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Well, to know if the new piston rings were different, one would have to do some study of Honda parts lists. It's very possible they do use different rings when replacing. In fact, starting in model year 2014*, the rings were different. Here is my theory: vans that get used for a lot of suburban driving are far more affected. Having the engine kicking into and out of cylinder deactivation causes nothing but trouble. It's too bad Honda could not have had a button to turn off "ecno" but , because they did this to raise their CAFE rating, they could not. It should also be pointed out that Honda has similar oil consumption issues with other vehicles that used these low friction piston rings. Vehicles that do not have cylinder deactivation.

*I don't have a VCM van, but if and when I probably do, I will use a muzzler even if it is a newer model. But I might be inclined to use the new one that allows you to turn the VCM back on. Just to use on long trips on the interstate.
 

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How did the oil get into the combustion chambers if the piston rings were functioning as intended?
They obviously weren't functioning as intended.

None of us average Joes out here knows for sure why because we aren't privy to the results of Honda's study and testing. There are a few theories out there, but I think a likely explanation is that these rings need the pressure from combustion to push them fully against the cylinder wall and seal completely. The oil simply blows by the rings when the cylinder is deactivated. This hypothesis accounts for the fact that the original piston rings work perfectly fine in cylinders 5 and 6 (which never get deactivated) but not in cylinders 1-4 (which do get switched on and off). Once the oil is past the rings and into the combustion chamber, the fouling and rings sticking and other problems are more or less inevitable.

As to whether the piston rings were redesigned or what got changed, once again, us average Joes don't know for sure. Honda's not exactly an open book when it comes to these issues. And some people with newer vans have had VCM-related misfire issues too. But at the end user level, I don't think it really matters because here's what we do know - regardless of whether or not your van has the newer or older style of piston rings, cylinders that run all the time don't have problems. So if you deactivate VCM and let all 6 cylinders fire all the time, your chances of developing these problems drop to nearly zero. You can eliminate the problem yourself, and it only costs you about a hundred bucks and (maybe) 1 mpg to do it.
 

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Well, to know if the new piston rings were different, one would have to do some study of Honda parts lists. It's very possible they do use different rings when replacing. In fact, starting in model year 2014*, the rings were different. Here is my theory: vans that get used for a lot of suburban driving are far more affected. Having the engine kicking into and out of cylinder deactivation causes nothing but trouble. It's too bad Honda could not have had a button to turn off "ecno" but , because they did this to raise their CAFE rating, they could not. It should also be pointed out that Honda has similar oil consumption issues with other vehicles that used these low friction piston rings. Vehicles that do not have cylinder deactivation.

*I don't have a VCM van, but if and when I probably do, I will use a muzzler even if it is a newer model. But I might be inclined to use the new one that allows you to turn the VCM back on. Just to use on long trips on the interstate.
So by way of logical deduction, by disabling "vcm", there is no guarantee that excessive oil consumption won't happen. But, since the oil that is left in the combustion chambers are "burned off" with vcm being disabled, can I assume then that the other related problems such as fouled up s.plugs and clogged up piston rings would be prevented. If so, I would proceed to get the vcm turned off for good.
 

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They obviously weren't functioning as intended.

None of us average Joes out here knows for sure why because we aren't privy to the results of Honda's study and testing. There are a few theories out there, but I think a likely explanation is that these rings need the pressure from combustion to push them fully against the cylinder wall and seal completely. The oil simply blows by the rings when the cylinder is deactivated. This hypothesis accounts for the fact that the original piston rings work perfectly fine in cylinders 5 and 6 (which never get deactivated) but not in cylinders 1-4 (which do get switched on and off). Once the oil is past the rings and into the combustion chamber, the fouling and rings sticking and other problems are more or less inevitable.

As to whether the piston rings were redesigned or what got changed, once again, us average Joes don't know for sure. Honda's not exactly an open book when it comes to these issues. And some people with newer vans have had VCM-related misfire issues too. But at the end user level, I don't think it really matters because here's what we do know - regardless of whether or not your van has the newer or older style of piston rings, cylinders that run all the time don't have problems. So if you deactivate VCM and let all 6 cylinders fire all the time, your chances of developing these problems drop to nearly zero. You can eliminate the problem yourself, and it only costs you about a hundred bucks and (maybe) 1 mpg to do it.
Thank you. You have provided the most simple explanation. I can now see the causal effect of vcm.
 

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So by way of logical deduction, by disabling "vcm", there is no guarantee that excessive oil consumption won't happen. But, since the oil that is left in the combustion chambers are "burned off" with vcm being disabled, can I assume then that the other related problems such as fouled up s.plugs and clogged up piston rings would be prevented. If so, I would proceed to get the vcm turned off for good.
To know for sure how much the "experimental low friction" piston rings are the root of excessive oil consumption will require some folks posting in the 2011-2017 section with high mile 2014 or later vans that don't have them. If there starts to be a pattern of issues in those newer vans we will know more. So many regulars who have had 2005-2010 vans and now replaced with newer vans just Muzzle right away. I know I would. (will)
 

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We're going through the same thing with the misfire codes and VCM..last Friday the dealer told us they will have to do the piston ring fix at 77,000 miles. I plan on researching the VCM muzzler. I would be curious to know the percentage of VCM vehicles on the road and the number of failures and the mileage they occurred. And if there is some common denominator. From researching the posts, it seems we're at the higher end mileage wise.
Yup.... I'm at 77,000 miles and now we are fighting honda because they want to disassemble everything because we arent covered from the lawsuit.... we also got the cylinder 3 misfire code
 

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FEB. 2020:
I'll add to this topic. Short story. We purchased a brand new 2010 Honda Odyssey EXL in January of 2010. The vehicle has a 3.5L V6, 24 valves, 244 hp @ 5700 rpm and 5 speed automatic transmission. Mileage as of February 2020 was ~ 83,500. This van was sparingly used over the last ten years averaging below 8,400 miles a year. Over the course of time, typical routine maintenance was performed including regular oil changes, tires and alignment, brakes, headlights, etc.

In April 2019, we had an issue that required the coils to be replaced (3 and 4) as well as the spark plugs. An Oxygen sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) was replaced on September 2019. I attributed this to basic maintenance although seeing a coil and oxygen sensor needing replacement was somewhat unexpected.

Recently in Feb. 2020, the engine light began flashing about 15 miles from our home. The van started to run very rough but was able to make it home. I was able to check the error code and found it to be a P0303 code. This was for a cylinder 3 misfire. Curious, I went to search the internet and what I uncovered was astounding and led me here where I learned of the Honda class action lawsuit.

I am currently out ~$3,600 to have the piston rings replaced as well as the timing belt (because, why not......). None too happy and am trying to deal with Honda North America and, honestly, not expecting much. Guess we should have driven more to get under the 8 year window.......not good. Not good for anyone. Has anyone had any success getting Honda to help rebate the cost of repairs?

Thanks in advance.....
 

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Why don't you try replacing the plugs and then install a VCMTunerII and see if the issue reverses itself. I'd sure try it before shelling out for an overhaul. Most of the time disabling the VCM will clean up the rings and reverse it.
 

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One thing to remember is that using a 'muzzling device' creates a much, much better driving vehicle, and it may also slow down your oil usage and prevent future plug fouling. I did mine at 40K miles, and I've never looked back.
 

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FEB. 2020:
I'll add to this topic. Short story. We purchased a brand new 2010 Honda Odyssey EXL in January of 2010. The vehicle has a 3.5L V6, 24 valves, 244 hp @ 5700 rpm and 5 speed automatic transmission. Mileage as of February 2020 was ~ 83,500. This van was sparingly used over the last ten years averaging below 8,400 miles a year. Over the course of time, typical routine maintenance was performed including regular oil changes, tires and alignment, brakes, headlights, etc.

In April 2019, we had an issue that required the coils to be replaced (3 and 4) as well as the spark plugs. An Oxygen sensor (bank 1, sensor 1) was replaced on September 2019. I attributed this to basic maintenance although seeing a coil and oxygen sensor needing replacement was somewhat unexpected.

Recently in Feb. 2020, the engine light began flashing about 15 miles from our home. The van started to run very rough but was able to make it home. I was able to check the error code and found it to be a P0303 code. This was for a cylinder 3 misfire. Curious, I went to search the internet and what I uncovered was astounding and led me here where I learned of the Honda class action lawsuit.

I am currently out ~$3,600 to have the piston rings replaced as well as the timing belt (because, why not......). None too happy and am trying to deal with Honda North America and, honestly, not expecting much. Guess we should have driven more to get under the 8 year window.......not good. Not good for anyone. Has anyone had any success getting Honda to help rebate the cost of repairs?

Thanks in advance.....
As a follow up, Honda North America actually read my letter and called me. The case is being looked over by a case manager and while they will likely not cover all the costs, it appears as if there will be some sort of restitution. The moral of the story is don't yell but compose a strongly worded letter and you will likely illicit a response. The entire situation still sucks but the alternative of buying a new van just didn't make sense. More later...........:cool:
 
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