously required removal of the hidden bolt.

I have attached the picture of the damaged Dummy Bolt, to make it easier for readers to understand the problem I was facing.

Generally speaking, the only ideas I got from different clubs was to drill another hole inside the Tensioner Assembly and then move the pulley to its locked pin position to get access to the normally hidden bolt.

Last night I got this idea: What would happen if I removed the Tensioner Pulley on the damaged assembly? Would that give me access to the hidden bolt?

Please note that I was doing this on a 2003 Mercedes C240. So, it is possible that my solution might not work for all the Serpentine Belt Tensioner Assemblies on the other cars on this planet.

In the morning, I went and bought the kit to open the Torx-50 bolt for about $16. It came with many other bolt removers; such as Torx-45, etc.

It took me about 20 seconds to unmount the Tensioner Pulley with my new tools. But, I was pleasantly surprised to see the hidden second bolt of the assembly. So, my problem was solved.

I removed the hidden and the other bolts off the Tensioner Assembly. Threw away the damaged Tensioner Assembly, and successfully installed my old Tensioner Assembly along with my new Serpentine Belt.

This saved me at least $400 that many people seemed to have paid to handle similar issues with their Serpentine Belt Tensioner Assemblies. So, I thought I would pass this idea for others to benefit from my experience.
I have no idea what you just said & did but OK. Are you describing a Mercedes procedure here or a Honda Odyssey procedure? If one of the dummy bolts breaks off there is another one. If you break both of them off, just cut the belt. Not sure what "hidden" bolt you're talking about. If you just can't bring yourself to cut the belt and you've broken both dummy bolts, just remove the bolt that holds the hydraulic piston at the bottom.
 

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I have no idea what you just said & did but OK. Are you describing a Mercedes procedure here or a Honda Odyssey procedure? If one of the dummy bolts breaks off there is another one. If you break both of them off, just cut the belt. Not sure what "hidden" bolt you're talking about. If you just can't bring yourself to cut the belt and you've broken both dummy bolts, just remove the bolt that holds the hydraulic piston at the bottom.
I have posted my experience with a Mercedes on an Odyssey Club mainly because if somebody comes across this problem and wants to remove the Serpentine Belt Tensioner, he could use my approach that worked on a Mercedes and access the bolt that typically gets hidden behind the Tensioner Pulley without going through an expensive or time-consuming process on an Odyssey.
 

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A while back, I broke the top socket off the serpentine tensioner too. We are looking to replace the alternator and at the same time replace the tensioner, but the price is like $182. Is this important to replace the tensioner because of the broken top bolt? Also, this is the original serpentine tensioner with about 202K miles. How long does the serpentine belt last? Thanks,
 
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